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Venue remodel: Sub bunkers?

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Doug Fowler:

--- Quote from: dave briar on June 21, 2021, 10:53:06 AM ---Yea Iím generally aware of that technique.  When we remodeled the basement here I hung the ceiling Sheetrock on sheet-metal brackets to decouple it from the floor joists above and as a carpenter (in a previous life) we built some interior walls using 2x6Ē top and bottom plates with alternating 2x4Ē studs so that the inside and outside Sheetrock only couple at the plates but Iím not sure how effective that would be for mitigating strong 30í waveforms.  Abundant mass seems to work better at that no?

No idea. The SynAudCon listserv might have ideas.
--- End quote ---

Tim McCulloch:
A plug for The Master Handbook of Acoustics, by F. Alton Everest and Ken Pohlman (5th ed).

dave briar:

--- Quote from: Tim McCulloch on June 21, 2021, 11:20:32 AM ---A plug for The Master Handbook of Acoustics, by F. Alton Everest and Ken Pohlman (5th ed).

--- End quote ---
Sixth edition due in August. Couldnít find a fifth edition but my questions are so basic Iím betting the forth edition (2000) will suffice ó especially for only $6.99 delivered.

Ivan Beaver:
Concrete is nice, but as others have said, hard to redo if the subs change

Don't worry about a couple of inches.  You don't want them to tight, in case you need to pull them out for repair or whatever.  Be sure you can get your hands around them.

Think in terms of wavelength.  A couple of inches with wavelengths that are generally between 10-30' long will not be noticeable.

Don't worry about putting any "filling" to reduce those reflections either, you can't make it thick enough.

You might want to put a "stop" on the rear to keep them from moving back to far and damaging the connector plug.

dave briar:

--- Quote from: Ivan Beaver on June 21, 2021, 02:57:14 PM ---Concrete is nice, but as others have said, hard to redo if the subs change

Don't worry about a couple of inches.  You don't want them to tight, in case you need to pull them out for repair or whatever.  Be sure you can get your hands around them.

Think in terms of wavelength.  A couple of inches with wavelengths that are generally between 10-30' long will not be noticeable.

Don't worry about putting any "filling" to reduce those reflections either, you can't make it thick enough.

You might want to put a "stop" on the rear to keep them from moving back to far and damaging the connector plug.

--- End quote ---
Google says the density of drywall is 724kg/m3 whereas concrete is 2,400kg/m3 but no question Sheetrock would be easier to build and modify.  If it were me the Sheetrock option seems much more workable (Iíve never been enthralled with working concrete) but if the owner wants to indulge in some creative bunker construction that will work too.

Understood on the non-criticality of spacing between the sub and bunker.  Agrees with what I suspected. 

Good advice on putting a spacer behind to protect the connectors as well. I just yesterday had to replace a XLRM on one of the outdoor subs because it got yanked too hard pulling the sub out of its too-low-of-clearance MDF/cement-board box.  Also had to replace a second cable used to daisy chain that sub to the next in line as that cable got scrunched/run over as the sub was pushed back into the box exposing the shield.  Allowing a bit more space between the Nexo and its bunker will allow more carefully controlled routing of its 12 gauge cable.

Thanks Ivan.

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