Church and H.O.W. Forums for HOW Sound and AV - Your Displayed Name Must Be Your Real Full Name To Post In The Church and HOW Forums > Church Sound

windows audio routing a wireless gaming headset

(1/3) > >>

john McBride:
Hello,

I am experimenting with adding a windows laptop and gaming headset to our rig.

So a windows laptop, a wireless gaming headset (with dongle) and a behringer uca222 line level usb interface provides four devices :

--speaker output (gaming headset headphones)
--microphone input (gaming headset microphone)
--line level input (uca222 rca inputs)
--line level output (uca222 rca outputs)

My goal is to set up two separate audio streams.

Stream one routes the wireless gaming mic to the uca222 output to a mixer input. This is for speech or vocals and is mixed into everything else on the mixer bus.

Stream two routes the final mixer bus monitor output (connected to the uca222 input rca jacks) to the gaming headset headphones.

The laptop uses windows 10 and I don't see any native means of simply routing two separate audio streams this way. I do not want them mixed together in the laptop.

So I have read a little bit about Jack audio, which is free and seems to provide this time of capability, but it also appears to need an application between the endpoints.

There are also commercial products that provide virtual cables and audio repeater applications to pass the audio through.

So my questions are ...

Am I doing something that seems reasonable from a hardware and software point of view?

If so, has anyone used Jack or some other similar software product to create isolated audio routes and pass audio streams through them?

If so, could you describe the software and bird's eye view of how the endpoints and repeaters are configured?

Regards,
John

PS: The headset dongle is advertised as 2.4 Ghz and I don't believe it uses bluetooth. We have a rode wireless go at the same frequency but I'll test them together later.

Scott Holtzman:

--- Quote from: john McBride on December 24, 2023, 11:41:02 PM ---Hello,

I am experimenting with adding a windows laptop and gaming headset to our rig.

So a windows laptop, a wireless gaming headset (with dongle) and a behringer uca222 line level usb interface provides four devices :

--speaker output (gaming headset headphones)
--microphone input (gaming headset microphone)
--line level input (uca222 rca inputs)
--line level output (uca222 rca outputs)

My goal is to set up two separate audio streams.

Stream one routes the wireless gaming mic to the uca222 output to a mixer input. This is for speech or vocals and is mixed into everything else on the mixer bus.

Stream two routes the final mixer bus monitor output (connected to the uca222 input rca jacks) to the gaming headset headphones.

The laptop uses windows 10 and I don't see any native means of simply routing two separate audio streams this way. I do not want them mixed together in the laptop.

So I have read a little bit about Jack audio, which is free and seems to provide this time of capability, but it also appears to need an application between the endpoints.

There are also commercial products that provide virtual cables and audio repeater applications to pass the audio through.

So my questions are ...

Am I doing something that seems reasonable from a hardware and software point of view?

If so, has anyone used Jack or some other similar software product to create isolated audio routes and pass audio streams through them?

If so, could you describe the software and bird's eye view of how the endpoints and repeaters are configured?

Regards,
John

PS: The headset dongle is advertised as 2.4 Ghz and I don't believe it uses bluetooth. We have a rode wireless go at the same frequency but I'll test them together later.

--- End quote ---
Using the 2.4Ghz wireless will be a disaster. That's the same frequency as Wifi.  Consumer wireless does not do a good job of rejecting interference as commercial gear.  I think the mission is failed.


What is the purpose of routing the monitor bus through the computer?  If you don't need to then you will save some money.


Just because the device has all of the jacks doesn't mean that they can be used concurrently.  It is a two channel device.  Two in and two out.  It has no means of bridging any inputs or outputs irrespective of any software.  I thought Jack was a Linux app BTW.  Linux is a great environment to do these types of things in my opinion.  I am not an MS fan.  If you are going to run MS software why choose an end of life package.  Windows 11 is current.


If you need two more inputs or outputs you need another audio interface.


You can run many of those concurrently.



john McBride:

--- Quote from: Scott Holtzman on December 25, 2023, 03:43:12 AM ---Using the 2.4Ghz wireless will be a disaster. That's the same frequency as Wifi.  Consumer wireless does not do a good job of rejecting interference as commercial gear.  I think the mission is failed.
--- End quote ---

It's not professional audio but it is a highly rated commercial product with thousands sold by amazon, best buy, and target. Certainly some gamers have wifi and wifi supports channels or else apartments etc. would be the actual disaster.



--- Quote --- What is the purpose of routing the monitor bus through the computer?  If you don't need to then you will save some money.
--- End quote ---

The wearer wants to hear the final mix in the gaming headset headphones.


--- Quote ---Just because the device has all of the jacks doesn't mean that they can be used concurrently.  It is a two channel device.  Two in and two out.  It has no means of bridging any inputs or outputs irrespective of any software.
--- End quote ---

I don't see how this statement can be true given the many usb audio devices with 16+ channels that plug 'n' play with windows.


--- Quote --- I thought Jack was a Linux app BTW.  Linux is a great environment to do these types of things in my opinion.  I am not an MS fan.  If you are going to run MS software why choose an end of life package.  Windows 11 is current.
--- End quote ---

Jack is multi-platform and not all pcs can be upgraded to windows 11.


--- Quote ---If you need two more inputs or outputs you need another audio interface.
--- End quote ---

there are two inputs and two outputs, not sure why any additional would be needed.


--- Quote ---You can run many of those concurrently.

--- End quote ---

I am hoping to route them as described in the original post. Many products claim the capability to do this for windows versions from 7-11.

Scott Holtzman:

--- Quote from: john McBride on December 25, 2023, 03:54:57 PM ---It's not professional audio but it is a highly rated commercial product with thousands sold by amazon, best buy, and target. Certainly some gamers have wifi and wifi supports channels or else apartments etc. would be the actual disaster.


The wearer wants to hear the final mix in the gaming headset headphones.  Why can't the mix go straight to the headset

I don't see how this statement can be true given the many usb audio devices with 16+ channels that plug 'n' play with windows.  If you don't like my answers you can go to a non-professional board and get them.  Sure there are 16 channel devices,  I have one and it works great.  I also have the Behringer and it's two channels.  Have you consulted the manual?

Jack is multi-platform and not all pcs can be upgraded to windows 11.  Great have you loaded it and seen if it works.  A write up on the product would be awesome.  The is a TPC switch you can flip. I am running it on a 2k

there are two inputs and two outputs, not sure why any additional would be needed.  I explained that above, the device is two channels.  Each jack does not have a direct DSP connection.

I am hoping to route them as described in the original post. Many products claim the capability to do this for windows versions from 7-11.  Ok Does the Behringer?

--- End quote ---

Tim Weaver:
You could probably do this using Dante Via, but that assumes you have a dante card (or at least an avio) at the mixer.

Dante Via can grab inputs and outputs from different pieces of software and wang-jangle them all together on the network.



BTW, I’m on Win10 everywhere too. I hate how much Win11 tries to gamify everything and there seems to be a lot of useless crap that you just can’t turn off. If its a work or presentation machine, its Win10 for me.

Navigation

[0] Message Index

[#] Next page

Go to full version