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Author Topic: non pro sound advice on the lounge  (Read 2408 times)

Jonathan Johnson

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Re: non pro sound advice on the lounge
« Reply #30 on: January 26, 2020, 12:17:06 am »

I've started using those thin bungee cord loops with the ball on one end (often sold as tarp straps) to wrap around my coiled cables.

They're not attached to the cable, but the big ol ball makes them easy to find if you get a color other than black. They don't seem to tangle too badly when tossed in a case during the gig.

The only thing you gotta watch out for is that you don't let go of it so the ball goes flying and raps you in the knuckles (or other tender parts).

They are available at the big box home improvement centers, but they are kind of long. Shorter ones are available online.
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Stop confusing the issue with facts and logic!

Spenser Hamilton

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Re: non pro sound advice on the lounge
« Reply #31 on: January 26, 2020, 11:58:13 pm »

Stage-handing and seeing how other shops did their cables led me to a couple of conclusions, the first is:  every way of tying/restraining coils of cable have shortcomings.  Second?  Of all the ways I dislike velcro the most - if it's loose you misplace or lose them, if it's attached to the male end of the cable it will "stick" to the other cables at the snake head or splitter, and if you put them on the female it, it's sticking up somewhere you'd rather not see it.  If you use tie/trick line it unravels and gets hard to tie.

Of those, I'll take the tie line issues as the lesser of evils.

Re: name changers... his name appears to be Andy Olsen.  Perhaps the lack of a space is confusing?

I concur, trick line tied to the male end, burn the tips with a lighter and it holds up for a long time.

On heavy snake cables you can use the trick line to tie off to a rack handle for some extra strain relief.
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Doug Fowler

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Re: non pro sound advice on the lounge
« Reply #32 on: January 27, 2020, 10:51:20 am »

Ditto.

I've been putting an overhand knot of the male end around cable coils for 40 years. I still use cables that go back that far. As long as you tension it by pulling on the cable, not the connector, I've seen no evidence of harm to the cable. And I don't have to find the string, or unstick the velcro, or deal with tape supply and disposal, or...

Loose overhand knot for me as well. No loose/frayed/sticky bits, no tension on the "knot".

AC cable, Speakon etc get tie line.
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Tim Hite

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Re: non pro sound advice on the lounge
« Reply #33 on: January 27, 2020, 11:50:33 am »

Rip-tie makes the fanciest line of velcro solutions. I use them for a number of things not production related.

I tried Rip-tie on my production cables and ended up switching to tie line for the reasons mentioned by previous posters. Mostly, it's just faster.
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Re: non pro sound advice on the lounge
« Reply #33 on: January 27, 2020, 11:50:33 am »


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