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Author Topic: Behringer NX6000  (Read 2707 times)

Chris Grimshaw

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Re: Behringer NX6000
« Reply #10 on: May 21, 2020, 04:49:47 am »

Here's the bench test: https://forum.speakerplans.com/behringer-inuke-nu6000-vs-kam-kxd7200-bench-tested_topic69202.html

Photobucket has eaten the pictures, but the write-up is useful.

Quote
To summarise, for music signals, both channels driven, you can expect an output of:

Behringer:
1.37kW into 8 Ohms, 2.05kW into 4 Ohms for full-range or mid-top duty
1.16kW into 8 Ohms, 1.80kW into 4 Ohms for Bass duty

FWIW, your piezo test doesn't load the amplifiers. If there's any PSU (or mains) sag (hint: there always is), then the amp could well end up clipping even if you've set your limiters.

A further FWIW: basic peak limiters don't save drivers - all they do is chop the top of the waveform off, but in a more controlled way than a clipping amp might.
If you want driver protection, RMS limiters are the way to do it.

Chris
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Jack Hawkins

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Re: Behringer NX6000
« Reply #11 on: May 21, 2020, 08:26:06 am »

Here's the bench test: https://forum.speakerplans.com/behringer-inuke-nu6000-vs-kam-kxd7200-bench-tested_topic69202.html

Photobucket has eaten the pictures, but the write-up is useful.

FWIW, your piezo test doesn't load the amplifiers. If there's any PSU (or mains) sag (hint: there always is), then the amp could well end up clipping even if you've set your limiters.

A further FWIW: basic peak limiters don't save drivers - all they do is chop the top of the waveform off, but in a more controlled way than a clipping amp might.
If you want driver protection, RMS limiters are the way to do it.

Chris

I didn't say I was connecting the piezo to the amplifiers, I use the red clip lights on amplifiers to set gain structure.

The test of the iNuke amplifier is burst test not continuous, it stated in the test that the amp would shut down when tested with a sinewave which shows the amp can't produce it's rated 2,200 watts RMS into 4 ohms per channel continuously. It can only produce 1,700 watts burst for about 450ms. I read on a hi-fi forum that someone bench tested the iNuke 6000 and could only get 1,200 watts continuous at 40hz with a sinewave, anymore and the amp tripped and shut down.

I know about RMS limiters that's why I was thinking of getting an XTA DP226 next year.
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Chris Grimshaw

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Re: Behringer NX6000
« Reply #12 on: May 21, 2020, 09:01:21 am »

Clipping wise I always set gain structure of my system, dj mixer, loudspeaker management or crossover using a 400hz sinewave and a piezo

Where do you connect it, then?

33% duty cycle burst testing is pretty harsh. Pink noise is 12.5% duty cycle.
There's also continuous sine testing in the link I posted. There aren't many switch-mode amps that fare well there - even the venerable Powersoft K series throttle things back.

If you're convinced that you need a heavy welding amp because you want to reproduce sine waves at clip all night, then go ahead and buy the heavyweight option. It'll work fine. The switchmode amp will put out a little more power into 4ohm in the short term while using less power and weighing far less.


Either way, you've got the facts in front of you. It looks like you're convinced the Behringer is a pile of rubbish and you'll go with the QSC anyway, which begs the question: why did you bother asking?

Chris
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Jack Hawkins

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Re: Behringer NX6000
« Reply #13 on: May 21, 2020, 11:41:53 am »

Where do you connect it, then?

33% duty cycle burst testing is pretty harsh. Pink noise is 12.5% duty cycle.
There's also continuous sine testing in the link I posted. There aren't many switch-mode amps that fare well there - even the venerable Powersoft K series throttle things back.

If you're convinced that you need a heavy welding amp because you want to reproduce sine waves at clip all night, then go ahead and buy the heavyweight option. It'll work fine. The switchmode amp will put out a little more power into 4ohm in the short term while using less power and weighing far less.


Either way, you've got the facts in front of you. It looks like you're convinced the Behringer is a pile of rubbish and you'll go with the QSC anyway, which begs the question: why did you bother asking?

