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Author Topic: 3-Phase Power Supply  (Read 3835 times)

Yan Ovtchinikov

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3-Phase Power Supply
« on: November 12, 2006, 10:26:40 pm »

Hey guys i seen these multi-pin connectors at concerts and gigs, and i heard something about that they are 3phase connectors, but not quiet sure of what it is....can any of you guys give some mroe info on that?


Many Thanks
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Michael King

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Re: 3-Phase Power Supply
« Reply #1 on: November 13, 2006, 12:25:55 am »

Mats Fagerkull

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Re: 3-Phase Power Supply
« Reply #2 on: November 13, 2006, 08:14:16 am »

Hi Yan,

I guess you are asking about these: http://www.electronics2000.co.uk/data/pinout/socapex.htm

/mats
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Yan Ovtchinikov

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Re: 3-Phase Power Supply
« Reply #3 on: November 13, 2006, 02:00:52 pm »

Thanks for the links guys, came in realy helpfull there:)


God bless
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Yan Ovtchinikov

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Re: 3-Phase Power Supply
« Reply #4 on: November 26, 2006, 10:31:52 pm »

Hey guys another question, one thing i dont get is in a usual gig at a theatre or venue how would you get that amount of voltage? for Lighting, Vidieo, and Sound....... from the normal 230V 3pin MAINS outlet and going into this BIG 3-Phase multipin connector....... through the 3-phase cable going into a rack where it is all split up?

Or

Do theatre or those places already have a MAINS unit built into the wall that has a MAINS multipin outlet, but with that BIG multipin connector that gives 3-phases with soo much voltage?.......


Funny thing i found when i was setting up sound on stage at the dominion theatre in london, and there was this Rack Box where this BIG multi-pin connector was getting plugged into.....well that Box said Danger 440V, and the question that i also got is "Why danger when this total of 440V was split up into much smalled voltages anyway???

Hope this is not too much but i sure appreciate your help on this.
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Ron Balsom

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Re: 3-Phase Power Supply
« Reply #5 on: November 27, 2006, 02:49:46 am »

Hi Yan, I'm not an electrician, but if you have a moment, let me help you with some understanding of power here in the U.S.  First, in Europe, when power is generated, it normally is delivered to the homes, churches, etc. thru a single wire at 220v. plus another wire to go with it which is "common" or "ground". The appearance of those plug-ins are different looking than ours in the U.S.  The light, electric drill, or audio mixer and amp then would be plugged-in and those appliances would work with the 220v. by design. If that particular building was wired with 2 ea. 'hot' 220v. wires and only 1ea. ground, then that appliance should be designed to use 440v.  The reason for the 'warning labels' is because the 220v. found in each of the 'legs' would easily injure of kill you.  Where in the U.S. all the standard legs are only 120v. and human injury is a 'bit' less!!  ( looking at our typical household wall plug-ins, you'll see three holes: 2 parallel and a small round hole. The smaller parallel is the 120v. 'hot'.  The larger parallel is 'common' or 'ground' When used together they will supply our sound equipment with 120v. However, over 20 years ago, our standard was changed to include use of that third round hole as a more "secure" or "safety" ground. Most of our audio/video equipment today will have that type of standard 3-prong plug.)  On that type of equipment you'll usually find that 3-prong plug which is a 'safety' ground to protect you and I from possible 'injury' from touching the outer cases or handles.  I say all that to say this......First, you my find multi-pin connectors with our audio equip. such as running mic signals from stage to the mixer. Also around the mixer to connect the 'outboard gear' to the system.  Let's you and I limit your handling to those multi-pin  connectors ONLY!!!!!  Secondly, you may find a little heavier connector in use around lighting, either portable or fixed lighting that will have 'higher' voltages than audio. Unless instructed, DO NOT TOUCH!!!!.  Thirdly, and probably what you've seen, are multi-pin connectors with 'heavier cable', from stage power panels. These higher power cables usually go to smaller 'break-out' boxes where the power may be reduced to 220 or 120v. connectors.  Again, DO NOT get involved with cables and connectors for typical audio and video other than what you can get to in your standard wall outlets unless you are instructed!!!!!! Sure hope this helps, and by the way, keep being involved in serving as you are, and you can always find help right here!  Just a faithful servant,  Ron Balsom Highland Park Community Church,  Casper, Wyoming.. 307-262-2138 cell anytime!!
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Tom Young

