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Author Topic: Severe wind damage at music festival in Spain  (Read 704 times)

John Fruits

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John Fruits

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Re: Severe wind damage at music festival in Spain
« Reply #1 on: August 13, 2022, 10:55:08 AM »

https://www.cnn.com/2022/08/13/europe/spain-medusa-festival-death-intl/index.html
Talk about hot gusty winds, at 3am 50mph and almost 105 degrees fahrenheit.
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"The music business is a cruel and shallow money trench, a long plastic hallway where thieves and pimps run free, and good men die like dogs.  There's also a negative side."-Hunter S. Thompson

Dave Garoutte

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Re: Severe wind damage at music festival in Spain
« Reply #2 on: August 15, 2022, 02:36:50 PM »

https://www.cnn.com/2022/08/13/europe/spain-medusa-festival-death-intl/index.html
Talk about hot gusty winds, at 3am 50mph and almost 105 degrees fahrenheit.
Lucky there was no fire.  Those winds turn a regular blaze into an inferno, as happened in Santa Rosa here in norCal.
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John Roberts {JR}

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Re: Severe wind damage at music festival in Spain
« Reply #3 on: August 15, 2022, 02:46:27 PM »

A woman in SC was killed by a beach umbrella blown by the wind that speared her in the chest. Wind kills.

JR
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Tim McCulloch

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Re: Severe wind damage at music festival in Spain
« Reply #4 on: August 15, 2022, 03:37:42 PM »

The Indiana State Fair roof failure 11 years ago (Aug 13) was supposed to be the definitive failure that would redefine regulations, engineering, and building of temporary demountable entertainment structures.  From a standards standpoint, it was.  The rest?  Meh...

What seems to be lacking is the will to 'over-engineer' such structures for weather-related failures that are viewed as "once in 100 years" or "once in a lifetime" events.  While statistically these numbers are not supported (whose life time, a tortoise or a hamster?), events over the last 20 years indicate that these weather events are not as rare as hoped.

Living out here on the Plains, where a 'moderately windy day' is a full gale to others (and violent storms fairly frequent), I'm often surprised at how poorly many outdoor entertainment structures are designed and executed in other locales.

As for the specifics of what happened in Spain... I'm eager to hear the conclusions of the investigations.
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Russell Ault

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Re: Severe wind damage at music festival in Spain
« Reply #5 on: August 15, 2022, 03:52:08 PM »

{...} As for the specifics of what happened in Spain... I'm eager to hear the conclusions of the investigations.

Me too. The few videos/photos I've seen haven't been particularly clear, but it almost looks like the failure was more about decorative elements being blown around than anything structural? This just doesn't seem like a "typical" (shudder) stage collapse (if for no other reason than that it looked like the PA was still in the air).

-Russ
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Doug Fowler

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Re: Severe wind damage at music festival in Spain
« Reply #6 on: August 15, 2022, 03:58:14 PM »

Some of these EDM events have decided to use decorative set pieces flanking the stage rather than use millions of dollars in production equipment to create effects (lasers, pyro, video, you name it).  Set pieces blowing around during a wind event seems plausible.


Me too. The few videos/photos I've seen haven't been particularly clear, but it almost looks like the failure was more about decorative elements being blown around than anything structural? This just doesn't seem like a "typical" (shudder) stage collapse (if for no other reason than that it looked like the PA was still in the air).

-Russ
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Rick Earl

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Re: Severe wind damage at music festival in Spain
« Reply #7 on: August 15, 2022, 04:49:32 PM »

The Indiana State Fair roof failure 11 years ago (Aug 13) was supposed to be the definitive failure that would redefine regulations, engineering, and building of temporary demountable entertainment structures.  From a standards standpoint, it was.  The rest?  Meh...

What seems to be lacking is the will to 'over-engineer' such structures for weather-related failures that are viewed as "once in 100 years" or "once in a lifetime" events.  While statistically these numbers are not supported (whose life time, a tortoise or a hamster?), events over the last 20 years indicate that these weather events are not as rare as hoped.

