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Author Topic: What's a wattage minimum for a moving head to produce a constant beam?  (Read 1132 times)

Steve-White

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Re: What's a wattage minimum for a moving head to produce a constant beam?
« Reply #10 on: January 19, 2020, 11:56:39 am »

Yes, i've been using DMXIS and just recently upgraded to Show Buddy.

I just had a look at the specs for the Chauvet 155's.  Not bad for size/price.  17 degree rated beam angle is probably good for what you are looking for, not saying they (the 155's) are.  But, 17 degrees is a pretty tight beam angle.  I have a pair of Intimidator 260's and a pair of 375's in a DJ system I'm putting together.  Also have something called ADJ Inno Pocket Z4's which are also movers.  They have zoom and beam angle that will zoom from 10-60 degrees so they are versatile.

You are asking questions within the realm of lighting design.  Good, good, good.  Suggest you read some books on basic theatre lighting techniques.  Learn the 45 degree up and out, rim/halo, back lights, footlights and so on and how/why they are used.  Look at some dance lighting and of course concert lighting.

Since you are running DMX, I would keep the 155's - in the end they should serve you well.  Figure out what you want to do, maybe you can't get there within your budget and logistics, power demands, etc.  Maybe you can get there, or maybe you just need to tweak concept a bit.
« Last Edit: January 19, 2020, 12:08:55 pm by Steven A. White »
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Jeff Lelko

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Re: What's a wattage minimum for a moving head to produce a constant beam?
« Reply #11 on: January 19, 2020, 11:36:37 pm »

Any thoughts Eric?  We’ve given you some good advice - sharing more details about your desired application can help us recommend something that might work better for you, especially if using fog isn’t an option.

No, unless there is something in the air for the light beam to reflect off(dust, moisture, fog/haze) then the beam won't be visible no matter how powerful the fixture is.

Just for the sake of discussion, unless we’re lighting an ISO 1 cleanroom there will always be a fair amount of dust in the air.  From experience, a 10w green laser beam will generally be faintly visible in a dim room with no haze (assuming no scanning).  My Elation Sniper Pros (14R beam light) are a small step behind that but benefit from having a fatter beam, as would any high-output beam fixture.  None of this yields an impressive effect still nor takes the place of using haze or fog, nor would I find any of these fixtures appropriate to use in a bar band setting...     
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Dave Guilford

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Re: What's a wattage minimum for a moving head to produce a constant beam?
« Reply #12 on: January 26, 2020, 10:12:13 pm »

Intimidator 260s are solid.  If you’re ok with scammers- intim scan 305 is sharp too.  I wouldn’t get  anything dimmer than those. I think they are 60w LED
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Tim McCulloch

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Re: What's a wattage minimum for a moving head to produce a constant beam?
« Reply #13 on: February 03, 2020, 08:42:06 pm »

I recently bought a pair Chauvet Intimidator Spot Duo 155s that are rated @ 32W per bulb. I'm debating on taking them back because they do not throw a constant beam. Is there a general wattage minimum in order to achieve this?

I'll be running one on each side along with 4 LED Pars. I suppose I could purchase a faze machine to help but i'm worried most venues my band plays will not allow smoke or faze.

Faze? What's that?  Haze?  Not sure where you're located but in my locale the venues don't care unless it sets off the fire alarms.  Some venues specify that only water-based hazers are used (no DF-50 oil crackers) and others only allow oil crackers.  Go figure...

What do you mean by "constant beam", shafts of light?  Well there has to be something for those beam shafts to illuminate, and that's particles in the air - and that requires haze or other 'atmospherics' since cigarette smoking is largely banned indoors these days.  Going to brighter lights will not fix this.
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Steve-White

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Re: What's a wattage minimum for a moving head to produce a constant beam?
« Reply #14 on: February 04, 2020, 08:47:17 pm »

Fogger + Hazer = Fazer.  Could have something to do with water/glycol vs oil based fluid.

Some kind of BS marketing crap - they all shit suspended atmospheric particles out - some use pressure, some heat, some both, some use even more heat.  :)
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David Allred

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Re: What's a wattage minimum for a moving head to produce a constant beam?
« Reply #15 on: February 09, 2020, 09:24:36 am »

Fogger + Hazer = Fazer.  Could have something to do with water/glycol vs oil based fluid.

Some kind of BS marketing crap - they all shit suspended atmospheric particles out - some use pressure, some heat, some both, some use even more heat.  :)

Frazer uses the same heating principle as foggers to atomize the glycol, but at a constant low (suttle) rate, instead of a cloud plume. 
Hazers pop air by making bubbles.
Foggers/fazers pop water by heating.
Oil particles weigh less tha glycol particles, so oil hangs hangs longer in the air. 
Credit Big Clive for the simple  difference breakdown.
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Re: What's a wattage minimum for a moving head to produce a constant beam?
« Reply #15 on: February 09, 2020, 09:24:36 am »


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