ProSoundWeb Community

Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
Advanced search  

Pages: [1]   Go Down

Author Topic: Sony Vegas  (Read 3138 times)

bill bassett

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 2
Sony Vegas
« on: July 18, 2006, 12:29:09 pm »

Hi all,
Long time reader 1st time poster. I'm looking into purchasing some new equipment for my church. We are upgrading our cameras and are now going to record the service with the intent of making CD's, DVD's and a VHS to send to the local TV stations. We are looking at using Sony Vegas for post production to then make any form of media they may want. We're looking to do multitrack audio directly in live but i can't figure out if you can also record video directly out of a DV-camcorder live into the Vegas software so it will sync. Or do we have to purchase a camcorder that has a timecode input. We are looking at a Canon GL-2 but all i can see is that it records it's own timecode on the DV tape and does not have an output to sync w/ another device. At some point in the near future we should be purchasing a Mackie TT-24 and taking the ADAT outputs to a RME soundcard with fiber-optic for the multitracks but for now we're just going to use a USB interface and record 2 tracks. If anyone has a similar setup or is doing the same type of thing and can help i'd very much appreciate it. Thanks

Logged

Invisible Member

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 2
Re: Sony Vegas
« Reply #1 on: July 24, 2006, 03:12:35 pm »


My first guess would be a camera capable of sync from external sources like the Panasonic AG-DVX100B or similar.  

If I am reading you correctly you want to replace the camera audio with audio from Vegas?  You might try using the audio track on the DV to record SMPTE fed from Vegas since the GL2 accepts balanced audio inputs for external mics. I used to strip audio on multitrack reel to reel machines for SMPTE all the time and it might possible to stripe the DV realtime to "lock it" to Vegas later..

If your intent to take the Audio from the mixer without edits to can use mic splitters and dual feed vegas and the external mics on the GL2 at the same time.

I've done it before,  but usually I spend alot time doing edits to align the audio manually after the fact. I track video NTSC with a Cam and use a standalone Marantz CD burner to burn the Mix live to CD from the mixer... I align them after importing the files into Vegas... Depending on how many tracks of audio your trying to handle the task could be from simply laborious to torture.

Peace,
Dennis

Logged

Greg Hertfelder

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 318
Re: Sony Vegas
« Reply #2 on: July 27, 2006, 09:56:18 pm »

I have Vegas 6.0, and there is not a "Record Arming" button on video tracks for live recording. Under the topic of "Record" in Help, only audio recording is described.

I have successfully captured seperate video (with camera audio) and imported CD audio tracks in Vegas, and then aligned the audio waveforms visually (with verification by listening). As long as there is some kind of common audio on both videotape and CD sources, its a breeze using a Vegas marker for vertical reference, and zooming in to verify perfect alignment. Having come from the broadcast world, its always nice to have everything locked to SMPTE time code, but its not that big of a deal anymore to just align the tracks visually with slip & slide functionality. Just make sure that no one stops the camcorder or audio recording mechanism during the acquisition phase.

However, you may want to do the editing in phases. First align the tracks, make multitrack audio mixing adjustments and render as an AVI. Then import the AVI on to a new .VEG file version and edit, add titles, graphics, background loops, etc. This may or may not make sense, depending on personnel, workflow, etc.

Also, you can always record the video & audio to DV tape, but to speed workflow, you might consider recording the video using  direct-to-edit memory or PC hard drive and then import the video to Vegas.

(Dennis, thanks for your input, but please change your profile name from Invisible Member to your real name. Its a rule on this Forum.)
Logged

Dennis Whitney

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1
    • http://www.Golgothamedia.net
Re: Sony Vegas
« Reply #3 on: July 29, 2006, 11:39:03 am »

Greg Hertfelder wrote on Thu, 27 July 2006 21:56

 
(Dennis, thanks for your input, but please change your profile name from Invisible Member to your real name. Its a rule on this Forum.)


Fixed... I had to create a new account.


One quick thing to remember is default for recording seperate audio is to make sure the tracking is done at the same speed at the video. It should be a no brainer but I've had audio tracked at 30fps while my video was recorded at 25fps because intermingling different cameras.

