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Operating UK equipment on US power

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Russell Ault:

--- Quote from: David Allred on March 22, 2024, 10:07:36 AM ---{...} European devices are designed to operate safely in a variety of different supply situations with both supply legs fully isolated and insulated from exposed parts. So a European nominal 230 V device can be plugged into a US 240 V socket without problems." {...}

--- End quote ---

I'm not sure I'd take this as gospel, personally. For example, while this should be correct for any devices with "Schuko" plugs (which aren't polarized), I wouldn't want to assume that it's true of all devices being sold in the (many) European countries where the plugs are polarized (e.g. the discussion here about L-Acoustics amps ostensibly requiring a neutral despite being "European devices").


--- Quote from: David Allred on March 22, 2024, 11:08:56 AM ---The gear is a koi pond air pump.  :)

--- End quote ---

Given that you're talking about a device with a motor, I'd suggest triple-checking that it will run happily on 60 Hz power (i.e. some motorsódepending on designóare frequency-agnostic or use frequency-agnostic controllers, some motors are perfectly content to run 20% faster than originally intended and will do so indefinitely, and some motors would let the magic smoke out in fairly short order).

-Russ

David Allred:
Pretty sure that the motor is just a solenoid type.  And is rated for 50/60 hz.  Getting a cheap Amazon step-up transformer.  The pump only makes 37w.

Kevin Graf:
Many older British components were designed for 230 Volts. Now days it's common for US supplies to be above 240 Volts. A 230 Volt transformer  might not be happy at 245 Volts.

Daniel Levi:

--- Quote from: Kevin Graf on March 25, 2024, 09:11:37 AM ---Many older British components were designed for 230 Volts. Now days it's common for US supplies to be above 240 Volts. A 230 Volt transformer  might not be happy at 245 Volts.

--- End quote ---

Newer stuff will be designed for 230V as that's the harmonised European/EU standard, power in the UK used to be rated at 240V nominal and a lot of it still is or can be higher.
The EU/European standard allows for the older 220V and 240V standards as part of the tolerance allowed. For old valve based stuff making sure it was set to the correct voltage was very important as you would risk damaging the valve filaments if the voltage feeding them was too high, and naturally on a transformer based supply the output voltage followed the input voltage.

David Allred:
The 100w transformer didn't even last an hour before getting so hot it blistered the case.  The transformer manufacturer recommends load + 50% for continuous use... which would be under 55w.
Huh.  I thought all Chinese specs and ratings were spot on.  ::) ::) ::)
Maybe it is actually (load + 50%)x2. ;)

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