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Can SPL in speakers be controlled??

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Mike Henderson:
Hey guys, I had addressed this issue before but now there is a different twist on it so I am posting a new thread for it.

I am dealing with two local speaker install and setup guys here with two different opinions.

With my dual 18" Sonic bass reflex speaker, some tunes I can feel the bass at around 20' away from it but most tunes I will get that same effect like inside of 7'. So I asked both guys if it would be possible in any way to get every tune's bass at 20'

One guy is telling me I might be able to get the 20' if the "frequency" is set right. The other is saying nothing can be done as every tune is made with it's own SPL so who is correct please? I don't have the scientific technical knowledge of speakers which is why I am asking here.



Paul G. OBrien:
Is that in the same venue with the equipment setup in the same place or across multiple different places? For low frequencies in particular the room has a hugh effect on where and how loud the bass is. And how much bass or kick drum a recording has is going to vary a lot too, some have it in spades and some not so much. IMO it's not your job to fix poor recordings but that is just my opinion.

Luke Geis:
In theory a multi-band dynamics device could do what you have in mind to a degree. If every song being input could have its own setting it would be more consistent, and lord knows how the room is affecting things?

Can SPL in speakers be controlled? The short answer is yes, the long answer is that a lot of work and processing is required to do what you have in mind though and that yes requires a fair amount of work. You are basically talking about having a threshold that you want to target and need the audio expanded up or compressed down to that threshold on a frequency range basis. This is a task that is not easily done with a set and forget devise and a random series of media. If you had a set playlist that you could doctor and tune the media for an optimal ( for your needs ) setting, then apply the expansion and compression afterwards to lock it in, I could see this being more viable.

If you have a 1950's era song that hasn't been heavilly modernized ( mastered to modern standards ) and then you have a modern song, the disparity in dynamic and sonic range between them will be very hard to even out with a basic and static set of tools. If you are playing nothing but stuff made in the past decade, you may have an easier time doing that. Even songs cut in the 1980's are far enough from today that the task will be hard.

 

Mike Henderson:

--- Quote from: Luke Geis on August 23, 2020, 07:13:46 PM ---Can SPL in speakers be controlled? The short answer is yes, the long answer is that a lot of work and processing is required to do what you have in mind though and that yes requires a fair amount of work. You are basically talking about having a threshold that you want to target and need the audio expanded up or compressed down to that threshold on a frequency range basis.

--- End quote ---

Yes you've nailed it. I get the part about the room acoustics . This is not my query but I understand it's role in this.

I think what's always be knowing at me is that the guy said he is able to get constant bass distance and power because of his Digital processor's settings but he had also said it was due to the speaker cab type he has and then too his application is having his speakers in his yard.

Chris Grimshaw:
SPL can be "controlled". Want it louder? Put more power in there. Speakers melted? Get more/better/both speakers.

Want it louder at some frequencies but not others? Use EQ to put more power in at those frequencies, but not the others.


Generally, I've found that more LF extension (ie, a lower -3dB or -10dB point) directly translates as more low-frequency "feel", but as you go deeper into the bass, you need more swept volume (literally, the volume of air being moved) to keep the SPL up.

Chris

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