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Author Topic: coiling feeder cable  (Read 1681 times)

Ed Hall

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Re: coiling feeder cable
« Reply #10 on: April 02, 2021, 08:21:18 am »

Just common sense-if you think about the physics behind the rules in the NEC.  Just like thinking about the physics involved in setting up a sound system.

This was so much easier before physics got involved!  ;D
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doug johnson2

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Re: coiling feeder cable
« Reply #11 on: April 03, 2021, 06:27:42 pm »

Dave Rat has some thoughts on the subject:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jgq8-4m133o
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Stephen Swaffer

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Re: coiling feeder cable
« Reply #12 on: April 05, 2021, 12:36:33 pm »

Speaker cable and feeder cable are not the same thing and usually have different considerations.
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Steve Swaffer

Dave Garoutte

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Re: coiling feeder cable
« Reply #13 on: April 05, 2021, 04:06:06 pm »

Speaker cable and feeder cable are not the same thing and usually have different considerations.
He did mention that power cables also have inductive issues, just not the same ones.
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Brian Jojade

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Re: coiling feeder cable
« Reply #14 on: April 05, 2021, 05:08:26 pm »

Induction heating?
If all the current is returning in the same cable, it's resistance heating.

While I agree, most of the heating issues of coiled cable has to do with resistance heating and dissipation.  However, I have experienced a couple of times where it appeared something else is at play.  I've done an event several times over the years where the setup involves a bit of excess feeder cable that ends up coiled under a stage.  Wrapped in a normal loop fashion and tucked away 6/4 cable, less than 30 amp load, which was never a problem. .  Never got even warm to the touch.

One show, during our setup, we smelled something hot and found the coil of wire so hot it couldn't be touched.  The we did note that someone set a coffee can full of nuts and bolts inside the coil.

Now, it's possible that the exact wrap of the wire happened to be slightly different, or slightly neater, but since I'm the one that put the coil there each time, it's hard to believe that it was THAT different that particular year to cause such a difference.

Removed the coffee can and bolts and spilled the wire around a bit, and all was well.  Definitely a very strange scenario.
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Brian Jojade

Chris Hindle

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Re: coiling feeder cable
« Reply #15 on: April 05, 2021, 05:33:13 pm »

While I agree, most of the heating issues of coiled cable has to do with resistance heating and dissipation.  However, I have experienced a couple of times where it appeared something else is at play.  I've done an event several times over the years where the setup involves a bit of excess feeder cable that ends up coiled under a stage.  Wrapped in a normal loop fashion and tucked away 6/4 cable, less than 30 amp load, which was never a problem. .  Never got even warm to the touch.

One show, during our setup, we smelled something hot and found the coil of wire so hot it couldn't be touched.  The we did note that someone set a coffee can full of nuts and bolts inside the coil.

Now, it's possible that the exact wrap of the wire happened to be slightly different, or slightly neater, but since I'm the one that put the coil there each time, it's hard to believe that it was THAT different that particular year to cause such a difference.

Removed the coffee can and bolts and spilled the wire around a bit, and all was well.  Definitely a very strange scenario.
You made a big ass iron core coil......
Chris.
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Geoff Doane

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Re: coiling feeder cable
« Reply #16 on: April 05, 2021, 08:50:59 pm »

You made a big ass iron core coil......


Yeah, but with 6/4 shouldn't the current, and therefore the magnetic field around the cable, cancel out to zero?

I'm not saying the cable didn't get hot (obviously, it did), but I'm not sure that "induction" is what is going on here.

GTD
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Chris Hindle

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Re: coiling feeder cable
« Reply #17 on: April 06, 2021, 08:07:11 am »

Yeah, but with 6/4 shouldn't the current, and therefore the magnetic field around the cable, cancel out to zero?

I'm not saying the cable didn't get hot (obviously, it did), but I'm not sure that "induction" is what is going on here.

GTD

i can't think of any other way to explain why the loop of feeder got so hot, when he has done it many times without the "core", and had no problems. I guess one of our many experts has to chime in... Where's Mike Sokol. I bet he has an easy answer for us.
Chris.
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Brian Jojade

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Re: coiling feeder cable
« Reply #18 on: April 06, 2021, 10:49:31 am »

You made a big ass iron core coil......
Chris.

That was my thought, however, the current going both directions in the wire should have cancelled things out.  I don't have a logical explanation as to why this happened.
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Brian Jojade

Art Welter

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Re: coiling feeder cable
« Reply #19 on: April 06, 2021, 04:26:49 pm »

Yeah, but with 6/4 shouldn't the current, and therefore the magnetic field around the cable, cancel out to zero?
The ferromagnetic core made by the can of iron nuts and bolts inside the coil could increase the magnetic field and inductance of the AC wire coil by hundreds of times over what it would be without the core.  Like a stalled induction motor, the coils heat up due to increased currents in the armature.

There probably was also plenty of 60Hz hum in the mess before the can of iron nuts and bolts was removed...



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ProSoundWeb Community

Re: coiling feeder cable
« Reply #19 on: April 06, 2021, 04:26:49 pm »


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