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Author Topic: Heavy Duty Tripod  (Read 883 times)

Bobby Gonzales

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Heavy Duty Tripod
« on: August 10, 2022, 09:43:00 PM »

Hello,
 I'm trying to put a heavy speaker on a tripod. The speaker weighs around a 150 pounds.. I've tried  Regular tripods that claim they can handle the weight but they feel very unstable.  Does anyone know any tripods that are built for heavier speakers?
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Bradford "BJ" James

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Re: Heavy Duty Tripod
« Reply #1 on: August 10, 2022, 11:50:07 PM »

ST132 or DT3800 or DT3900
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Bobby Gonzales

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Re: Heavy Duty Tripod
« Reply #2 on: August 11, 2022, 08:02:15 PM »

ST132 or DT3800 or DT3900

 These are perfect. This was exactly what I was looking for. Thank you
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John Schalk

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Re: Heavy Duty Tripod
« Reply #3 on: August 12, 2022, 11:39:37 AM »

I purchased two DT3800s from PSSL.com this summer to use as front light trees.  However, I have used them twice to hold my front speakers, which weigh 65lbs, and I really like these stands.  They are very stable and the crank makes it super easy to raise and lower heavy loads.  The main weakness I've found so far is the thin wire ring they come with that you have to pull on to release the pin to extend the legs.  Here are some numbers for the DT3800:

Min height 73" - This is how high you'll have to lift your 150lb speaker to get it onto the stand
Max height without extension ~11' - The stand has a single post, but it comes with an insert that can be extended
Max total height ~12' 6" - This is with the insert extended to its highest pin position.  Note, using the insert increases the lift over height.
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Dave Garoutte

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Re: Heavy Duty Tripod
« Reply #4 on: August 12, 2022, 01:56:22 PM »

These are perfect. This was exactly what I was looking for. Thank you
If you are going up high, you should have some sort of secondary restraint; it will be very top heavy. 
I have the 3900 which I now love.  But I had to disassemble it to debur all the razor sharp edges on the extrusions before it would work smoothly (and safely).  I don't know if that's normal for these, or if it was a late friday part.
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Tim McCulloch

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Re: Heavy Duty Tripod
« Reply #5 on: August 12, 2022, 02:26:49 PM »

I think putting a 150 lbs speaker on a tripod-style stand is a really bad idea, considering you need to perform a 6 ft high dead lift.  The tripod *may* be sufficiently butch to hold the speaker, but... getting it up there is where people will get hurt and property will get damaged.

I'm also very leery of putting 150 lbs on a stand between 6-11 ft high without some other means of staying the assembly.  One drunk dancer hitting this could tip it over with serious potential consequences.

Why must THIS loudspeaker be used, and/or why must it be on a tripod stand?
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Scott Holtzman

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Re: Heavy Duty Tripod
« Reply #6 on: August 12, 2022, 04:21:30 PM »

I think putting a 150 lbs speaker on a tripod-style stand is a really bad idea, considering you need to perform a 6 ft high dead lift.  The tripod *may* be sufficiently butch to hold the speaker, but... getting it up there is where people will get hurt and property will get damaged.

I'm also very leery of putting 150 lbs on a stand between 6-11 ft high without some other means of staying the assembly.  One drunk dancer hitting this could tip it over with serious potential consequences.

Why must THIS loudspeaker be used, and/or why must it be on a tripod stand?


Couple of things, those legs are really short compared to the ST-132.  You need to hang as many saddle bags as you can and splay the legs out as far as can. 


Second, especially if you have a helper, you can tilt it down, put the load on and walk it up.  Works great.


Lastly, you could get two pieces of soffit truss with a 3' aluminum base.  They make a speaker center pin plate for the top.  You can walk that up easier, sand bag the base then wrap it in in black cloth.  Toss in a truss warmer light and you are rocking and rolling.  Put a wireless fixture in there (or three) and you could have a slick effect doing chases.  For normal use just warm the truss of course.  You could use wired fixtures of course just makes setup and tear down go faster.   
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Scott AKA "Skyking" Holtzman

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Jeremy Young

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Re: Heavy Duty Tripod
« Reply #7 on: August 12, 2022, 09:13:38 PM »

Happy ST-132 user here.  I've made use of the levelling leg numerous times outdoors.  It's heavy but... that's the point. 
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John Schalk

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Re: Heavy Duty Tripod
« Reply #8 on: August 13, 2022, 11:08:14 AM »

Couple of things, those legs are really short compared to the ST-132.  You need to hang as many saddle bags as you can and splay the legs out as far as can.
One of the best features of the DT3800 is how stable it is.  I chalk that up to the fact that the legs are squared off and thus have a much large contact patch with the ground than what you get with a tripod stand comprised of round aluminum tubes.  The stated base of the stand is only 45" but these things are really solid.  The first time I set it up and the gave it the push test, it didn't budge.  No scooting or tipping at all.  I'm not saying that I'd put 150lbs up on one without any additional support, but if you haven't used one, it's hard to understand just how much more solid they feel than my tall Ultimate Telelock stands. 
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Scott Holtzman

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Re: Heavy Duty Tripod
« Reply #9 on: August 13, 2022, 08:26:02 PM »

One of the best features of the DT3800 is how stable it is.  I chalk that up to the fact that the legs are squared off and thus have a much large contact patch with the ground than what you get with a tripod stand comprised of round aluminum tubes.  The stated base of the stand is only 45" but these things are really solid.  The first time I set it up and the gave it the push test, it didn't budge.  No scooting or tipping at all.  I'm not saying that I'd put 150lbs up on one without any additional support, but if you haven't used one, it's hard to understand just how much more solid they feel than my tall Ultimate Telelock stands.


Let's be clear the SR-132 are made of square tubing for the legs and a very heavy gauge pipe for the middle.  It also uses a winch to raise it.  Different class, weight and of course price than the telelock's.  I have not used a Dt3800 I see in the specs it is 30% less money and supports 176lb vs 220 for the ST-132 which I assume is up market for Global.

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Scott AKA "Skyking" Holtzman

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Re: Heavy Duty Tripod
« Reply #9 on: August 13, 2022, 08:26:02 PM »


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