Church and H.O.W. Forums for HOW Sound and AV - Your Displayed Name Must Be Your Real Full Name To Post In The Church and HOW Forums > H.O.W. AV

Cat5/6 or Coax for extended video?

<< < (2/4) > >>

Arnold B. Krueger:

--- Quote from: Jonathan Johnson on January 16, 2011, 09:24:43 PM ---
Baluns may be useful, but as others have pointed out, they are not always the best solution. If they were, we'd be connecting our VCRs to our TVs with CAT5e cables. To split the signal to multiple displays requires special equipment.

--- End quote ---

This is a funny comment since the essence of HDMI is doing almost exactly what you say never happens. 

If you've got a source (e.g. Blu Ray player) and a display with HDMI connections, this is almost always the best and easiest way to hook the two together.

On paper HDMI over long lines with active repeaters or high powered drivers should give the most perfect results since everything stays in the digital domain.

Doug Fowler:

--- Quote from: arnyk on January 20, 2011, 09:03:05 AM ---This is a funny comment since the essence of HDMI is doing almost exactly what you say never happens. 

If you've got a source (e.g. Blu Ray player) and a display with HDMI connections, this is almost always the best and easiest way to hook the two together.

On paper HDMI over long lines with active repeaters or high powered drivers should give the most perfect results since everything stays in the digital domain.

--- End quote ---

Please go to your profile and put your full name in the "Name" field.

Thank you.

Brad Weber:

--- Quote from: arnyk on January 20, 2011, 09:03:05 AM ---If you've got a source (e.g. Blu Ray player) and a display with HDMI connections, this is almost always the best and easiest way to hook the two together.
--- End quote ---
A source to a single display a limited distance away is indeed what HDMI most directly addresses.  That works well for most residential and consumer applications, the problem is that many pro AV applications involve multiple sources to multiple, and varying, destinations with longer distances between devices being common.


--- Quote from: arnyk on January 20, 2011, 09:03:05 AM ---On paper HDMI over long lines with active repeaters or high powered drivers should give the most perfect results since everything stays in the digital domain.
--- End quote ---
The signal being digital does not guarantee a 'perfect' result.  Analog signals tend to be affected by line losses, noise, etc. to varying degrees while digital signals tend to either not be affected or be very affected.

It seems that what potential capabilities of HDMI you are trying to implement affects the cable with four current HDMI cable types defined that are typically applicable to Pro AV:
* Standard HDMI Cable
* Standard HDMI Cable with Ethernet
* High Speed HDMI Cable
* High Speed HDMI Cable with EthernetSo it's easy to see that the cable can affect what capabilities are supported, for example a "Standard HDMI Cable" is supposed to be tested for 720p and 1080i signals but not for 1080p or Deep Color signals, which are part of the "High Speed HDMI Cable" rating.  Try sending a 1080p signal over a "Standard HDMI Cable" and it may work fine or may not work at all.

I also have to wonder if support for higher bandwidth signals, return audio and Ethernet may also impact any intermediate devices.  And HDCP becomes a factor with HDMI repeaters, drivers, etc.  Looking quickly at some such devices the product data seems to rarely address such factors, making a 'perfect' result a far from assured outcome.

Scott Raymond:

Thanks for all the info, suggestions and discussion!  I've been browsing, studying and ruminating on all the different hardware and ideas.  The vast amount of gear available is slightly staggering.  And I just basically looked through Extron and Magenta and one other company's product.  I now at least have a semi-educated idea of what it's going to take to implement a system depending on what goals and cost they want to achieve.  Other than staying with just basic video the solutions are all going to be fairly expensive to get into.  What comes about will likely depend on how important they see the need to upgrade or look down the road a bit for what we may be doing or needing then. 

Just FWIW we are in construction on stage one of a proposed 3 stage expansion.  This stage is an addition of space for a new nursery and conference room, moving and revamping the youth ministry as well as opening up the current entryway and upgrading the whole building with sprinklers.  So new video will be needed in the nursery and conference room in the addition, as well as possibly having video in the enlarged entry.  The other areas are an existing room that's had video and a gym/multipurpose room that might get a feed for overflow or miscellaneous use.  Those involve distances up to around 250 ft. whereas the others are all under 50 ft.  So we aren't talking huge distances at this stage but the second and third phases will involve a separate youth wing and then a new worship center and longer distances involved.  At this point it may boil down to cost and whether they feel the need for any type of digital signage for announcements or messaging etc.  I've seen text over composite from an older computer I have and it definitely "ain't pretty".

Looking at the Magenta hardware I came up with a rough estimate of 1300/1500 dollars for 4 or 5 locations and then whatever Cat5/6 costs would end up at.  With the longer runs it sounds like it might be good to use low skew cable even though it might not be absolutely required at that distance.  Running discrete coax could easily get up in the same area with splitters or matrices involved with that.  The other idea brought up with HD rf was one that hadn't occurred to  me even though we're currently using old analog RF.  Doing a search I ran across an intriguing fairly new product from a company by the name of ZeeVee.  Some of you may have looked into them, they have modulators from around 900$ to maybe around 1800$.  If they are a reliable, quality product they would allow a fairly large distributable system built on standard single rf coax using pretty much off the shelf splitters etc.  They use QAM channels so any off the shelf consumer flatpanel (cable capable obviously) could be used at the receiving end.  Adding another unit and a simple combiner some where down the road would be easy and allow sending different program material to any location.  Seems like a viable option for a ways down the road but I'll welcome any thoughts anyone has on something like this.  Here's the link for anyone that hasn't run across them yet.

http://www.zeevee.com

Thanks again!

Scott

Kevin Hoober:
Scott,

I recently implemented a digital CATV distribution setup for a new campus.  I was originally looking at the ZeeVee product, but was steered away from that product by some smart folks.  I came across (and was recommended to) Contemporary Research's QMOD-HD boxes--I have 3 (2X HD, 1X HDSDI).  They work great...and look good--I highly recommend them. 

Kevin

Navigation

[0] Message Index

[#] Next page

[*] Previous page

Go to full version