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Re: 3-Phase Power Supply
« Reply #6 on: November 27, 2006, 07:21:02 am »

Yan-

So far you have received some useful, and some not so useful, advice on what 3-phase power is.

Unlike audio system wiring, which there is an equal amount of misinformation about, electrical power represents very clear danger to those who mess with it and do not know what they are doing.

On the LAB section here at ProSoundWeb we (who have been around audio for some time) generally shy away from offering advice on (at least) the hardware and application of this subject. In the process of offering such advice, should the actions of those who read these posts result in damage, injury or death...... we can be held liable.

Just as is the case with suspended loudspeakers (and lighting, etc) it is extremely foolish and irresponsible to offer guidance that will be used by those who are not qualified to do this work. The only folks who are qualified to do this work or discuss it's application are licensed professionals and these folks understandibly do not provide their expertise for free or on internet forums. At most public venues it is mandated by law that the only person who can tie into 3-phase power is a licensed electrician.

Having said all the above, there have been some useful threads on LAB over the years on the *theoretical* aspects of 3-phase power and the design of power distro's (the portable equipment used to distribute 3-phase power to lower voltage branch circuits). These are worth reading.

There are also a few texts and articles that discuss this. Google.

But the bottom line remains that no one other than licensed professionals should be connecting to 3-phase, high-voltage power on their own.
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Yan Ovtchinikov

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Re: 3-Phase Power Supply
« Reply #7 on: November 27, 2006, 11:13:31 am »

Thank you guys for your replies specially.....Ron many thanks to you, you did really explain it in a really simplified way. Where as ofcourse without me knowing and being qualified for this i will never go into playing about with POWER but its just that i often see these 3-phase big power cables connected to this Box where they are all split up into smaller voltages, but my question was:

Where do they get soo much power in the first place, where as here in europe our mains normal household power is 230V, but is it possible that in all theaters they wont have these normal Mains outlets? but have specially designed built into the wall units that will have the BIG multipin connectors into which you connect the 3 phase power plugs that will give you like 600V or something like that.


Again Many thanks for everything, i just want to understand the brief principle of how this works and where they get so much power.


God bless all
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Ron Balsom

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Re: 3-Phase Power Supply
« Reply #8 on: November 27, 2006, 12:23:39 pm »

Well, here I am eager to give two cents worth and didn't read further to see that your 'out of country' DAAAAAA!!!!!!! However the principle is still the same. (besides, it was late at night, HA!)  Power is always 'generated' at a higher voltage, or pressure, just to get to the building, then step down transformers are used to supply the correct voltage.  Next time I'll read further to make sure what 'country' I'm talking to.  Tom's advice sums it up real well. Our knowledge to understand is important, however, let's all be careful not to touch things that are beyond our responsibility.  By the way, you live in a beautiful part of the world, been through London several times in route to East Africa on work camps.  PTL.  Ron Balsom, Casper,Wyo.
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Yan Ovtchinikov

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Re: 3-Phase Power Supply
« Reply #9 on: November 27, 2006, 01:01:18 pm »

Yh london is pretty great, real busy i must say.....i wish i lived in the US its more calm in the us, i mean some where like california US is more wide open where as london is getting packed up. OHHH right yh most theatres in london do have a 63amp socket for the high voltage 3 phase connection.
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ProSoundWeb Community

Re: 3-Phase Power Supply
« Reply #9 on: November 27, 2006, 01:01:18 pm »


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