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Outdoor battery terminal protection ???

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Riley Casey:
Ive just acquired a digital thermometer that has a remote sensor. I'd like to install it on a porch about 200 yards from the ocean. Virtually all metal outdoors corrodes here sooner than later. The sensor runs on a pair of AAA batteries and I'm fishing for ideas for keeping the battery terminals from corroding. Would bulb grease work in this low voltage application? Thought about just putting it in a zip lock bag but I suspect that would interfere with the temperature accuracy or at least cause it to lag temperature changes to some unknown degree. Any suggestions?

John Roberts {JR}:
You might consider putting the remote inside a zip lock baggie. That should protect it from salty sea air and shouldn't materially impact RF or heat/cold.

JR

Bill Meeks:
Not sure anything will be 100% successful. I live nearly 100 miles inland from the ocean, and I had a remote outdoor sensor on my covered back porch. The terminals corroded over time no matter what I did. A little cleaning and light sanding would restore operation for a while, but then rinse and repeat until finally it just quit. I just resigned myself to purchasing a new remote sensor now and then from Amazon. Luckily I had a brand that was easy to get remote sensors for (either to add extra "zones" or to replace a bad one).

One issue with the plastic bag trick is you still can get condensation inside the bag and thus on the terminals when temperature changes shift the dewpoint.

John Roberts {JR}:

--- Quote from: Bill Meeks on March 12, 2024, 03:25:50 PM ---Not sure anything will be 100% successful. I live nearly 100 miles inland from the ocean, and I had a remote outdoor sensor on my covered back porch. The terminals corroded over time no matter what I did. A little cleaning and light sanding would restore operation for a while, but then rinse and repeat until finally it just quit. I just resigned myself to purchasing a new remote sensor now and then from Amazon. Luckily I had a brand that was easy to get remote sensors for (either to add extra "zones" or to replace a bad one).

One issue with the plastic bag trick is you still can get condensation inside the bag and thus on the terminals when temperature changes shift the dewpoint.

--- End quote ---
If the bag is dry inside when you seal it, moisture should not get in. Of course you could throw some uncooked rice inside to absorb moisture.

Or just buy new ones....

JR

Russell Ault:

--- Quote from: Riley Casey on March 12, 2024, 01:20:01 PM ---Ive just acquired a digital thermometer that has a remote sensor. I'd like to install it on a porch about 200 yards from the ocean. Virtually all metal outdoors corrodes here sooner than later. The sensor runs on a pair of AAA batteries and I'm fishing for ideas for keeping the battery terminals from corroding. Would bulb grease work in this low voltage application? Thought about just putting it in a zip lock bag but I suspect that would interfere with the temperature accuracy or at least cause it to lag temperature changes to some unknown degree. Any suggestions?

--- End quote ---

How often do the batteries need to be replaced? Could you surround the contacts (or even fill up the battery compartment) with some kind of waterproof-but-relatively-easy-to-remove sealant? (A quick search led me to something called "DAP Draft Attack" as an example, but I'm sure there are many similar products out there.)

-Russ

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