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Tim McCulloch:
If this is for more than a hobby with no intention of ever making a profit, buy/use whatever makes you happy.

If you're planning on making an income of any kind you need a BUSINESS PLAN.  I'm not sure what mentoring resources are available in the EU but I'm fairly certain they are available.  In the USA our federal Small Business Administration sponsored the Service Corps of Retired Executives (SCORE) that had volunteer mentors available.

At the very least, reading "Business Plans for Dummies" (or something similar) or finding help online with the process, will be most valuable.

I started out with a van full of PA that I engineered and hand built.  I undercharged for my services and discovered there was no money left for major repairs, buying new gear, or really doing much more than getting me to the gigs and paying for insurance.  My clients, who hired me because my fees were low, were the kind that would never be able to pay much more, and I was stuck because I couldn't move up to better paying work without money to invest in better gear.  I ended up selling most of it (at a loss, of course), doubled down on business education and started managing other peoples companies for them.  I've been with my current employer over 20 years...

So write a business plan.  Do a pro forma cash flow based on different fee structures and operating expenses.  Remember that the difference in cost for fixed assets (equipment) on a PER SHOW basis for cheap gear and better gear is actually pretty trivial when spread out over 300, 400 gigs over 5 years.  Your cost per show will depend on how many you do.

We have a couple of sayings here:  "buy once, cry once", and "the wrong product at the *right price* is still the wrong product."  These go hand in hand.  Buying loudspeakers you'll end up replacing before you can fully amortize the cost is an example of BOCO.  And you buy the cheap speakers because they're cheap... i.e., the wrong product.

Why BOCO is important:  I'll use JBL as an example... if you start with JRX or the cheapest EON system, you'll likely discover the technical, sonic, and customer acceptance limitations fairly fast.  JBL has the PRX line, which are better (performance, finish, weight, etc) but cost more.  If you were to upgrade to a PRX rig, you are spending more than DOUBLE.  If you've used the JRX to the point you've recovered your investment, you're still paying double.  Buying PRX first means you skip the first upgrade cycle completely.  Over the years I've found it a better use of my employer's money (and my own) to spend it on things we will not replace soon.

As for buying used gear, how much life some thing has remaining is always a guess.  That said, almost every large format loudspeaker in our inventory was purchased used.  Yes, we have had to spend money to maintain them but that's expected even with new equipment.  Warranties only pay to fix certain failures of materials, workmanship, or design, for a specified time, and general maintenance is the responsibility of the owner.  We were confident of the maintenance done by the previous owners but I understand that not everyone has the same experiences.

Have fun, good luck.

Tim Mc

Brian Jojade:

--- Quote from: Tim McCulloch on June 20, 2022, 12:46:24 PM ---As for buying used gear, how much life some thing has remaining is always a guess.  That said, almost every large format loudspeaker in our inventory was purchased used.  Yes, we have had to spend money to maintain them but that's expected even with new equipment. 

--- End quote ---

Higher end gear also tends to hold its value after initial depreciation much better than the flash in the pan entry level stuff.  Professionals don't care anywhere near as much about fancy looking grills, or fancy marketing that makes something look new and exciting.  If you buy high end used gear, you can often sell it for what you paid for (or sometimes more) even after many years of use.

I recently sold off some of my SRX700 series gear that I got over a decade ago for MORE than I originally paid for it. Of course inflation comes into play with that, but the fact that 10 year old speakers still command a high value is pretty amazing.  10 year old JRX cabinets you'd have a hard time giving away. :)

Doug Fowler:

--- Quote from: Brian Jojade on June 20, 2022, 10:39:25 PM ---Higher end gear also tends to hold its value after initial depreciation much better than the flash in the pan entry level stuff.  Professionals don't care anywhere near as much about fancy looking grills, or fancy marketing that makes something look new and exciting.  If you buy high end used gear, you can often sell it for what you paid for (or sometimes more) even after many years of use.

I recently sold off some of my SRX700 series gear that I got over a decade ago for MORE than I originally paid for it. Of course inflation comes into play with that, but the fact that 10 year old speakers still command a high value is pretty amazing.  10 year old JRX cabinets you'd have a hard time giving away. :)

--- End quote ---

But what about the blue LEDs?!?!?

lol

Brian Jojade:

--- Quote from: Doug Fowler on June 20, 2022, 11:25:06 PM ---But what about the blue LEDs?!?!?

lol

--- End quote ---

Fun in the 90's.  Now you need bluetooth to be trendy!

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