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Author Topic: Comm System  (Read 4875 times)

Henry Cohen

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Re: Comm System
« Reply #10 on: April 15, 2011, 05:24:24 pm »

Something to look into is whether you will be well served by one of the digital wireless coms systems in the cellular or wifi ranges.
No wireless intercom system sold for use in the US operates in the cellular bands. I suspect you're thinking of the unlicensed PCS band, 1.92-1.93GHz, which is of course between the licensed wireless carriers' PCS up and downlinks.
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Henry Cohen

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Brad Weber

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Re: Comm System
« Reply #11 on: April 15, 2011, 07:12:38 pm »

The wiring in the building is actually fairly good.  Along with a single intercom connection between booth and 2 backstage points, there is also 6 separate tie lines available alongside the intercom line.
If the tie lines are for line level audio then they probably can be used for wired comms, however it seems like it might be a bit awkward since you'd have to handle the related channel assignments, splitting, etc. externally and then tie into the tie lines.
 
I know most of the time we have lights on one channel, sound on one channel (except when i am mixing, can't stand wearing those things), the ASM's on another channel and the stage manager able to talk to all of us.  I don't know if in a professional theater this is how it is supposed to work but i know most shows the stage manager calls the cues and everyone else just needs to talk to people on their team so the stage manager needs to be able to talk to everyone.
Certainly not a bad thing to have more channels and a four channel system used with teh general assignments noted is not at all unusual.  However, it does seem a bit unusual to have a four channel system with such a limited number of potential users and connections.  I'm used to having comms available at follow spot positions, loading galleries, entries, catwalks, equipment and dimmer rack locations, lighting galleries, dressing rooms, green room, scene shop, TD's office and so on.  It's not unusual for me to have a channel that may have multiple termination points throughout a theatre, a small theatre that is currently under construction will have over 40 plate, floor box and speaker station comms terminations yet is initially being installed as a two channel system (all home run to terminal strips which while initially more costly, also allows the system to be easily reconfigured as needed or adapted to a larger channel count system in the future).  I am also not a fan of having the SM, who may be the only responsible adult directly involved in many school productions, limited to being in the booth and thus like it when the SM can call a show from the booth or off stage and can also work from in the house for tech rehearsals.

I did come across a need for a dressing room headset and to make it more professional, one in the entry/box office would be nice so i think wireless would come in handy here since there are no tie lines or intercom lines in those areas.
However, through walls to rooms some distance away is also where wireless may have the most problems unless you have antennas covering the different areas.
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Re: Comm System
« Reply #11 on: April 15, 2011, 07:12:38 pm »


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