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Steve-White:
* Digital Mixers
* Digital System Controllers
* DMX Control
* LED Lighting
* Neo Magnets in Loudspeakers
* Switching PSU Amplifiers
* Scalability in Loudspeaker Format
* Digitized Music Files

Frank Koenig:
Digital mixers, of course.

But Iíll add something a bit more subtle which is the new freedom in loudspeaker design made possible by cheap and capable digital processing. Back in the day great effort went into designing speaker drivers and systems that had inherently flat frequency response as it was difficult to correct and was expected by the market. These days flat on-axis response can be ignored (within reason) and the resulting flexibility can be devoted to optimizing other characteristic such as polar response, power output, efficiency and size/weight. The ability to build-in this response correction along with sophisticated overload protection systems (limiters) has made speakers better sounding, easier to deploy and more resistant to abuse and accidents.

--Frank

Matthew Knischewsky:
-The pin 1 noise problem has been solved;

-Standardized analog interconnect. Most equipment that didn't follow the XLR pin 2 hot standard has been retired by now. Same goes for analog inserts on consoles (ring send, anyone?) not that there are many left anymore... I used to have to carry a lot of adapters or make custom cables!

-Access to information. It's easy to look up specs, owners manual, quick start guides or even get in contact with the manufacturer these days. I remember being in the middle of a field in 2003 on a cell phone that barely had any coverage having someone at the shop dig up a paper copy of the owners manual and read it back to me so I could find out why the VCAs and mute groups on an unfamiliar A&H didn't seem to be working as expected. There are so many other examples of things that you either had to know, or had to guess at why something wasn't behaving as you had anticipated.

Chris Hindle:

--- Quote from: Matthew Knischewsky on March 03, 2024, 11:08:20 AM ---
-Access to information. It's easy to look up specs, owners manual, quick start guides or even get in contact with the manufacturer these days. I remember being in the middle of a field in 2003 on a cell phone that barely had any coverage having someone at the shop dig up a paper copy of the owners manual and read it back to me so I could find out why the VCAs and mute groups on an unfamiliar A&H didn't seem to be working as expected. There are so many other examples of things that you either had to know, or had to guess at why something wasn't behaving as you had anticipated.

--- End quote ---

+100.  I started out carrying a catalog case with ALL the manuals to my gear. When I rented something, I'd ask for the manual.  Just because, well, you know.
It was handy with "guest engineers" from time to time. "Here, RTFM!"

No one has to think anymore. Just google it.  The correct answer is probably one of the first 3 hits.
Help, or hindrance to gaining true knowledge?  You decide.

Chris.

Mike Caldwell:

--- Quote from: Tim McCulloch on March 02, 2024, 12:25:18 AM ---
Brian, I think part of it goes to how people consume audio most of the time:  some kind of ear bud, maybe a car system linked to their phone, and the mix is often "optimized" for the ear bud, so compressed to death, exaggerated bass and HF.  If that's how the live sound persons are getting their sonic references, we're screwed.

--- End quote ---

+100.....and they think they need to use every on board and external processing plug in insert available just to create an mix.

Speaking of inserts I going to say that at most we are one generation away from a sound person knowing what to do with an insert rack fantail and an analog mixer.

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