Living out here on the Plains, where a 'moderately windy day' is a full gale to others (and violent storms fairly frequent), I'm often surprised at how poorly many outdoor entertainment structures are designed and executed in other locales.

As for the specifics of what happened in Spain... I'm eager to hear the conclusions of the investigations.

I don't think it is over engineering as much as Engineering- period, and then develop a weather action plan based on that engineering.  Any system will fail eventually, we just need to know at what point. Laws here require even temporary structures to be built for a percentage of the wind load for a permanent structure.  For here, that is 90 miles per-hour.    Any structure we build has an engineer's stamp and a weather action plan, or it doesn't get done.  We also pay for a weather monitoring service to help us with those decisions.    We activated the weather action plan twice for one of our outdoor venues.  Chairs were blown around and tarps flew, but we had evacuated, so nobody got hurt.  The stage and roof were unscathed.  It works, it just has to be implemented.  Cost wise, we were within a few thousand dollars over a non engineered / weather plan  system offered by another company, but I also got a custom structure, not a stock "roof" built by a truss company.   I know promoters are all about making a buck, but in most of these cases, the losses outweigh the additional cost safety would have provided. 
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Brian Jojade

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Re: Severe wind damage at music festival in Spain
« Reply #8 on: August 15, 2022, 07:28:41 PM »

Rain - doesn't bother me.  Snow - meh, a little concern, but that's usually slow moving, so I'm not around when it causes problems.

Lightning? Yeah, that scares me a little bit, but when storms approach, finding a safe place is usually pretty easy to do.

Now wind.  Wind scares the crap out of me at events.  I've been through plenty of storms now and when stuff starts flying around, it's dangerous EVERYWHERE.  Even with well built structures, there can be bits and pieces that fly around and can hurt you.

The most important thing for an event is having an evacuation plan.  The nice thing is that these days, we do have access to better weather forecasts and can see a storm approaching with pretty good accuracy.  It would be pretty rare for super strong winds to just crop out of nowhere.

I won't do ANY outdoor events that don't include a plan for weather, and if damaging wind is predicted, that plan MUST include evacuation, and the decision to evacuate must come with enough warning to get people out before the storm arrives.

If a structure collapses and nobody is in it, it's just a mess.  If there are still people around, it's potentially deadly.

Yes, it's tough sometimes to get promoters to be willing to call off a show 30 minutes before it even starts raining, but when you don't do that is when bad things happen.
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Brian Jojade

Adam Kane

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Re: Severe wind damage at music festival in Spain
« Reply #9 on: August 21, 2022, 05:16:38 PM »

Rain - doesn't bother me.  Snow - meh, a little concern, but that's usually slow moving, so I'm not around when it causes problems.

Lightning? Yeah, that scares me a little bit, but when storms approach, finding a safe place is usually pretty easy to do.

Now wind.  Wind scares the crap out of me at events.  I've been through plenty of storms now and when stuff starts flying around, it's dangerous EVERYWHERE.  Even with well built structures, there can be bits and pieces that fly around and can hurt you.

The most important thing for an event is having an evacuation plan.  The nice thing is that these days, we do have access to better weather forecasts and can see a storm approaching with pretty good accuracy.  It would be pretty rare for super strong winds to just crop out of nowhere.

I won't do ANY outdoor events that don't include a plan for weather, and if damaging wind is predicted, that plan MUST include evacuation, and the decision to evacuate must come with enough warning to get people out before the storm arrives.

If a structure collapses and nobody is in it, it's just a mess.  If there are still people around, it's potentially deadly.

Yes, it's tough sometimes to get promoters to be willing to call off a show 30 minutes before it even starts raining, but when you don't do that is when bad things happen.

Agree 100%.

The one thing that seems to be lacking at many (maybe most?) events is having someone(s) who has the final say in when to shut down/evacuate that has ZERO financial skin in the game. Anyone who stands to lose money in the event of a shutdown will have skewed judgement at best.
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ProSoundWeb Community

Re: Severe wind damage at music festival in Spain
« Reply #9 on: August 21, 2022, 05:16:38 PM »


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