ProSoundWeb Community

Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
Advanced search  

Pages: 1 [2]  All   Go Down

Author Topic: Is this the place for radio broadcast questions?  (Read 8254 times)

luis Markson

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 295
  • Just keep going....
Re: Is this the place for radio broadcast questions?
« Reply #10 on: April 11, 2011, 12:26:54 am »

Something is not matching up here.  Whether the console is Telos, Wheatstone, Audioarts, Arrakis, Radio Systems, Axia, AEQ or whatever, it does not sound like something one would typically associate with a community station operated by seniors out of a bedroom.  And the fact that there is no deadline, no money and no one that understands the equipment makes one wonder why the new console is needed and if trying to sell the console and get what they can to use for other things, like general maintenance of the equipment they already have, might be worth considering.
 
You say that all you are doing is installing a new desk, however you previously noted that you would next be asking questions about other parts of the systems and that "I'm hoping to understand the entire signal flow inc the broadcast gear (transmitters etc)."  Whether the latter are related to being for your personal growth or in order to offer related services may be an important distinction.  Wiring a replacement audio console into an existing broadcast system is one thing but some of the other areas are where they would probably need to get someone with the appropriate experience, equipment and certification to maybe make sure everything is proper and legal.


 +!  a Cheap Broadcast console is an expensive purchase for a Senior center.

  pew...this one stinks

  Hammer

I don't believe they need the desk. As far as I am aware the existing desk is fully operational. I have expressed this to them.

I was asked if I could Install it for them, as the new president was aware that I had worked in the audio industry. My Grandmother in-law presents a show on the station.

My interest in the broadcast equipment was, as suggested, for my own interest. It occurs to me that it would unwise to install a desk without an understanding of the i/o that interfaces with it.

The station is not run by a seniors center. It is run by seniors because no-one else is interested.

The desk was purchased as part of a government grant, however, no consideration was made for installation.

The desk is:

http://www.logitekaudio.com/jetstream_mini.html

with

http://www.logitekaudio.com/pilot.html

I do not offer any commercial services that would be of any interest to the statio, all I'm trying to do is help a comminity organisation.

What stinks is the assuption that something untoward is going on.

So I'll ask the question again,

When I start to install the desk will I find help here.
Logged

Brad Weber

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 2209
  • Marietta, GA
Re: Is this the place for radio broadcast questions?
« Reply #11 on: April 11, 2011, 08:29:12 am »

The issue is that sometimes the best intents can be misdirected and that trying to help someone may do more harm than good.  When you get into broadcast and especially transmission you are getting into a very tightly regulated industry and I think people just wanted to avoid having something come back to bite them or you.
 
I've been involved in several TV and radio broadcast studio projects and it is quite feasible to design and install an entire studio or studio complex without addressing the transmission side, which is often also a totally separate physical facility, other than what signals you need to provide them.  One of the factors often involved in existing commercial facilities and systems was that the existing systems had to remain operating right up until the last minute with everything in place for a very fast switchover to the new gear, which usually occurred at odd hours when the number of listeners or viewers was at a minimum.  In most cases it is not feasible to spend much time on configuration and troubleshooting after the fact, that all has to occur prior to trying to go live with the new equipment.
 
As I mentioned earlier, I have found the console manufacturers to usually be a great resource.  Technical data on that 'engine' including wiring for the audio connections can be found here, http://www.logitekaudio.com/manuals.html.  Getting into details of the specific application would take knowing factors such as the actual hardware configuration ordered (the JetStream Mini can be ordered with different combinations of microphone, stereo analog line level and stereo S/PDIF and/or AES digital input as well as stereo analog line level and stereo S/PDIF and/or AES digital output cards with all cards available with multiple RJ jacks or a single DB25), what the actual sources are, how any GPIO machine control might be integrated and so on.
 
If you really want to learn more about the broadcast side, I do recommend getting involved in SBE.
 
