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Early Marshall Line Sources

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Chris Hindle:

--- Quote from: lindsay Dean on November 25, 2020, 01:48:32 PM ---Nostalgic to see the words "long throw" on the Marshall advertising pamphlet

--- End quote ---
I dunno Lindsay....
(not talking arena's or stadiums)
"Point that 4x12 at me, don't be surprised if there's nothing on the board tapes" comes to mind.... ::)
Chris

Mike Caldwell:
I could see where some creative stacking configurations could make 40 some odd 4X12 pa cabinets per side less bad.

Art Welter:

--- Quote from: Ivan Beaver on November 17, 2020, 04:56:37 PM ---
The later Marshall PAs included dual 15" bins (look kinda like scoops, but have grills, so hard to say), radial horns etc, 250 watt amplifiers and 12 channel mixers.  That must have been the stuff Deep Purple was using when the set the worlds record for loudest band.  110dB, with a 10,000 watt Marshall PA.  NO, the Guiness book of world records didn't state the weighting or the distance with that spec.  That was around '76 or so?????

--- End quote ---
Summer of 1975,  I put together an all-horn system (8 bass drivers, 12 high drivers) for an outdoor show for the Minneapolis band "Rockinghorse". I would estimate that system could hit over 110 dBC at 16 meters.

Although it was the loudest system I'd ever heard up to then, it was by no means a "record breaker" for the time, so "for the record":

The Guinness "loudest band" category started in 1972, when it recorded Deep Purple at the London Rainbow Theatre at 117 dB.
The Who’s 1976 record was 126 dB at a distance of 32 meters outdoors.
That stood until 1984, when in Hanover, Germany, Manowar hit 129.5 decibels.
Guinness no longer includes a category of "loudest band" ;^).

Art
 


Scott Holtzman:

--- Quote from: Art Welter on November 26, 2020, 05:19:27 PM ---Summer of 1975,  I put together an all-horn system (8 bass drivers, 12 high drivers) for an outdoor show for the Minneapolis band "Rockinghorse". I would estimate that system could hit over 110 dBC at 16 meters.

Although it was the loudest system I'd ever heard up to then, it was by no means a "record breaker" for the time, so "for the record":

The Guinness "loudest band" category started in 1972, when it recorded Deep Purple at the London Rainbow Theatre at 117 dB.
The Who’s 1976 record was 126 dB at a distance of 32 meters outdoors.
That stood until 1984, when in Hanover, Germany, Manowar hit 129.5 decibels.
Guinness no longer includes a category of "loudest band" ;^).

Art

--- End quote ---


ManoWar's audio engineer Jeff Hair is a Cleveland audio legend.  Really nice guy too.


https://www.facebook.com/watch/?v=10155221681288517

https://www.camco-audio.com/news2.html





Daniel Levi:

--- Quote from: Scott Holtzman on November 27, 2020, 01:16:38 AM ---
ManoWar's audio engineer Jeff Hair is a Cleveland audio legend.  Really nice guy too.


https://www.facebook.com/watch/?v=10155221681288517

https://www.camco-audio.com/news2.html

--- End quote ---

I would assume pretty deaf by this point unless he had hearing protection, must have been deafening concerts.

I suppose back in the day given that PA's were not as directional as they can be now, without delay stacks, you needed a lot more volume out front to get a decent level at the back.

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