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Author Topic: Any Old Newbies?  (Read 1637 times)

Tom Long

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Re: Any Old Newbies?
« Reply #20 on: December 24, 2019, 07:40:24 am »

Hello,
Thanks for a the great responses.
Collective wisdom (as in what have we learned!)
is priceless! I read an article in NYT about the joy of re- experiencing
experience. I think we are lucky to live long enough to do such.

As far as kids kicking my ass with gadgets, I don't think we will cross. I will be going after gigs where human talent is upfront. Classical, jazz, bluegrass... Remember key is fun this time.

If my daughter steps up to the plate, we will have to compete with plastic boxes and ipads!

For kickoff this summer a couple of gigs a month with old baby midas and outboard will serve.

Happy Holidays

Tom Long 
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Dave Pluke

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Re: Any Old Newbies?
« Reply #21 on: December 24, 2019, 11:06:15 am »

About the same story for me as the rest of the seniors her.  Coming back into it after a 30 year break in aerospace.

Similar story here as well.  In my third career, after 10 years on the road as a musician (also, the guy who designed and wired the systems), then 20+ years in Structural Engineering/IT.  Couldn't be happier to be hanging with creative types again and love the "in the moment" focus required for Live Events.

Although age discrimination does exist (i.e. "OK Boomer"), I've found others DO value the stability, experience, responsibility and "safe for all audiences" assets I can bring to the table (especially for Corporate work).

Hiring Authorities seem to appreciate not needing to worry about the hired help chasing tail, being too hung over to make the call time or spewing foul language in front of the Little Sisters of the Poor convention.

@Tom:  Sell your strengths and absorb new knowledge like a sponge and you should be fine.

Dave

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Tim McCulloch

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Re: Any Old Newbies?
« Reply #22 on: December 24, 2019, 01:36:58 pm »

Similar story here as well.  In my third career, after 10 years on the road as a musician (also, the guy who designed and wired the systems), then 20+ years in Structural Engineering/IT.  Couldn't be happier to be hanging with creative types again and love the "in the moment" focus required for Live Events.

Although age discrimination does exist (i.e. "OK Boomer"), I've found others DO value the stability, experience, responsibility and "safe for all audiences" assets I can bring to the table (especially for Corporate work).

Hiring Authorities seem to appreciate not needing to worry about the hired help chasing tail, being too hung over to make the call time or spewing foul language in front of the Little Sisters of the Poor convention.

@Tom:  Sell your strengths and absorb new knowledge like a sponge and you should be fine.

Dave

The age thing... sometimes the GrayBeard is an asset, sometimes not.  At a show earlier this year I was system tech in a new venue.  One of my crew also works there, and he's about half my age.  The headliner acts Mixerperson decided Boy was the go-to person even though I'd introduced myself as crew chief and system tech.  Same thing has happened a couple of times this year in other situations.

In the corporate world I don't stand out at all. ;D
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"Practicing an art, no matter how well or badly, is a way to make your soul grow, for heaven's sake. Sing in the shower. Dance to the radio. Tell stories. Write a poem to a friend, even a lousy poem. Do it as well as you possible can. You will get an enormous reward. You will have created something."  - Kurt Vonnegut

Mike Caldwell

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Re: Any Old Newbies?
« Reply #23 on: December 24, 2019, 02:00:42 pm »

  Ok... so I might as well not said anything as he mixed us basically the opposite of everything I'd asked:  "killer cave your chest in lead-kick drum", shred your face off cymbals, vocals buried and swimming in FX all the time, indistinguishable lead instrument work... and I'm guessing a big ole smiley-face EQ settings as it was monster low-end, icepick to the ears high-end, and a goosh of mud in the middle... and way too stinking loud.  I was hit-up from audience members "what's up with our sound?!"... in the presence of the sound dude... he said "he's working on it"... while he was feverishly dithering away on his tablet. :-\

Did I mention his binky... um "tablet"... and how it's seemingly all he knows? :-\

Ok... rant "off".

Yep I've heard that mix too many times from generally younger folk at the mixer.....but not always!
Kind of makes you wonder what they listen for enjoyment that they reference to building ALL of their mixes to!
Getting boom and sizzle is easy, what's in between is the hard part.
Getting them to realize they don't need to use every effect, processing and plug in on every channel
is even harder.

John P. Farrell

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Re: Any Old Newbies?
« Reply #24 on: December 24, 2019, 02:18:43 pm »

Main reason is initial cost.
When I can buy 6- KT Dn 360's for $600.00! Also I have to get up to speed again, Ha! Am also thinking a little knob turning could help a young person understand flow. If there's a phase 2 certainly a slicker setup will merit itself.