The equipment being purchased with government funds that did not extend to any installation, training, maintenance, etc. is a story I've seen before.
Logged

luis Markson

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 295
  • Just keep going....
Re: Is this the place for radio broadcast questions?
« Reply #12 on: April 11, 2011, 06:31:37 pm »

The issue is that sometimes the best intents can be misdirected and that trying to help someone may do more harm than good.  When you get into broadcast and especially transmission you are getting into a very tightly regulated industry and I think people just wanted to avoid having something come back to bite them or you.
 
I've been involved in several TV and radio broadcast studio projects and it is quite feasible to design and install an entire studio or studio complex without addressing the transmission side, which is often also a totally separate physical facility, other than what signals you need to provide them.  One of the factors often involved in existing commercial facilities and systems was that the existing systems had to remain operating right up until the last minute with everything in place for a very fast switchover to the new gear, which usually occurred at odd hours when the number of listeners or viewers was at a minimum.  In most cases it is not feasible to spend much time on configuration and troubleshooting after the fact, that all has to occur prior to trying to go live with the new equipment.
 
As I mentioned earlier, I have found the console manufacturers to usually be a great resource.  Technical data on that 'engine' including wiring for the audio connections can be found here, http://www.logitekaudio.com/manuals.html.  Getting into details of the specific application would take knowing factors such as the actual hardware configuration ordered (the JetStream Mini can be ordered with different combinations of microphone, stereo analog line level and stereo S/PDIF and/or AES digital input as well as stereo analog line level and stereo S/PDIF and/or AES digital output cards with all cards available with multiple RJ jacks or a single DB25), what the actual sources are, how any GPIO machine control might be integrated and so on.
 
If you really want to learn more about the broadcast side, I do recommend getting involved in SBE.
 
The equipment being purchased with government funds that did not extend to any installation, training, maintenance, etc. is a story I've seen before.

Thanks Brad. I'll start by getting in touch with the distributer and find out exactly how the Jet stream has been configured. I'll look into the SBE too.
Logged

Geoff Doane

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 817
  • Halifax, NS
Re: Is this the place for radio broadcast questions?
« Reply #13 on: April 20, 2011, 01:28:18 pm »

The station is not run by a seniors center. It is run by seniors because no-one else is interested.

The desk was purchased as part of a government grant, however, no consideration was made for installation.

The desk is:

http://www.logitekaudio.com/jetstream_mini.html

with

http://www.logitekaudio.com/pilot.html

That's a fairly serious looking setup there.  Perhaps the previous president was sacked because he spent far too much on a studio console without any thought to how it would be installed. ::)

Anyway, since my day gig is working as a broadcast technologist, here are a few aspects of broadcast installations that you may not be familiar with if you usually do PA installations.

Control room and studio microphones are interlocked with the monitor speakers in those areas.  i.e. when you turn on the mic at the console, the monitor speakers in that area must be automatically muted.  Every true broadcast console will have provision to do this, but there may be some programming involved since there can often be more than one studio space.

Broadcast consoles will often have more than one main mix bus, so that music can be played on-air, while an interview is being recorded independently through the same console.  There will be a monitor section on the console that selects what you listen to at any one time.  You therefore may want to connect recording devices to different outputs of the console, rather than feeding everything from one bus.

Mix minuses.  If you want to put a telephone call on-air or connect with another studio, you need a way to feed the full mix, except for that telephone or studio, back to them as a cue.  You can do this on a conventional console with aux sends, but that's often confusing for broadcast operators.  Real broadcast consoles will have dedicated mix-minus modules, or other means of programming this.  Read up on this and practice.  It's what separates the amateurs from the pros in this business.

GTD
Logged

ProSoundWeb Community

Re: Is this the place for radio broadcast questions?
« Reply #13 on: April 20, 2011, 01:28:18 pm »


Pages: 1 [2]  All   Go Up
 



Page created in 0.042 seconds with 23 queries.