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Author Topic: Random electric shock on vocal mics  (Read 1059 times)

Miguel Dahl

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Re: Random electric shock on vocal mics
« Reply #10 on: December 02, 2019, 02:24:43 pm »

Since it's random, make sure it's not just a discharge of potential they build up when walking on the stage. If they can touch the mic and have an even flow of zzzzzap then it seems like it's electrical. But you mentioned that there were people without guitars.

Since I've seen it's story-time, I have one short one. I didn't work this gig myself, but colleagues did, so kind of lame but still. World wide TV-event. TV-Hosts were people you all know who are. Stage floor was plexi-glass. Built up a potential. Solution? Touch the (muted) mic to discharge then speak into it. TBH I don't get this to compute since they were on WL. But from what I've heard there was a mic on stand and this the solution.
« Last Edit: December 02, 2019, 02:29:14 pm by Miguel Dahl »
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Kevin Maxwell

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Re: Random electric shock on vocal mics
« Reply #11 on: December 02, 2019, 02:30:05 pm »

This is about getting zapped but a bit off topic here. Whenever I had a problem with a car and I was trying to see if I had a spark I would disconnect one of the spark plug wires and have one of my brothers hold it near the plug and tell him to look for a spark when I try to start the car. I donít remember them ever telling me they saw a spark but when they would yell from getting zapped I would know I had spark. So the on topic part here is you canít always see the spark due to the lighting. 
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Ike Zimbel

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Re: Random electric shock on vocal mics
« Reply #12 on: December 02, 2019, 03:47:41 pm »

Most of the time I'll even touch the guitar strings and at the same time touch the microphone with my lips to make sure before they even use it. I never want an artist to do something I wouldn't do myself and it gives some peace of mind to me and them. If there is a problem you can see a spark between their strings and the microphone. Fast way to check.

Douglas R. Allen
There's a safer way to do that test: Hold the guitar by the neck, with some of your fingers touching the strings. With the SAME hand, reach out your little finger and touch the mic grille. That way, the current does not pass through your body.
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Douglas R. Allen

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Re: Random electric shock on vocal mics
« Reply #13 on: December 02, 2019, 05:20:18 pm »

There's a safer way to do that test: Hold the guitar by the neck, with some of your fingers touching the strings. With the SAME hand, reach out your little finger and touch the mic grille. That way, the current does not pass through your body.

   Nice tip. For me I seem to have a high tolerance to voltage. I can work on and have been shocked with 120v being on when it shouldn't have been ( co-worker, yeah, yeah, its off...) and it doesn't much more than tickle to me but I do try to avoid it  ;). 220 volts of course I check for myself!  I'll keep your tip in mind the next time I'm out and about.

    Thanks;

    Douglas R. Allen
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Re: Random electric shock on vocal mics
¬ę Reply #13 on: December 02, 2019, 05:20:18 pm ¬Ľ


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