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LF haystack

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Luke Geis:
I go for flat as well. I prefer the sub-content to sound equal and relative to the mids and highs. I also run subs on an aux.

I do a LOT of board mixes and live recordings where I have to balance the live sound with the recording quality. I prefer taking the board mix hot off the main master. I balance the two worlds by running the PA through a matrix and tuning the PA to match what I hear in my ears. More or less the Dave Rat tuning trick. The prescription is simple. If you have a set of earbuds or headphones you trust, tune the PA to sound like they do. Then what you hear in your ears is nearly the same as what you hear in the room. Doing this I find I can get damn good 2-track board mixes and the room sounds great as well. No complaints so far.

The haystack thing I find is only reserved for music that depends on it ( hip hop, pop et all ) and when realistic recording of the media is not crucial or needed.

Steve-White:
^^^ I do it similar Luke.  Dial it in with the equipment, then the final is tuning is done listening with known program material.

For a club or portable DJ system I tune it up and listen to known well engineered program material of the genre of the system intent.

Once it's dialed in pretty close, crank it up and walk out in front or onto dance floor and close my eyes.  When I can visualize it, it's right.  When I can see the brass shining off of the horns, see the band playing it - done.

When designing system, headroom is the name of the game.  Always have a bit more in the low mids for talk-over with compressors setup for ducking on the DJ mic.  Sounds real clean, clear, articulate and not ear piercing.

Matthias McCready:

--- Quote from: Kent Clasen on April 14, 2021, 10:34:30 AM ---
It would seem with an aux feed sub that if you have ~15dB of hay stack that when pushing the system you would run out of headroom in the subs much quicker.

--- End quote ---

If you are not already aware keep in mind when you haystack the subs, that you are moving the physical crossover of the system and your subs.

For example (obviously this is speaker dependent) if your system DSP crossover is set at  60hz, if you had an 18dB haystack your actual crossover frequency could now be 125hz.

--

Personally I prefer flat as well. Let channel processing do its job  ;)

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As to board mixes it is REALLY nice when you have a fantastic system which is relatively flat, your room is great, and your mix position is in a great place. However as we all know this isn't often the circumstance.

My current house gig has a top brand PA; unfortunately the overall deployment of the rig and the mix position negates a great board mix. For a board mix recording (to examine mix decisions, show execution etc) I usually use a matrix that is getting the same groups as the PA, and I have found for most venues some processing on the record matrix can account for an imperfect system/deployment/room and help things to translate. With recording separated on a Matrix I can mix for the PA/Room and still have a valuable tool for afterwards.

Luke Geis:
Matthias,

    The shift in acoustic crossover points is true, but not true. Once you set the levels, crossovers, and other DSP, you don't mess with the master levels. At unity gain, you are in theory, utilizing the system as it was set up to run. The acoustic crossover point will not change provided you don't change the master send levels.

Now where things differ is the relative send levels of each channel. If you send the kick drum at a very high level to the subs, its acoustic crossover point may be shifted in relation to the mains, but that is kind of the whole idea. However, as with anything, too much of a good thing is still too much. If you send the level to the sub aux too high, you may end up with a very weak and anemic sounding board mix because you allocated the energy too much towards the subs.

The name of the game is balance. I DO NOT like too much low-end; so I strive hard to keep it curtailed and under wraps. This is probably why I like systems that have very little or no haystack subs responses? I also never cared for the idea of boosting a bunch of 50-80hz on the kick drum. To me, it sounds unnatural. This is how you end up with live recordings where the kick drum is just a big fluffy pooooof and walks all over everything. With subs on an aux, you can tune things to sound right in your ears and in the main PA, and then add them to the subs as needed/desired. The subs simply become a way to fill out the rest of the sonic spectrum. If you gain a channel up past unity gain on a send, does the acoustic crossover point change? I purpose NO it doesn't, because the DSP and the rest of the system doesn't know if that sound was supposed to be that way or not. I.E. If the channel needed to be turned up that much to get the desired sound, it was devoid of that media to begin with and if it sounds right when gained up as such, then it is right, and you haven't broken the rules of PA systems design and deployment doing it :)

So once again, it is about balance. The trick I was taught many years ago as it relates to subs on an aux was to tune the channel with its aux send off. Once the channel sounded right in the mains, then you added the subs in to taste. This is where the headphone/earbuds trick really works well if you are doing live recordings. Your headphones give you a full-range response indicative of a full-range speaker system. If it sounds good in your ears, then it should also sound good out of your PA. If that is true, then from the PA with no subs it will sound weak and thin. So as you add in the subs from the channels aux send, it should fill out and sound wonderful again.

There is no rule that says you can't send every channel to the subs either, although objectively the idea is to not. Utilizing subs on an aux can free up LOTS of headroom for live band situations. I have found that with some tricks, you can free up as much as 9db, which may be just enough to take you from not nearly enough to just enough.

Matthias McCready:

--- Quote from: Luke Geis on April 18, 2021, 01:37:03 PM ---Matthias,

    The shift in acoustic crossover points is true, but not true. Once you set the levels, crossovers, and other DSP, you don't mess with the master levels. At unity gain, you are in theory, utilizing the system as it was set up to run. The acoustic crossover point will not change provided you don't change the master send levels.



--- End quote ---

Yes, this is what I had meant.

I have seen guys set the crossover (tune/tone the PA), and then do their giant haystack. Obviously if the haystack is accounted for when setting the crossover things will be fine.


--- Quote from: Luke Geis on April 18, 2021, 01:37:03 PM ---The trick I was taught many years ago as it relates to subs on an aux was to tune the channel with its aux send off. Once the channel sounded right in the mains, then you added the subs in to taste.


--- End quote ---

This is also how I run things (when Subs are on Aux, which is most of the time for me).

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