ProSoundWeb Community

Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
Advanced search  

Pages: 1 [2] 3 4   Go Down

Author Topic: Multitrack archiving  (Read 1705 times)

Mark Oakley

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 189
    • Oakley Audio
Re: Multitrack archiving
« Reply #10 on: June 09, 2021, 04:22:45 PM »

Just did a live Internet broadcast gig on Monday. I generally record all inputs to their own track plus a stereo board mix for quick reference. I usually record a stereo audience pair, but no audience on this one. My recording setup is direct off my iLive from a Waves M2 card to a Dell Alienware 15 R4 Laptop. For live recording I use Waves Tracks Live and mix in Cubase 11.

To archive I'll make two copies: one to an external 8Tb backup drive and one to a Blu-Ray disk. I bought this Blu-Ray burner a year ago and use the 100 Gb M disks: https://www.owcdigital.com/products/mercury-pro-optical

-Mark
« Last Edit: June 09, 2021, 04:53:42 PM by Mark Oakley »
Logged

Erik Jerde

  • Classic LAB
  • Hero Member
  • *
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1135
Re: Multitrack archiving
« Reply #11 on: June 09, 2021, 04:48:20 PM »

Fortunately audio isnít data intensive (compared to video) so you can archive a lot for cheap.  Bit rot a offline device failure is real.  If you care about the data it needs to be on-line and checked for bit rot on a schedule (I check weekly).  If you want to go truly offline then the only time proven medium is tape.  LTO is expensive compared to disk but youíre buying reliability.  You can buy a nas unit and then use a cloud backup service for your second off-site copy.  Some nas devices can backup directly to a cloud provider which is great.

Just remember data in one place - even if that place is your ďbackup driveĒ - isnít backed up.  I backup to multiple devices in multiple physical locations.  Iím not geographically diverse but I donít anticipate caring if that becomes an issue.

There are media archiving software platforms out there.  Iíve looked into them in years past but they were always way to expensive.  They provide database front end that facilitates things like workgroup project sharing and searchable metadata.  Some will even do voice recognition transcripts that are then searchable.
Logged

Tim McCulloch

  • SR Forums
  • Hero Member
  • *
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 22188
  • Wichita, Kansas USA
Re: Multitrack archiving
« Reply #12 on: June 09, 2021, 06:34:14 PM »

Yikes! And thanks, Corey. Words to the wise. I always figured S3 was a gateway drug -- I'd better watch my usage. -F

The $300 credit AWS gives you when you sign up can be pissed away in a few days if you leave a 'machine' running or have to pay for data transfer between to AWS zones because you set up a 'machine' in the wrong zone.
Logged
"Practicing an art, no matter how well or badly, is a way to make your soul grow, for heaven's sake. Sing in the shower. Dance to the radio. Tell stories. Write a poem to a friend, even a lousy poem. Do it as well as you possible can. You will get an enormous reward. You will have created something."  - Kurt Vonnegut

Tim McCulloch

  • SR Forums
  • Hero Member
  • *
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 22188
  • Wichita, Kansas USA
Re: Multitrack archiving
« Reply #13 on: June 09, 2021, 06:44:12 PM »

I give all client recordings to the client, and the safety copy I keep... until the client verifies their original is intact.  After that the thumb drive, HD, SSD, whatever... goes into the pile for erasure and reuse.  The only audio files I keep 'forever' are the recordings I make for myself from purchased sources.

I'll take some bit rot over magnetic tape oxide shedding...
Logged
"Practicing an art, no matter how well or badly, is a way to make your soul grow, for heaven's sake. Sing in the shower. Dance to the radio. Tell stories. Write a poem to a friend, even a lousy poem. Do it as well as you possible can. You will get an enormous reward. You will have created something."  - Kurt Vonnegut

Ned Ward

  • SR Forums
  • Hero Member
  • *
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1452
  • Redondo Beach, CA
    • Our band's page on Facebook
Re: Multitrack archiving
« Reply #14 on: June 09, 2021, 07:14:56 PM »

Backups on rotational drives that are always plugged in. If you have hard disk drives, don't make the mistake of leaving them unplugged - over time, the drive bearings can seize, and then when powering up your drive can be toast.

I use Backblaze for backups - it's a pay one price regardless of how much you have to back up or how many attached drives. Restore can either be over the internet or they'll mail you a drive for $139. Restore your files, return the drive and your payment is returned.

Check it out and if this looks like it works for you, this code gets you a month free - and in return gets me a month free. If you don't want to click on the link, no worries, but it's a great backup system that Pro Tools, Photoshop and Video editors also swear by - I found out about it in 2017 from a Photoshop editor doing all the packaging files for a small toy company...

https://secure.backblaze.com/r/01a5ln
Logged

Russell Ault

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1382
  • Edmonton, AB
Re: Multitrack archiving
« Reply #15 on: June 09, 2021, 08:10:14 PM »

Local storage is most likely going to be less expensive than cloud storage solutions over time.
{...}
Rotational hard drives are by far the most economical for archival storage today.  Realistically, expect 5 years of life out of a drive at max. At that point, you should migrate to new hardware.
{...}

Less expensive, perhaps, but I'd much rather pay someone to worry about that kind of maintenance.

