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Author Topic: Headphones: "flat" frequency response phones - Good isolation - whatcha using?  (Read 978 times)

frank kayser

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So I was ag a gig yesterday on a Soundcraft VI desk - plugged in phones to solo some vocal channels.  Couldn't find the VI controls quickly, so took them off.  Once I found the controls, went to put them on, and SNAP! the headband broke.


So I'm in the market for new phones.  I'm looking for phones with good isolation and flat... My last phones lasted over at least 5 years, so I'm not too tough on them, but rugged surely won't hurt.


So, whatcha using?  Recommend?  I'd like to say price is no object, but in reality, it is.


thanks
frank
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Steve Ferreira

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I really like the Sony MDR-7506
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Chris Hindle

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So I was ag a gig yesterday on a Soundcraft VI desk - plugged in phones to solo some vocal channels.  Couldn't find the VI controls quickly, so took them off.  Once I found the controls, went to put them on, and SNAP! the headband broke.


So I'm in the market for new phones.  I'm looking for phones with good isolation and flat... My last phones lasted over at least 5 years, so I'm not too tough on them, but rugged surely won't hurt.


So, whatcha using?  Recommend?  I'd like to say price is no object, but in reality, it is.


thanks
frank
GK-Music UltraPhones.
Sony 7506 drivers mounted in Peltor H-10 shooters muffs.
29dB isolation, and EVERYONE knows what 7506 sounds like. Not flat for sure, but quite workable.
Mine are going on 15 years now. New surrounds are like 15 bucks a set.
The Sony over the ear that I had previous cost 120 for a set of cushions.
Did that repair once. Next time (within 2 years), I bought the UltraPhones.
Chris.
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Ya, Whatever. Just throw a '57 on it, and get off my stage.

Scott Helmke

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Dave Rat makes a big deal out of having flat headphones (which MDR-7506 definitely ain't), maybe he's done a YouTube video about that?
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Art Welter

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Dave Rat makes a big deal out of having flat headphones (which MDR-7506 definitely ain't), maybe he's done a YouTube video about that?
I'd make a much bigger deal over isolation compared to flat response for live use. That said, the Sony MD-7506 is "flat enough" as can be seen in comparison to the Beyerdynamic DT770 Pro, costing about twice as much with less unit to unit consistency.

GK Ultraphones using MD-7506 elements were the best audio investment I'd ever made, just wish I'd started using them before hearing damage had already set in. Being able to hear the phones clearly at 90dB when the noise level is 120dB is a real relief.
They provide enough isolation that you can hear slight angle and placement differences while adjusting microphones on stage with the drummer hammering away while listening at a comfortable level.

Art


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John Schalk

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If you really want to go down the rabbit hole about headphones then I suggest that you point your browser to this link on the Audio Science Review forum:

https://www.audiosciencereview.com/forum/index.php?forums/headphones-and-headphone-amplifier-reviews.57/

There you will find lots of discussion about how to measure headphones starting with the concept that flat may not be what you want.  Search for threads that discuss the "Harmon Curve" which attempts to take into account how the physical properties of our ears impacts the frequency response of what we hear.  Note that this forum relies heavily on objective measurements rather than subjective listening tests.  FWIW I ended up with a $400 pair of Sennheisers, but they are an open back design that isn't suitable for live sound.  I was shopping for something I could use at home for virtual sound checks and personal monitoring in a quiet environment.
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Jeff M Hague

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So I was ag a gig yesterday on a Soundcraft VI desk - plugged in phones to solo some vocal channels.  Couldn't find the VI controls quickly, so took them off.  Once I found the controls, went to put them on, and SNAP! the headband broke.


So I'm in the market for new phones.  I'm looking for phones with good isolation and flat... My last phones lasted over at least 5 years, so I'm not too tough on them, but rugged surely won't hurt.


So, whatcha using?  Recommend?  I'd like to say price is no object, but in reality, it is.


thanks
frank

Cant say how flat they are but Ive been real happy with Sennheiser HD300s for about 3 years now. I replaced a 10 year old pair of HD280s with these. They sound good, good isolation, they fit nicely and they handle the road well.
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Jeff

Dan Richardson

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GK-Music UltraPhones.
Sony 7506 drivers mounted in Peltor H-10 shooters muffs.

I love my UltraPhones for the isolation, but I wouldn't say they sound even remotely good. Harsh and thin. I'm guessing it's because the drivers are much farther from my ears than they're designed to be. They're great for judging how much ambient mic to add to a live stream. I wish the cable was detachable.

My old Sennheiser HD280Pro phones sound way more accurate, and have decent isolation. Have to be careful of overexcursion, though. Kicks are liable to bottom them out.
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The best sound system is no sound system. Everything else is compromise.

Woody Nuss

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Audio-Technica ATH-M50
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Russell Ault

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{...} SNAP! the headband broke. {...} So, whatcha using?  {...}

For me it depends on the application. My "PFL" cans (which are now approaching 20 years old) are from the Fostex RP line. They don't to have the most isolation, and they can be tricky to drive (most consoles don't seem to have a problem, but USB interfaces can), but they're solidly constructed (the headband is entirely metal-reinforced), they open up large enough to sit comfortably around the neck while quickly listening to something in one ear, and they have a reasonably-flat frequency response.

My "stream-mixing" cans are HD280Pros (mostly for the better isolation).

-Russ
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Dave Pluke

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My old Sennheiser HD280Pro phones sound way more accurate, and have decent isolation.

I typically only use headphones for (temporary) troubleshooting and my Senny HD280Pros work well for that. If mixing for stream or broadcast, I'll use Shure SRH940 cans.

Dave
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