Sound Reinforcement - Forums for Live Sound Professionals - Your Displayed Name Must Be Your Real Full Name To Post In The Live Sound Forums > Wireless and Communications

Shure Axient Digital X55 Band [941MHz-960MHz]

<< < (3/5) > >>

Henry Cohen:

--- Quote from: Scott Holtzman on November 27, 2019, 03:22:27 AM ---Including if I recall quite a bit of medical telemetry gear operates in that region.  You could wipe out a nearby hospital wireless cardiac monitors.
--- End quote ---

Nope. Wireless Medical Telemetry bands are 608-614 MHz (TV ch 37), 1395-1400 MHz and 1427-1432 MHz.

Scott Helmke:

--- Quote from: Jason Glass on November 25, 2019, 10:09:33 PM ---You MUST, absolutely MUST, do an FCC ULS geographic search for your operating location and frequency range (I suggest a 5 mile radius and examine each licensee's map for TX vs. RX stations.  Avoid all RX within 5 mi and all freqs with P2P paths crossing within 1 mi of your location), and calculate your freqs to avoid each primary licensee's carriers, with appropriate channel freq spacings per emission designator.

Then you MUST, absolutely MUST contact the local SBE freq coordinator and request coordination approval for your freqs.  I suggest 1 week in advance.  Then, when you get on site, do a scan and add any newly found carriers to your coordination math, then do it all again and beg "Mia culpa" if you require an amended coord request.

--- End quote ---

Jason, could you expand on those two items a little, maybe a link or just spell out the acronyms?

I do get the occasional X band request, generally from somebody who is a TV broadcaster and presumably has a part 74 license, but the coordination is done by me for a local Big 10 school.

Henry Cohen:

--- Quote from: Scott Helmke on November 27, 2019, 10:02:50 AM ---Jason, could you expand on those two items a little, maybe a link or just spell out the acronyms?
--- End quote ---

ULS = FCC's Universal Licensing System

SBE = Society of Broadcast Engineers, more specifically, the local SBE coordinators



--- Quote ---I do get the occasional X band request, generally from somebody who is a TV broadcaster and presumably has a part 74 license, but the coordination is done by me for a local Big 10 school.
--- End quote ---

The broadcaster may or may not be licensed for 941-960 (or the previous 944-952 MHz). The other important question is, does TC have an STL license? (No, according to the ULS, unless it's under another name.) If you're not following Jason's description of the rules, the consequences, legal and operational, could be significant.

Jason Glass:

--- Quote from: Henry Cohen on November 27, 2019, 10:41:02 AM ---ULS = FCC's Universal Licensing System

SBE = Society of Broadcast Engineers, more specifically, the local SBE coordinators


The broadcaster may or may not be licensed for 941-960 (or the previous 944-952 MHz). The other important question is, does TC have an STL license? (No, according to the ULS, unless it's under another name.) If you're not following Jason's description of the rules, the consequences, legal and operational, could be significant.

--- End quote ---

There's a loophole in the rules that allows Part 74 licensees to operate in any legal Part 74 band, even those not specified in the license, for up to *I think* 720 hours per year.

Henry Cohen:

--- Quote from: Jason Glass on November 27, 2019, 11:54:53 AM ---There's a loophole in the rules that allows Part 74 licensees to operate in any legal Part 74 band, even those not specified in the license, for up to *I think* 720 hours per year.
--- End quote ---

Not a loophole; an explicitly stated rule. 47CFR Part 74.24 permits licensed Part 73 broadcasters to operate up to 720 hours/year/frequency on any subpart D, E, F and H bands/services. So yes, the broadcast customer could operate legally, given the appropriate coordination with the local SBE, but the rental house can not [without the appropriate Part 74 license].

Navigation

[0] Message Index

[#] Next page

[*] Previous page

Go to full version