Chris

I already said a few comments back I don't run into clipping. I didn't say Behringer is a pile of rubbish did I stop making assumptions when I gave you no reason to think I mean that. With regards to the piezo and a 400hz sinewave tone you should know how to use a piezo for gain structure.
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John Schalk

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Re: Behringer NX6000
« Reply #14 on: May 21, 2020, 01:05:55 pm »

Here is a link to a prior discussion about this topic.  It includes some good information on how modern, and often inexpensive, class D amps can achieve their high output specs.  Art measured the NU4-6000, but he was bridging two channels, so that should translate pretty well to the results for a NU-6000. 

The NU4-6000 with  two bridged mono pairs driving four ohm loads just below the illumination of the clip/limit light each put out 85.5 volts at 60 Hz (1828 watts), 84.6 volts at 30 Hz (1789 watts), dropping the mains voltage on a 100' 10AWG 120v line from 118.1 volts down to 107.2 volts, drawing 31 amperes.

https://forums.prosoundweb.com/index.php/topic,153123.40.html
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Jack Hawkins

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Re: Behringer NX6000
« Reply #15 on: May 21, 2020, 01:42:44 pm »

Ok thanks, I might buy a Behringer NX6000 and then test it out on my subs at the same time as the RMX4050HD. I have four subs so two per amp, one per channel of each amp.
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Luke Geis

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Re: Behringer NX6000
« Reply #16 on: May 21, 2020, 02:50:33 pm »

Either way, there is only a 100 watt difference between the two amps then. That 100 watts is worth ZERO anything in terms of performance. So your choice boils down to versatility, weight, cost and control. The NX6000 is NOT a slouch and has proven to be reliable despite its parent brand. The RMX is certainly a workhorse amp, BUT, it is also extremely heavy and very limited in features. The NX6000 is a jack of all trades whereas the RMX is a one-trick pony. Ultimately, the NX6000 is just about equal to the RMX overall but has many more features that give it a huge advantage.
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Jack Hawkins

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Re: Behringer NX6000
« Reply #17 on: May 21, 2020, 03:45:55 pm »

I think my lack of confidence in amplifiers being able to deliver their rated output when only burst ratings are confirmed is due to not knowing how long it takes an amp to recover from sustained low frequency notes and be ready with enough power again for another. My knowledge of amplifiers is basic but I think if i'm right older transformer amplifiers have power caps don't they and output devices, I know a power cap cap stores electrical energy ready for when more power than the amplifier would otherwise be able to continuously provide due to long bass notes especially electornic as apposed to bass guitar. But do output devices make it possible for the amplifier to output all that power if needed? So less output devices means less power output?

Is a good analogy for power caps and output devices together like someone with big lung capacity (big lungs store a lot of air= big power capacitors store a lot of energy) being able to blow more air out continuously as if blowing candles out. And someone with small lung capacity (small lungs=small power capacitors) isn't able to blow so much air for so long. Plus an amplifier needs a big power supply or efficient power supply so it can drag as much power as it needs from the mains. Some of it to be stored in the capacitors. I know that probably sounds stupid but if the analogy is correct then I think I might understand it easier.
« Last Edit: May 21, 2020, 03:56:29 pm by Jack Hawkins »
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Chris Grimshaw

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Re: Behringer NX6000
« Reply #18 on: May 21, 2020, 05:48:49 pm »

The analogy sort-of holds, but consider this: switch-mode power supplies will refill their capacitors thousands of times per second, while the old iron will fill them at 100 or 120 times per second, depending on which country you're in.

Chris
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Art Welter

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Re: Behringer NX6000
« Reply #19 on: May 21, 2020, 06:49:06 pm »

The analogy sort-of holds, but consider this: switch-mode power supplies will refill their capacitors thousands of times per second, while the old iron will fill them at 100 or 120 times per second, depending on which country you're in.

Chris
And do that using only 50% of the mains power the "big lungs" require to move the same amount of air, while weighing in at less than 1/3 the weight!
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Re: Behringer NX6000
« Reply #19 on: May 21, 2020, 06:49:06 pm »


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