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Cat6a shielding connected via wall plates

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Rob Spence:

--- Quote from: Chrysander 'C.R.' Young on September 22, 2020, 08:45:09 AM ---Why Cat6a?  That stuff is heavier, thicker, more expensive, and harder to work with than other options and is way overkill for your needs.  For M32/X32, Cat5e with Ethercon is the right answer.

--- End quote ---

Well, for installs where the wires may be in place for decades, it makes sense to use a more current cable. After all, the M32 et al may not be the console in use even just a few years from now.

My $0.02

John L Nobile:

--- Quote from: Rob Spence on September 22, 2020, 10:01:54 AM ---Well, for installs where the wires may be in place for decades, it makes sense to use a more current cable. After all, the M32 et al may not be the console in use even just a few years from now.

My $0.02

--- End quote ---

We're now up to Cat 8 cable and it's supposedly backward compatible. Looks like it's meant to compete with short fiber runs.

https://www.cablesandkits.com/learning-center/what-are-cat8-ethernet-cables

Brian Jojade:

--- Quote from: John L Nobile on September 22, 2020, 10:46:47 AM ---We're now up to Cat 8 cable and it's supposedly backward compatible. Looks like it's meant to compete with short fiber runs.

https://www.cablesandkits.com/learning-center/what-are-cat8-ethernet-cables

--- End quote ---

Cat 8 has a max cable length of 30 meters (about 100 feet). Great for server rooms and such, but not as a full installation technology.

Cat 6 is rated for 10 gigabit speeds for up to about 150 feet of cable, whereas cat6a is rated to do 10 gig for the full 100 meters.

In the overall scheme of things, cat 6 cable should be adequate for most things for the next decade or so.  However, we are starting to see more and more devices that support 10 gig ethernet.  If the cost allows installing cat 6a wiring, you can enjoy a few more years out of the installation before it will need replacement.  Replacing working cable to get something a little faster down the road is a much harder item to get into the budget.

Now, on an interesting note, I was working on a piece of equipment in a doctors office yesterday.  I came across a warning in the instructions that was interesting to me.  It specifically, and in BOLD letters said Do NOT use shielded cat cable for connecting the device, as that would present a risk of electrical shock to the patient.  Very weird to see that in the instructions.  I'm wondering what scenario could cause that to happen.

Russell Ault:

--- Quote from: Brian Jojade on September 22, 2020, 12:26:52 PM ---[...]
Now, on an interesting note, I was working on a piece of equipment in a doctors office yesterday.  I came across a warning in the instructions that was interesting to me.  It specifically, and in BOLD letters said Do NOT use shielded cat cable for connecting the device, as that would present a risk of electrical shock to the patient.  Very weird to see that in the instructions.  I'm wondering what scenario could cause that to happen.

--- End quote ---

Defibrillation?

-Russ

Erik Jerde:

--- Quote from: Brian Jojade on September 22, 2020, 12:26:52 PM ---Cat 8 has a max cable length of 30 meters (about 100 feet). Great for server rooms and such, but not as a full installation technology.

Cat 6 is rated for 10 gigabit speeds for up to about 150 feet of cable, whereas cat6a is rated to do 10 gig for the full 100 meters.

In the overall scheme of things, cat 6 cable should be adequate for most things for the next decade or so.  However, we are starting to see more and more devices that support 10 gig ethernet.  If the cost allows installing cat 6a wiring, you can enjoy a few more years out of the installation before it will need replacement.  Replacing working cable to get something a little faster down the road is a much harder item to get into the budget.

Now, on an interesting note, I was working on a piece of equipment in a doctors office yesterday.  I came across a warning in the instructions that was interesting to me.  It specifically, and in BOLD letters said Do NOT use shielded cat cable for connecting the device, as that would present a risk of electrical shock to the patient.  Very weird to see that in the instructions.  I'm wondering what scenario could cause that to happen.

--- End quote ---

In the AV world the big reason for higher spec cable is video transmission.  HDBT solutions from reputable mfgrs will have transmission distance listed by resolution on specific cable types. 

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