I think the real challenge is when your comping 3 different camera angles from 3 different cameras where the audio on each camera is slighlty different. You Shooting close ups where the audio is near coincidental with the video and long shots where the audio is a few milliseconds late with a different phase.

Peace,
Dennis


Logged

bill bassett

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 2
Re: Sony Vegas
« Reply #4 on: July 29, 2006, 02:18:55 pm »

Thanks for all your help. We decided to go w/ the GL-2 so it looks like i'll be aligning the tracks and video after. It's good to hear that someone has done it before without too much trouble. I'll make sure to mix down first then align, and also to make sure the audio is recording at the same FPS as the video is on the tape. Thanks again for all your help.

bill bassett
Logged

Brian Kent Tennyson

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 68
    • http://www.visitec.com
Re: Sony Vegas
« Reply #5 on: July 30, 2006, 01:14:46 pm »

Dito, my wife uses Vegas in our home studio and she loves it. Very powerfull tool. We shoot with three seperate cameras at most of the wedings we do and just line up the audio later. As long as you keep all three rolling the whole time, alignment is easy.

Also, Vasst has a cool plug in the lest you do heads up editing on four cameras just like in Avid.

www.vasst.com

Logged
You can't get enough, but enough ain't the test.

Brian Kent Tennyson
Visitec Inc.
www.visitec.com

Greg Hertfelder

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 318
Re: Sony Vegas
« Reply #6 on: July 30, 2006, 10:11:32 pm »

Quote:

Also, Vasst has a cool plug in the lest you do heads up editing on four cameras just like in Avid.


Brian
Could you please elaborate on the term "heads up" video? This is not a term I am familiar with, but it sounds like a time-saver. Is this function related to ISO-CAM shooting, in which each camera has a dedicated tape deck? What is the specific name of the plug-in?
Thanks,
Greg
Logged

Aaron McQueen

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 557
Re: Sony Vegas
« Reply #7 on: July 31, 2006, 03:01:50 pm »

I think he is referring to infinitiCam by vasst.

http://www.vasst.com/product.aspx?id=af2fc38a-a4f9-49e7-bdb2 -88b4c435cca4

It allows you to playback multiple cameras during editing and pick the camera to switch to.  It's like have a live control room in post production editing.  I'm assuming this is what he means by "heads up" as well.  Set up four cameras, let them roll, and then make it look like you did the camera switching live during editing.  The effect is very nice and professional looking. Premiere Pro can do this as well, but is limited to 4 cameras.  Here is a tutorial.

http://media.libsyn.com/media/premierecow/PremierePro2.m4v

 
Logged
Faith comes by hearing, and hearing by the word of God - Romans 10:17 NKJV

Brian Kent Tennyson

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 68
    • http://www.visitec.com
Re: Sony Vegas
« Reply #8 on: July 31, 2006, 11:35:36 pm »

Aaron McQueen wrote on Mon, 31 July 2006 14:01

I think he is referring to infinitiCam by vasst.

 http://www.vasst.com/product.aspx?id=af2fc38a-a4f9-49e7-bdb2 -88b4c435cca4

It allows you to playback multiple cameras during editing and pick the camera to switch to.  It's like have a live control room in post production editing.  I'm assuming this is what he means by "heads up" as well.  Set up four cameras, let them roll, and then make it look like you did the camera switching live during editing.  The effect is very nice and professional looking. Premiere Pro can do this as well, but is limited to 4 cameras.  Here is a tutorial.

http://media.libsyn.com/media/premierecow/PremierePro2.m4v

 



Oh, so you just "assume" that you know what I was talking about.

Yes, you are correct. That is what I was talking about. Thanks for elaborating.
Logged
You can't get enough, but enough ain't the test.

Brian Kent Tennyson
Visitec Inc.
www.visitec.com

ProSoundWeb Community

Re: Sony Vegas
« Reply #8 on: July 31, 2006, 11:35:36 pm »


Pages: [1]   Go Up
 



Page created in 0.055 seconds with 22 queries.