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Author Topic: JBL SRX828SP, Danley DBH 218, Yorkville LS808, and QSC KW181: An Audience's Take  (Read 2766 times)

Caleb Dueck

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We purchased 16 of the Captivator 218Pro boxes last winter (pre-pandemic). We actually took delivery of the final four after the shelter in place imposed by the California governor, so sadly, no real world reviews of the package yet, although we did get to squeeze a couple of smaller gigs in with them before the lockdown. Prior to the Cap218P, we were using QRX218 subs. We do all sorts of stuff and frankly, with enough quantity, the QRX is a solid box. The Cap218P is physically larger, handles more power, and is more efficient in the lowest registers, by a lot. The driver has more than twice the xmax, and almost three times the power handling, so higher output than the QRX is a given. I measured them both outdoors with a calibrated interface and calibrated microphone. The only processing was a 21hz, LR 24db hi-pass and a 100hz, 36db butterworth low-pass. Measurement source was the same and conditions were identical for each. Microphone on the ground at 1m, no boundaries within 30' and we moved the subs that weren't under test completely out of the area. I'm sure there were things we could have done to get more accurate results, it was on an asphalt parking lot. Maybe that matters, maybe it doesn't. Anyhow, the results are below. Black is Cap218 Pro, Orange is QRX218s. The QRX trace is pretty close to its published spec, so it's probably fair to say that the measurements are reasonably accurate. However accurate they may or may not be, it's certainly an accurate like for like comparison. As you can see, the Cap218P is very solid below 30hz. Bear in mind, our Cap218P is a modified version, the box dimensions differ from the production version. We had them customized to fit into our 16' box truck, so 30"x22.5"x45", and no tilt back wheels. Jeff says the internal box volume is close enough to the stock design that the specs shouldn't really stray. I'm sure he's right, I just thought it would be prudent to mention.

Impressive.  I've read a few posts about the Cap218 over the past few months, looks like a great sub.

What I'd like to see compared at full SPL are a Cap218 Pro and Bassboss ZV28.  If you're up for it Bob, Bassboss is now in California. 
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boburtz

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Impressive.  I've read a few posts about the Cap218 over the past few months, looks like a great sub.

What I'd like to see compared at full SPL are a Cap218 Pro and Bassboss ZV28.  If you're up for it Bob, Bassboss is now in California.
I expect the ZV28 would be louder down low, but it's a significantly larger cabinet. The specs on that thing are impressive. The Cap218P is more on par with BassBoss's SSP218 in terms of physical size. I think the Cap has the advantage below 30hz. Here is the SSP218 published spec, and here also is a measurement of the Cap218P with processing that I've developed in Lake.
If the pandemic drags on for many more months, maybe I'll look into passing the time by making the drive to LA and meeting up with Dave for a sub comparison. I've always been intrigued by the BassBoss stuff, but I think it's safe to say we won't be looking at changing our subs any time soon...
« Last Edit: October 18, 2020, 04:09:56 pm by boburtz »
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Mark Wilkinson

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We purchased 16 of the Captivator 218Pro boxes last winter (pre-pandemic). We actually took delivery of the final four after the shelter in place imposed by the California governor, so sadly, no real world reviews of the package yet, although we did get to squeeze a couple of smaller gigs in with them before the lockdown. Prior to the Cap218P, we were using QRX218 subs. We do all sorts of stuff and frankly, with enough quantity, the QRX is a solid box. The Cap218P is physically larger, handles more power, and is more efficient in the lowest registers, by a lot. The driver has more than twice the xmax, and almost three times the power handling, so higher output than the QRX is a given. I measured them both outdoors with a calibrated interface and calibrated microphone. The only processing was a 21hz, LR 24db hi-pass and a 100hz, 36db butterworth low-pass. Measurement source was the same and conditions were identical for each. Microphone on the ground at 1m, no boundaries within 30' and we moved the subs that weren't under test completely out of the area. I'm sure there were things we could have done to get more accurate results, it was on an asphalt parking lot. Maybe that matters, maybe it doesn't. Anyhow, the results are below. Black is Cap218 Pro, Orange is QRX218s. The QRX trace is pretty close to its published spec, so it's probably fair to say that the measurements are reasonably accurate. However accurate they may or may not be, it's certainly an accurate like for like comparison. As you can see, the Cap218P is very solid below 30hz. Bear in mind, our Cap218P is a modified version, the box dimensions differ from the production version. We had them customized to fit into our 16' box truck, so 30"x22.5"x45", and no tilt back wheels. Jeff says the internal box volume is close enough to the stock design that the specs shouldn't really stray. I'm sure he's right, I just thought it would be prudent to mention.

Thanks from all of us for that Bob, this post and the subsequent processed one.

Cap218 Pro looks like another JTR winner.  Really cool you got 16 of them, and customized to fit. 
That's another thing i like about bass-reflex, how you can  vary WxHxD dimensions and get near identical responses, as long as you keep internal volume and port size the same.
I figure the 21 Hz, LR24 high pass, knocks down response at 30Hz by nearly 2dB on it's own, which makes 30Hz response even a little more impressive.

Your processed graph looks great.  I like to flatten everything within the passband too, and then measure the entire passband's sensitivity.
i think it's the true measure of a sub, as long as no boost's are used beyond 2-3 dB .
Which from the look of your graph, it appears to be all about cuts to get the flattening. 
Was any low-end boost used at all to keep the 30Hz knee?  I figure maybe a little, but you already had 2 free dB just to compensate for the high-pass rolloff.

It's always amazing to me how hard it is to scratch out the last few, clean and safe dB, from the very bottom....and how much it can help the sound at certain select times....

After you get some time with them running harder, will you let us know how much they walk when driven?
Although with 16 subs, you may never be pushing them hard enough to walk i guess.

That's an additional spec I'd love to see for all subs....."walk rate when running near max" haha
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boburtz

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I figure the 21 Hz, LR24 high pass, knocks down response at 30Hz by nearly 2dB on it's own, which makes 30Hz response even a little more impressive.
...
Was any low-end boost used at all to keep the 30Hz knee?
My mistake, it's actually a Butterworth 24db hpf @ 21hz, so not much affect on the 27hz box tuning frequency. Maybe 1db, but I think that's about it. I never measured the box without that protective hpf, maybe I'll look into making that happen if I can find some time in my busy production schedule.  ;)

I used three very narrow, very slight boosts to keep everything flat.
+.8db @ 30.2hz, .12 oct bw
+.8db @ 33.6hz, .33 oct bw
+.5db @ 44.0hz, .33 oct bw
After that it's a few cuts, including a shelf at 67.6hz, 1.51 bw slope @ -4db

I like the looks of the results, it would be nice to be able to open them all up at a show outdoors...



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Mark Wilkinson

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My mistake, it's actually a Butterworth 24db hpf @ 21hz, so not much affect on the 27hz box tuning frequency. Maybe 1db, but I think that's about it. I never measured the box without that protective hpf, maybe I'll look into making that happen if I can find some time in my busy production schedule.  ;)

I used three very narrow, very slight boosts to keep everything flat.
+.8db @ 30.2hz, .12 oct bw
+.8db @ 33.6hz, .33 oct bw
+.5db @ 44.0hz, .33 oct bw
After that it's a few cuts, including a shelf at 67.6hz, 1.51 bw slope @ -4db

I like the looks of the results, it would be nice to be able to open them all up at a show outdoors...

Thx.  Excellent results from such small boosts....methinks you have real world bottom end !!
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