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Transient response?

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duane massey:
Just an idle question from a self-educated man: I understand how to read specs on speaker cabinets, and have been building cabinets for almost 50 years, so I should know the answer to this: is there any posted measurements in regards to the accuracy or transient response of a cabinet? Any way to compare boominess (maybe not the right term) at higher volume levels? We used to call it the "what goes in, comes out the same" goal, but we only had our ears back then, no test equipment.

Art Welter:

--- Quote from: duane massey on February 21, 2021, 01:31:43 pm ---Just an idle question from a self-educated man: I understand how to read specs on speaker cabinets, and have been building cabinets for almost 50 years, so I should know the answer to this: is there any posted measurements in regards to the accuracy or transient response of a cabinet? Any way to compare boominess (maybe not the right term) at higher volume levels? We used to call it the "what goes in, comes out the same" goal, but we only had our ears back then, no test equipment.

--- End quote ---
Spec sheet measurements don't directly indicate "Transient Response", though a smooth phase response and extended flat frequency response are good indicators. The ability to reproduce a recognizable square wave over a wide bandwidth is also a good indicator.

"Boominess", or "ringing", can be seen in waterfall or spectrograph measurements, showing energy storage vs time:

https://data-bass.com/#/articles/5cc0bc36a75a260004255c88?_k=25yqrk

Energy storage reduces, or "smears" transient impact.

Art

Martin Morris:

--- Quote from: duane massey on February 21, 2021, 01:31:43 pm ---Just an idle question from a self-educated man: I understand how to read specs on speaker cabinets, and have been building cabinets for almost 50 years, so I should know the answer to this: is there any posted measurements in regards to the accuracy or transient response of a cabinet? Any way to compare boominess (maybe not the right term) at higher volume levels? We used to call it the "what goes in, comes out the same" goal, but we only had our ears back then, no test equipment.

--- End quote ---

Duane,

Arta software has the Waterfall feature ... cheap too ... FREE

https://www.artalabs.hr/index.htm

cheers
Martin

John Roberts {JR}:

--- Quote from: duane massey on February 21, 2021, 01:31:43 pm ---Just an idle question from a self-educated man: I understand how to read specs on speaker cabinets, and have been building cabinets for almost 50 years, so I should know the answer to this: is there any posted measurements in regards to the accuracy or transient response of a cabinet? Any way to compare boominess (maybe not the right term) at higher volume levels? We used to call it the "what goes in, comes out the same" goal, but we only had our ears back then, no test equipment.

--- End quote ---
Since this is subwoofer forum I will ASSume limited frequency response.

Transient response can be objectively quantified by rise time, not sure how much it matters after the LPF of a sub.

JR

Ivan Beaver:

--- Quote from: John Roberts {JR} on February 21, 2021, 11:18:14 pm ---Since this is subwoofer forum I will ASSume limited frequency response.

Transient response can be objectively quantified by rise time, not sure how much it matters after the LPF of a sub.

JR

--- End quote ---
Yeah.  It is like drawing a line on the road.  The question is "when do you cross it"?  If you are walking that is pretty easy, but what if you in a tractor trailer?  Do you "cross it", then front touches the line?  but a little later you are still on the line, or when the rear of the trailer crosses it?  Or in the middle?

Higher freq are easier, but low freq present a whole new set of questions.

Even something like "arrival" of a low freq signal. Is it when the first part of the signal gets to you? or the peak?  Since low freq wavelengths can be very long, it gets into a whole different discussion.

Just look at the auto delay finders on various measurement platforms.  "If" they can give you a repeatable number, it is much longer than the distance you are away from the loudspeaker.  That is because they are adding the distance from the source AND the distance to the center part of the wavelength together.

Higher freq are much easier, because the wavelengths are much shorter.

And then you have the latency of the LP filter to add to the whole mess-------------

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