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Author Topic: Multitrack archiving  (Read 1713 times)

Alex Cheng

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Re: Multitrack archiving
« Reply #20 on: June 12, 2021, 03:26:46 AM »

I use Backblaze for backups - it's a pay one price regardless of how much you have to back up or how many attached drives. Restore can either be over the internet or they'll mail you a drive for $139. Restore your files, return the drive and your payment is returned.


One more vote for Backblaze. Good pricing, fantastic service, and Amazon S3 compatibility. They even go above and beyond and publish extended metrics on drive failures per manufacturer every year - an invaluable reference when purchasing disks for my personal use.
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Dan Richardson

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Re: Multitrack archiving
« Reply #21 on: June 12, 2021, 09:02:13 AM »

Who is multi tracking shows (Dante/USB/AVB/etc) to DAW, and how are you archiving after the gig?

I've multitracked nearly everything for years, directly into Reaper projects so all tracks are named on the fly. Adding video to many in the last two years and going forward. I have a QNAP RAID 6 file server with 8 6TB drives in it, and another at a lower RAID with 8 4TB drives in an out building as a backup. The near one is live 24/7. The remote boots up, runs drive tests, and shuts down every night.
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Eric Eskam

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Re: Multitrack archiving
« Reply #22 on: June 15, 2021, 04:26:08 PM »

I have a QNAP RAID 6 file server with 8 6TB drives in it, and another at a lower RAID with 8 4TB drives in an out building as a backup. The near one is live 24/7. The remote boots up, runs drive tests, and shuts down every night.

I just set a new QNAP TS-h973AX for a friend to consolidate a server onto (as a VM) and serve as file storage too for them.  Very impressive.  Their new QTS Hero version of their software is based on ZFS - and one thing that ZFS is awesome at is bitrot.  As long as you are mirroring or RAIDing disks, you get automatic and *continuous* bitrot detection.  If issues are detected, the parity information from your mirror or raid config is used to fix it on the fly.

Biggest reason to use ZFS, IMNSHO.

The downside to ZFS is it can be pretty resource intensive.  Keeping that in mind, to obtain max performance I bought a slightly bigger box so I could put in a pair of SSDs for cache and a second pair of SSDs for the System storage pool (system pool is automatically assigned to the first storage pool that gets created when you first set your box up).  If all you are doing is file sharing - and especially if you are just archiving files, then this level is not required.  Having said that, just having a pair of inexpensive 250GB SSDs dedicated to cache can make a substantial perf difference even if you put the system stuff on regular hard drives.  If you aren't interested in running virtual machines, but just doing file sharing/backups then they have ARM based units that are not quite half the cost of the one I referenced.  I use those at remote locations all the time.  And most of their units can take external expansion boxes so you can keep growing over time fairly economically without having to start over.

Its a steeper hardware cost for the QTS Hero edition, but the data protection ZFS brings is second to none - and with bigger hard drives they are packing more data into the same space; always makes me nervous. 

A final tip for your own cloud equivalent backup - if you have a willing friend/relative on the other side of the country, dropping a box at their house gives you great geographic diversity.  Letting them back their stuff up to it too can sweeten the pot :)  The built in Qnap stuff for networking two boxes across the Internet had some security issues earlier this year - I connect mine over my own VPNs (piVPN - great solution).  If they can be trusted, the built in Qnap cloud assisted utilities really are slick and plug n play able for mere mortals.  If they fixed the issues from earlier this year :p
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Scott Holtzman

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Re: Multitrack archiving
« Reply #23 on: June 17, 2021, 03:57:30 AM »

A plug for Amazon Web Services Simple Storage Service (AWS S3). They charge by the MB and it may be less than you think. I don't have huge audio files but all my pictures and other stuff I care about are backed up there and it runs around $2.50 / month. I love the command line interface. --Frank


I think we have talked about this before, you can push to Glacier, which you have to wait to "thaw" out.  It's really cheap.



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Scott AKA "Skyking" Holtzman

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drew gandy

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Re: Multitrack archiving
« Reply #24 on: June 18, 2021, 11:17:33 PM »

I prefer the idea of "mixed media" meaning that I want my data on at least two different kinds of media for long term storage. DVD is doable up to a certain size but for multitrack audio backup, Bluray is looking pretty good. Of course, for the longest term storage, transcribing it all to written music on acid free paper, stored in a long term controlled environment is one of the tried and true methods.