Got a Driverack 260 and will be buying some amps next month.
Looks like Crown XTI's fit the bill.
Bought a nice spx990 for $150, a pcm 42 for much more!

Tom Long

$600 into an analog desk, $600 into EQ's, $150 plus a couple hundred more into FX, and all the cabling = far more than you would've paid for a small digital desk that has 4 times the capability of the analog rig.  I would stop buying into the audio museum and start looking for a rig that fits into the back of an SUV and does as much as a PM4K used to do. Welcome back to the business! 

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Scott Holtzman

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Re: Any Old Newbies?
« Reply #25 on: December 24, 2019, 04:57:24 pm »

$600 into an analog desk, $600 into EQ's, $150 plus a couple hundred more into FX, and all the cabling = far more than you would've paid for a small digital desk that has 4 times the capability of the analog rig.  I would stop buying into the audio museum and start looking for a rig that fits into the back of an SUV and does as much as a PM4K used to do. Welcome back to the business!

You won't get any business with an analog rig either.   Especially at the low end.  Nobody wants to give up space anymore.  Talking about the lounge level work the OP referenced.


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Tim McCulloch

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Re: Any Old Newbies?
« Reply #26 on: December 24, 2019, 05:23:08 pm »

Hello,
Thanks for a the great responses.
Collective wisdom (as in what have we learned!)
is priceless! I read an article in NYT about the joy of re- experiencing
experience. I think we are lucky to live long enough to do such.

As far as kids kicking my ass with gadgets, I don't think we will cross. I will be going after gigs where human talent is upfront. Classical, jazz, bluegrass... Remember key is fun this time.

If my daughter steps up to the plate, we will have to compete with plastic boxes and ipads!

For kickoff this summer a couple of gigs a month with old baby midas and outboard will serve.

Happy Holidays

Tom Long

Hi Tom-

I have one more little story to tell and I promise I'll stop.. at least in this thread!

A decade or so back I figured I'd need to be up to speed on this new-fangled "digital thang" all the kids were talking about.  Oh, I knew how audio was digitized and what the up/down sides were but what I didn't have was any significant first hand experience.  Ebay had a listing for a Yamaha 01v (the original silver face with short faders) for $400.  I bought it and considered it my tuition at the Skool of Digital.

I downloaded the manual, gave it a good look over, and unpacked the mixer.  In a couple of hours I'd been able to make a microphone work, a CD player to work, and figured out the EFX and auxiliary mixes.  Then I put it in a plastic bag and put it away.  Months later I'm prepping for a gig we do every year:  a church youth convention for about 500 kids and their adult sponsors.  Usual stuff of guest presenters & speakers, skits and music, and on the last day after lunch, we convert the gym into a space for Mass, so lav on the Bishop, etc.  I decided that this gig was the one I took the 01v to.  I still carried the analog FOH in the truck if I needed it (and at one point considered it) but ended up using the 01v.  I'll skip the gig details but when it was all said and done the 01v gave me the assets to better deliver on my promises to the client, compared to the analog setup I'd been using.  The 4 band parametric EQ on each input and output, dynamics processing on each input and comp/limit available for each output... SPX-90 level FX.  For $400 delivered to my door.  That was it, I'd seen the metaphorical light and analog was Darkness.

Digital mixers are part of why I think it's a great time to be in audio.  All the stuff we *wished* we could do 20 years ago, like dynamics on every input an A/B monitoring/PFL buses (the Paragon II was as close as analog got), etc is now possible, and much more.  Try to get some time with a contemporary digital mixer, Tom, and I think you'll be excited by the possibilities it will trigger from your SoundGuy memories.

Restoring old gear to re-experience the past isn't a bad thing, it's just a bad commercial decision once you've clients uninterested in the pedigree, history or love you've invested.  This is why I said the kids with new toys will kick your ass - their rigs do more, weigh less, and take up less space - because gear nostalgia has a limited commercial market outside the eye of the beholder.  I agree that for demonstrating signal flow and gain structure the hands-on physicality of analog is hard to beat.
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"Practicing an art, no matter how well or badly, is a way to make your soul grow, for heaven's sake. Sing in the shower. Dance to the radio. Tell stories. Write a poem to a friend, even a lousy poem. Do it as well as you possible can. You will get an enormous reward. You will have created something."  - Kurt Vonnegut

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Re: Any Old Newbies?
« Reply #26 on: December 24, 2019, 05:23:08 pm »


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