For what it's worth, I use OVH for cloud storage (they're the largest European hosting provider), and their prices (at least in Canada) are quite a bit cheaper than AWS (I can't believe how much S3 charges for data transfers!).

-Russ
Logged

Brian Bolly

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 574
  • Homeward Bound
Re: Multitrack archiving
« Reply #16 on: June 10, 2021, 11:03:09 AM »

Check it out and if this looks like it works for you, this code gets you a month free - and in return gets me a month free. If you don't want to click on the link, no worries, but it's a great backup system that Pro Tools, Photoshop and Video editors also swear by - I found out about it in 2017 from a Photoshop editor doing all the packaging files for a small toy company...

https://secure.backblaze.com/r/01a5ln

This thread is timely.  I just lost a 2yr old SSD in a RAID1 setup this morning.  Took me a bit to figure out why my MBP kept giving me the grey screen of death, and then I discovered my stack o' drives was hot enough to fry an egg on. 

I have a feeling the other drive may be headed south as well, so I'm dumping them to the cloud asap. Thanks for the link!
Logged

Corey Scogin

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1227
  • Birmingham, AL, US
Re: Multitrack archiving
« Reply #17 on: June 10, 2021, 11:54:41 AM »

I use Backblaze for backups - it's a pay one price regardless of how much you have to back up or how many attached drives. Restore can either be over the internet or they'll mail you a drive for $139. Restore your files, return the drive and your payment is returned.

https://secure.backblaze.com/r/01a5ln

Backblaze also has a more generic storage service "B2" which is S3 protocol compatible. It's useful if you don't want to keep everything locally.

I tried several systems a few years back and I found that the personal backup Backblaze service is good but there are some caveats: You don't have granular control over what gets backed up. Restores are only available through a web browser, not through the desktop app so downloading large restores will be as reliable as your web browser and connection. Other systems (like Crashplan) use their desktop apps so it can do multi-connection segmented downloads and more intelligently restart incomplete downloads without manual intervention. This may have changed since I looked at Backblaze years ago.
Logged

Ned Ward

  • SR Forums
  • Hero Member
  • *
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1452
  • Redondo Beach, CA
    • Our band's page on Facebook
Re: Multitrack archiving
« Reply #18 on: June 10, 2021, 01:38:58 PM »

Backblaze also has a more generic storage service "B2" which is S3 protocol compatible. It's useful if you don't want to keep everything locally.

I tried several systems a few years back and I found that the personal backup Backblaze service is good but there are some caveats: You don't have granular control over what gets backed up. Restores are only available through a web browser, not through the desktop app so downloading large restores will be as reliable as your web browser and connection. Other systems (like Crashplan) use their desktop apps so it can do multi-connection segmented downloads and more intelligently restart incomplete downloads without manual intervention. This may have changed since I looked at Backblaze years ago.

Corey - it's still a web-based system for backup, but in terms of preferences, you can specify which drives are backed up, or exclude drives/folders/files if you want. You can also schedule when to back up instead of continuous, as well as choosing faster network vs. faster backups.

For single files or docs, the web system works, but for big Pro Tools sessions or when I had to replace a 4TB drive, I just paid the $139 to get a 4TB with my data on it, transferred it, sent the drive back and got back my $139. I haven't used other systems so I can't compare what's better, but I've been happy with it. May be worth revisiting to see if it works for you.
Logged

Tim Weaver

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 2914
  • College Station, Texas
    • Daniela Weaver Photography
Re: Multitrack archiving
« Reply #19 on: June 11, 2021, 03:32:31 PM »

We (the church where I work) have Google services so I have an unlimited google drive where all the multitracks go. I didnít pick it, but it mostly works. Its annoying that it zips files when you download so it creates a mess out of your tracks, but its pretty easy to clean up.

We store our multitraks in a folder for each sermon. Labeled by date with a dash 1 or dash 2 to denote which service.

So todays date would be 210611-1. Year/month/day-service. Doing it this way, year and mnth first helps keep your folders neat and organized. I start a new folder every year and just dump the folders containing the tracks and session in the year folder.
Logged
Bullwinkle: This is the amplifier, which amplifies the sound. This is the Preamplifier which, of course, amplifies the pree's.

ProSoundWeb Community

Re: Multitrack archiving
¬ę Reply #19 on: June 11, 2021, 03:32:31 PM ¬Ľ


Pages: 1 [2] 3 4   Go Up
 



Site Hosted By Ashdown Technologies, Inc.

Page created in 0.03 seconds with 20 queries.