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Author Topic: Is there a better way.  (Read 3713 times)

richard_cooper

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Re: Is there a better way.
« Reply #10 on: March 16, 2021, 05:51:15 PM »

I have to make some panels coming up soon.  When connecting the connectors to the panel, Iíve always used a screwdriver in one hand, and a pair of needle nose pliers in the other hand.  Was never able to get a socket around it.  Anyone else ever have a better way than needle nose pliers?

I don't do much of this, so understand this is an added expense and may have downsides I'm not aware of.... I've used Neutrik MFDs and M3 screws quite a bit with no failures.
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James Cotton

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Re: Is there a better way.
« Reply #11 on: March 16, 2021, 05:54:27 PM »

These are long, but there are shorter ones.  If the OD is too big, they can be ground down.  Magnetic.

Looks like that one would need grinding down to have a chance. I like that it's magnetic.
Here's the one I have, the socket part is quite deep which is good. It works some of the time depending on connector type but still binds way too often.

https://uk.rs-online.com/web/p/nut-drivers/4601691/

Since I bought the little spanner it's all I've used.
Speaking of which....

https://uk.rs-online.com/web/p/spanners/6140520/

Then you use the correct color/size flat head (countersunk) bolt and it works great.

Good if you're having panels manufactured (a lot of mine were and I did go that route on some but the countersinking was quite expensive for what it was) but no good for off-the-shelf pre-punched Penn panels and the like.

Screws installed properly look a little nicer.

I use black rivets on black panels so you can hardly see them.
That's another reason I don't like countersunk screws, the CNC metal shops I've worked with use pre-anodised metal or I ship them Penn blank rack panels which again are already coated. The countersink reveals the underlying aluminium and with black screws you get a little silver ring visible.
I just like the rear mounted connectors with almost invisible fastners look.
Front mount your connectors and this discussion is completely irrelevant  :)

If installed properly with locktite are just as durable as rivets.

Nylocks all the way! No messy locktite to deal with on stuff that's already fiddly and although not reuseable if safety is a concern they still lock fine second time around for connector mounting applications.
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Dave Garoutte

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Re: Is there a better way.
« Reply #12 on: March 16, 2021, 09:19:52 PM »

I just thought about that you could grind one side of the socket nearly away for clearance and turn the screw instead.
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Steve-White

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Re: Is there a better way.
« Reply #13 on: March 16, 2021, 11:46:35 PM »

One way I've done panels is to use use tek screws and pilot drill the holes first.  Drive them in with a cordless impact driver - quit using cordless drill with adjustable clutch, not the same.  The cordless impact gun regulates applied torque via the speed control on the trigger so the screws can be consistently be pulled down properly.

Have pulled a lot of pop rivets as well and about two years ago on a project using stainless steel rivets I picked up a pneumatic rivet gun.  The next rack panel I assemble will be with pop rivets.  They are well suited for that use as panels require little to no maintenance and really no field maintenance.

Pop rivets work and work very well.  Can they be installed incorrectly?  I would imagine so.  Pop rivets are used extensively in case manufacture, chassis manufacture, etc.
« Last Edit: March 16, 2021, 11:49:15 PM by Steve-White »
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Keith Broughton

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Re: Is there a better way.
« Reply #14 on: March 17, 2021, 08:05:13 AM »

I use a Whia nut driver and a magnetic screw driver (leave the blade on a speaker magnet for a while)
https://www.wihatools.ca/screwdrivers/nut-drivers/picofinish-precision-inch-nut-drivers
I have found that rivets, in some cases, will loosen up after heavy use.
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Rick Earl

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Re: Is there a better way.
« Reply #15 on: March 17, 2021, 10:33:47 AM »

I have to make some panels coming up soon.  When connecting the connectors to the panel, Iíve always used a screwdriver in one hand, and a pair of needle nose pliers in the other hand.  Was never able to get a socket around it.  Anyone else ever have a better way than needle nose pliers?

I use these with no problems: https://www.wihatools.com/catalog/product/view/id/6368/s/picofinish-precision-inch-nut-driver-8pc-set-in-canvas-pouch/category/379/
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Brian Jojade

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Re: Is there a better way.
« Reply #16 on: March 18, 2021, 02:35:42 PM »


That's another reason I don't like countersunk screws, the CNC metal shops I've worked with use pre-anodised metal or I ship them Penn blank rack panels which again are already coated. The countersink reveals the underlying aluminium and with black screws you get a little silver ring visible.

A sharpie fixes that right quick.
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Brian Jojade

James Cotton

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Re: Is there a better way.
« Reply #17 on: March 18, 2021, 08:00:20 PM »

A sharpie fixes that right quick.

LOL you're right there, I think I ended up doing that.
Those panels were made in the days when Sharpies didn't exist in the UK but I still had some, I'd buy 4 or 5 boxes from WalMart every time I'd holiday in Florida. You can get 'em in the local supermarkets now.
I think my switch to rivets was made when I did a panel with over 120 XLRs and the cost of countersinking was significant.
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Brian Adams

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Re: Is there a better way.
« Reply #18 on: March 18, 2021, 08:29:23 PM »

I also hate rivets on connectors. The can loosen over time, and they make it much more difficult to replace the connector, especially if they spin when you drill them out.

I typically use #4 screws. Flat head if the connector is on the outside of the panel, pan head if the connector is behind. Most nut drivers will fit in the space between the nut and the connector shell.

I prefer Keps nuts. They don't rattle loose, and you usually don't even have to secure them while you're tightening them. If I don't have room to get my fingers in there, I use a magnetic #2 phillips to hold the center of the nut while I thread the screw in. Once I start tightening, the lock washer attached to the nut holds it in place well enough to tightening the screw. A nut driver works fine too, but a magnetic screwdriver is easier for me.

Keps nuts. They're awesome. Much better than nylocks in basically every way.
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Frank Koenig

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Re: Is there a better way.
« Reply #19 on: March 18, 2021, 10:32:41 PM »

I prefer Keps nuts. They don't rattle loose, and you usually don't even have to secure them while you're tightening them.

This. My application is likely not as demanding as you guys', but I've never had a Kep nut rattle loose and, as Brian points out, you don't need to hold the nut. --Frank
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Re: Is there a better way.
¬ę Reply #19 on: March 18, 2021, 10:32:41 PM ¬Ľ


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