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Author Topic: Sensory sensitive performance  (Read 560 times)

Justice C. Bigler

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Sensory sensitive performance
« on: July 17, 2022, 12:13:08 AM »

Anyone ever work on a sensory sensitive performance? Like something for a theatre full of autistic kids?


Are there any guidelines that you were given other than just to mix quieter? Any specific SPL target that you needed to hit?
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Justice C. Bigler
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Jeff Lelko

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Re: Sensory sensitive performance
« Reply #1 on: July 17, 2022, 12:38:22 AM »

Anyone ever work on a sensory sensitive performance? Like something for a theatre full of autistic kids?

Are there any guidelines that you were given other than just to mix quieter? Any specific SPL target that you needed to hit?

My experience has always been more along the lines of restrictions on lighting and special effects.  Things like strobes, flashing, pyro, or anything jarring are usually the main concerns in these instances aside from just maintaining a comfortable volume level and not blasting the sound effects.  Hope this helps!
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Gary Greyhosky

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Re: Sensory sensitive performance
« Reply #2 on: July 17, 2022, 08:52:17 AM »

Anyone ever work on a sensory sensitive performance? Like something for a theatre full of autistic kids?


Are there any guidelines that you were given other than just to mix quieter? Any specific SPL target that you needed to hit?

My wife has worked with individuals with autism for 30 years. I showed here a number of video clips of the show. As with any audience, you'll get a wide variety of reactions to the show. Some will absolutely love it and some may have trouble processing what's happening. Since the entire performance is basically a sensory overload, it's impossible to say how some will respond. After viewing the video clips, she commented that parents /guardians will hopefully make an effort to understand what the show looks and sounds like and not attend if they feel that it may cause any sort of fear / panic / confusion. I did notice on the website that there is an information page addressing this exact issue. She also commented that it's great to see a group like this considering the needs of those with autism and other exceptionalities. She also said that it looks amazing and she now wants to see the show. LOL. I'm halfway between DC and Scranton, so maybe we'll end up at one of the performances. Best of luck with it and kudos to the production for doing this.
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Justice C. Bigler

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Re: Sensory sensitive performance
« Reply #3 on: July 17, 2022, 01:04:51 PM »

I'm halfway between DC and Scranton, so maybe we'll end up at one of the performances. Best of luck with it and kudos to the production for doing this.
We're in D.C. at the Kennedy Center for the next two weeks. Our sensory sensitive performance is scheduled for the Thursday matinee on July 28.


It all may be a moot point for me, since the Kennedy Center has a hard SPL limit of 90db C weighted for any peaks. That would be about a 20 db reduction in sound levels for me. So I may just have to run with front fills or something.
« Last Edit: July 17, 2022, 01:09:12 PM by Justice C. Bigler »
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Gary Greyhosky

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Re: Sensory sensitive performance
« Reply #4 on: July 17, 2022, 01:29:31 PM »

We're in D.C. at the Kennedy Center for the next two weeks. Our sensory sensitive performance is scheduled for the Thursday matinee on July 28.


It all may be a moot point for me, since the Kennedy Center has a hard SPL limit of 90db C weighted for any peaks. That would be about a 20 db reduction in sound levels for me. So I may just have to run with front fills or something.

Is the 90dB C limit for all shows there or just the sensory sensitive matinee? If it's for all shows there, I'm more likely to wait until you get to Scranton as I can only imagine that the impact of a show like yours would be severely compromised with spl limits that low. I was making 95dBa peaks 80' from the stage at an outdoor bluegrass festival last week and had several people ask if i could turn it up. I politely declined. I'm no volume junkie, but 90dBc peaks seem pretty strict, particularly on a show built around percussion. At any rate, best of luck with it.
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Scott Holtzman

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Re: Sensory sensitive performance
« Reply #5 on: July 17, 2022, 10:08:23 PM »

Anyone ever work on a sensory sensitive performance? Like something for a theatre full of autistic kids?


Are there any guidelines that you were given other than just to mix quieter? Any specific SPL target that you needed to hit?


Trans Siberian does one every year for Christmas, as noted the video walls are muted and the lighting is mostly static.

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Scott AKA "Skyking" Holtzman

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Re: Sensory sensitive performance
« Reply #5 on: July 17, 2022, 10:08:23 PM »


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