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Author Topic: Matrix Switcher  (Read 7404 times)

Jeremy Peters

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Matrix Switcher
« on: April 11, 2011, 11:29:47 pm »

Guys. Anybody know of a decently priced 4x16 HDMI matrix switcher? Thanks in advance!
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Brad Weber

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Re: Matrix Switcher
« Reply #1 on: April 12, 2011, 07:55:17 am »

Guys. Anybody know of a decently priced 4x16 HDMI matrix switcher? Thanks in advance!
You need to change your Alias or displayed name to your real name or the thread will get locked.
 
What do you consider "decently priced"?  Does it need to be HDCP compliant?
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Jeremy Peters

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Re: Matrix Switcher
« Reply #2 on: April 12, 2011, 02:08:24 pm »

Thanks, Brad I will change it to what I really prefer-my real name!

I saw some priced at over 4K and that is a big no no. I do not require HDCP.
The application calls for routing video from upto four sources over a HDMI network to various TVs located in different locations at our church.

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Karl Maciag

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Re: Matrix Switcher
« Reply #3 on: May 03, 2011, 11:31:52 pm »

4K for that amount of I/O is reasonable.  Be careful sending HDMI over long distances.  Your limit using regular cables is around 45 ft.  After that you will need to switch to a CAT5 type transmitter and receiver,  or a HDMI equalizer that can allow a HDMI cable run of 100-200 ft depending on the equalizer used.  More than a couple hundred ft,  and you will start looking at fiber solutions. 
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Brad Weber

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Re: Matrix Switcher
« Reply #4 on: May 04, 2011, 07:29:59 am »

Be careful sending HDMI over long distances.  Your limit using regular cables is around 45 ft.  After that you will need to switch to a CAT5 type transmitter and receiver,  or a HDMI equalizer that can allow a HDMI cable run of 100-200 ft depending on the equalizer used.  More than a couple hundred ft,  and you will start looking at fiber solutions.
Karl brings up a good point about the distances involved and if most of the destinations would be addressed using video over UTP/CAT or fiber, then it may be more cost effective to route the UTP or fiber rather than HDMI.
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Christopher Young

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Re: Matrix Switcher
« Reply #5 on: May 04, 2011, 03:37:51 pm »

Thanks, Brad I will change it to what I really prefer-my real name!

I saw some priced at over 4K and that is a big no no. I do not require HDCP.
The application calls for routing video from upto four sources over a HDMI network to various TVs located in different locations at our church.

Why HDMI but not HDCP compliant?  The reason I ask is, you may be surprised what sources won't output to non-compliant devices.  While I've yet to run into this myself, rumours abound with cheap laptops and blue ray players that won't output non-protected content if they see a non-compliant device in the chain.

We've only just started dealing with digital installations and it is proving to be a headache.

 I hate to say it but, if  4K for a 4*16 switcher is too much, you probably can't afford to go this route.  Kramer makes the PT-571/572 transmitter receiver for about 180 per box, so that's an extra 400 per display.  You may get away with a standard cable for some, but the rest will need something like this.  Unless that part was already in the budget and I assume too much  :)

What are the intended sources?
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Karl Maciag

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Re: Matrix Switcher
« Reply #6 on: May 04, 2011, 06:58:16 pm »

Good point Chris about HDCP.  I'm finding it harder and harder to even find HDMI devices that don't accommodate HDCP.  If budget is that big of a concern,  I would go analog,  and send hi-res using RGBHV, or even component signals.  But then the issue will arise soon that some sources won't output 1080 anything over an analog output......Oh the joys of changing standards.  Just to give you an idea,  a church customer of mine bought a 8x8 HDMI matrix,  and CAT5 extenders to reach a couple local displays, and 4 long distance ones.  They did the installation, and it still came in more than $8000 for the hardware.  I'd save your money and make sure you can do it right the first time.  Good luck!
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Christopher Young

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Re: Matrix Switcher
« Reply #7 on: May 05, 2011, 02:07:19 pm »

Oh the joys of changing standards. 

Yup, because our main sources are DVD/VHS, document cameras and laptops, I've been dragged kicking and screaming into HDMI. 

It's not that I'm a Luddite, it's just that most of the media in the library is VHS or DVD, and so far all the laptops come with VGA out.  The more I learn about and implement HDMI the madder I get.  Pro AV has been totally disregarded by the industry and we have to run around putting very expensive band aid solutions on big installations just to protect content that is going to get hacked anyway.  Argghhh.  Now I'm mad again.   :'(

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Brad Weber

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Re: Matrix Switcher
« Reply #8 on: May 05, 2011, 04:40:07 pm »

Pro AV has been totally disregarded by the industry and we have to run around putting very expensive band aid solutions on big installations just to protect content that is going to get hacked anyway.
I've also heard the perspective from some within the pro AV industry that it may not have so much been us being disregarded as it was us choosing to not be proactive, possibly because of the perspective at that time that it involved consumer products and thus didn't directly affect us.
 
I'm actually in the midst of a project with a facility upgrading their rooms to accommodate widescreen projection, HDMI, DVI, HD-SDI, AirPlay, etc.  They envision more and more people walking in with a tablet or even a smartphone as the source for their presentations.
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Jonathan Kok

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Re: Matrix Switcher
« Reply #9 on: May 05, 2011, 08:17:50 pm »

I've also heard the perspective from some within the pro AV industry that it may not have so much been us being disregarded as it was us choosing to not be proactive, possibly because of the perspective at that time that it involved consumer products and thus didn't directly affect us.
 
I'm actually in the midst of a project with a facility upgrading their rooms to accommodate widescreen projection, HDMI, DVI, HD-SDI, AirPlay, etc.  They envision more and more people walking in with a tablet or even a smartphone as the source for their presentations.
Not too sure I agree with you (or rather, 'them') on that.  While I understand their point, ProAV ignored it because ProAV has no need for it.  It IS a consumer item.  Unfortunately, the studios added things to it that have now forced our hand.  If HDCP did not exist, laptops and blu-ray players wouldn't need HDMI.  The concept that 1080p resolutions won't work over component has been debunked long ago.  Outside of the home, very few installations make use of 7.1 surround sound.
Now, we're stuck spending a lot of extra money on the components we need just to make it work AS WELL as, say, VGA.  Not better...just AS WELL.  Ridiculous.

EDIT: Aaand back on topic...
You may not think you need HDCP, but if you're in any way looking to the future, it'd be silly not to ensure some sort of HDCP compliance.  It doesn't have to be smooth...it just has to work.  $4K is actually a pretty good price on an 8x16 matrix switcher.
« Last Edit: May 05, 2011, 08:20:26 pm by Jonathan Kok »
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