Sound Reinforcement - Forums for Live Sound Professionals - Your Displayed Name Must Be Your Real Full Name To Post In The Live Sound Forums > LAB: The Classic Live Audio Board

Multi compressors and limiters🥴

(1/6) > >>

lindsay Dean:
Working for a new church, before sound check I start looking over settings etc. The last tech had hard compression on each input, hard compression on the output of the console to the main processor, hard compression on both of the inputs to the live stream, on the input channels to the live stream console and compressors on the output to the digital interface. Then I go into the recording software it has multiple limiters and comp.
Somebody splain to me why.

Helge A Bentsen:
Mixing towards a LUFS target?

Russell Ault:

--- Quote from: lindsay Dean on November 20, 2023, 01:37:35 PM ---Working for a new church
before sound check I start looking over settings etc
The last tech had hard compression on each input ,
hard compression on the output of the console to the main processor
Hard compression on both of the inputs to the live stream
on the input channels to the live stream console
and compressors on the output to the digital interface
then I go into the recording software it has multiple limiters and comp
Somebody splain to me why

--- End quote ---

I agree with Helge about hitting LUFS targets on the streaming side of things (YouTube, for example, uses a LUFS target of only -14, which can be quite challenging to achieve), but it's a little more surprising on the reinforcement side. I guess the question is, how do you define "hard compression"?

-Russ

Tim Weaver:
I am guilty of using serial compression.  Its just how I've developed my "sound" over the years and with digital desks and plugins it just gets easier and easier. I love the polished "pop" sounding vocals you can achieve running something like an 1176 into an La2a. I will also generally make a pass through a multiband comp and/or de-esser as well.

All of that eventually hits a master buss comp at a very low ratio.

what I don't do is squash any of these very hard. They all have their place and I find it to be practically inaudible yet that vocal can really sit on top of a mix quite well.

I guess what I'm saying is.... How did it sound?

Bill Meeks:
I agree with what Tim said.

Hard compression needs some number given with it as that can be a subjective thing. One person's "hard" is another's "spanking it". Chris Lord-Alge is known for using copious amounts of compression in his mixes. Of course he is not doing live sound, he is mixing studio recordings. The biggest issue with more compression in live sound is the potential for feedback when the singing or music stops, and the increased level of stage noise bleed- both of these a consequence of the required make-up gain with high compression levels.

I agree that hard compression on the stereo bus of a live mix is not good. But a little low-ratio "gluing" with bus compression just kissing it a bit can be beneficial I think. Something like -1 dB or so with maybe the occasional peak to -3 dB. Almost every popular pop and rock record known to man has been passed through an SSL Master Bus Compressor during its creation ... :). If you want to "make it sound like the record", then you might need a little gentle compression. Depends on what your mixing target is, though. Cover bands or contemporary worship praise bands might be aiming to "make it sound like the record".

Navigation

[0] Message Index

[#] Next page

Go to full version