Whatever you do, don't give your archives to Universal Studios to store.  https://www.nytimes.com/2019/06/11/magazine/universal-fire-master-recordings.html

(I've heard that saving digital data to full page QR style codes on paper is actually a fairly viable and low cost archive method. One advantage it has is that it simply needs an optical imaging device to "retrieve" as opposed to computer hardware of a certain vintage. I filed this in 'ideas to explore further' and hope to get back to it sometime this decade.)
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Ned Ward

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Re: Multitrack archiving
« Reply #25 on: June 19, 2021, 12:05:22 AM »

I prefer the idea of "mixed media" meaning that I want my data on at least two different kinds of media for long term storage. DVD is doable up to a certain size but for multitrack audio backup, Bluray is looking pretty good. Of course, for the longest term storage, transcribing it all to written music on acid free paper, stored in a long term controlled environment is one of the tried and true methods.

Whatever you do, don't give your archives to Universal Studios to store.  https://www.nytimes.com/2019/06/11/magazine/universal-fire-master-recordings.html

(I've heard that saving digital data to full page QR style codes on paper is actually a fairly viable and low cost archive method. One advantage it has is that it simply needs an optical imaging device to "retrieve" as opposed to computer hardware of a certain vintage. I filed this in 'ideas to explore further' and hope to get back to it sometime this decade.)

I can personally attest that DVD is a very temporary storage option - with prosumer burners, the dye fades after a while and you lose all your data... I know from experience from losing 10 DVDs of Pro Tools files, Opcode Studio Vision Pro Files, home movies, etc...
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Mark Oakley

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Re: Multitrack archiving
« Reply #26 on: June 19, 2021, 09:19:46 AM »

I can personally attest that DVD is a very temporary storage option - with prosumer burners, the dye fades after a while and you lose all your data... I know from experience from losing 10 DVDs of Pro Tools files, Opcode Studio Vision Pro Files, home movies, etc...

That's why I'm using "M" disks-apparently they're good for 1000 years: 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/M-DISC#:~:text=M-DISC%20%28Millennial%20Disc%29%20is%20a%20write-once%20optical%20disc,Inc.%20and%20available%20as%20DVD%20and%20Blu-ray%20discs.

-Mark
« Last Edit: June 19, 2021, 09:26:14 AM by Mark Oakley »
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Dan Richardson

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Re: Multitrack archiving
« Reply #27 on: June 19, 2021, 10:15:19 AM »

apparently they're good for 1000 years:

We'll know if they were right in 3009.
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drew gandy

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Re: Multitrack archiving
« Reply #28 on: June 19, 2021, 11:47:57 AM »

I can personally attest that DVD is a very temporary storage option - with prosumer burners, the dye fades after a while and you lose all your data... I know from experience from losing 10 DVDs of Pro Tools files, Opcode Studio Vision Pro Files, home movies, etc...

Were all of your losses from the same batch of discs? Same manufacturer? The same burner? I've heard many anecdotes about this kind of failure but haven't heard many details.

I've pulled some stuff off of 10yr+ old DVD archives and had no issues but I've only attempted a tiny fraction of what I have on DVD. Back in the studio days I tried to save everything on DVD-R as well as DVD+R discs in an attempt to diversify. In the next few years I will hopefully go through and transfer the most important stuff to different media in order to avoid the bit rot. If you consider it a 10 year archive form, and then think about how much tech has (or will) advance in that 10 years, it buys you time to find a better archive method and perhaps cull some of what needs to be saved.

Again, I think of DVD as only one form of media with which to attempt your longer term archive.
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John Hiemburg

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Re: Multitrack archiving
« Reply #29 on: June 19, 2021, 12:49:16 PM »

That's why I'm using "M" disks-apparently they're good for 1000 years: 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/M-DISC#:~:text=M-DISC%20%28Millennial%20Disc%29%20is%20a%20write-once%20optical%20disc,Inc.%20and%20available%20as%20DVD%20and%20Blu-ray%20discs.

-Mark


I don't know... 'millennial disks' - aren't they (according to the news) most likely to go out and spend your data on avocado toast or get offended by something you stored on them?


I kid, I kid.


*dons flame suit just in case*



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ProSoundWeb Community

Re: Multitrack archiving
« Reply #29 on: June 19, 2021, 12:49:16 PM »


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