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Am I crazy???

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Al Rettich:
So I've been toying with this idea of making my own cable checker. Taking a board, mounting all the connectors on it (up to eight contacts) then NL8 that into a cable checker that will accept NL8. So connectors that I use everyday, (L14-30, 7 Pin soco, Powercon, True1, Edison, IEC) can at the very least be continuity tested.. I found a computer program that does very much the same, but with the old SCSI cable. It wasn't cheap at all. Anyone else do anything like this? Pointers?

John Roberts {JR}:
I have designed commercial audio cable tester SKUs. If you DIY a tester make sure you construct it robustly so you will always trust the results. 

If you want to test unconventional cables you can make adapters to interface with standard cable testers, but that creates additional potential points of failure.

JR

Scott Helmke:
I've got cable testers for all the common things, but beyond that I'll make adapters to RJ45 (ie Cat5) and use a network continuity tester.  Nice because usually you can have a remote for testing installed cable.

Maybe you could find some old DSP hardware that has a lot of ins/outs?  Then it would be easy to make presets for whatever, you could use the built-in signal generator and metering capabilities.

Brian Jojade:
I still have and use a basic continuity tester that my dad built back in the 80's.  Dirt simple, press a button and the light above that button should light up.  This is pre-LED days, so it uses actual little incandescent lamps.  Tests XLR, 1/4" and RCA cables.  Batteries in it are forever old carbon batteries.  It's a cool tool built before stuff was readily available for next to nothing.

Now I can buy a full kit that does even more for under 50 bucks, so building my own new wouldn't make sense financially. But that doesn't mean having a tool you created yourself can't be fun.

Just remember that these basic testers are only testing basic continuity.  It doesn't check for things such as noise, crosstalk, failure under load (for power connections) etc.  Adding testing for more stuff on the cable can get the price to go up pretty darned quickly.

Frank Koenig:

--- Quote from: Al Rettich on May 21, 2024, 01:48:55 PM ---So I've been toying with this idea of making my own cable checker. Taking a board, mounting all the connectors on it (up to eight contacts) then NL8 that into a cable checker that will accept NL8. So connectors that I use everyday, (L14-30, 7 Pin soco, Powercon, True1, Edison, IEC) can at the very least be continuity tested.. I found a computer program that does very much the same, but with the old SCSI cable. It wasn't cheap at all. Anyone else do anything like this? Pointers?

--- End quote ---

Basic home-made cable tester here:

https://forums.prosoundweb.com/index.php/topic,171468.0.html

--Frank

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