Sound Reinforcement - Forums for Live Sound Professionals - Your Displayed Name Must Be Your Real Full Name To Post In The Live Sound Forums > AC Power and Grounding

The old “Which receptacle on which circuit” question. Anything new?

(1/3) > >>

dave briar:
Rest assured I have no interest in beating this same old dead horse needlessly. I’ve spent much of this morning reading old posts going back to the early 2000’s on the subject including Tom Cornish’s paper on Power Distribution as well as numerous posts by Mike Sokol. I’m aware of the “measure voltage then apply load and measure which receptacles show lower voltage” method as well as “circuit tracing” appliances (plug RF transmitter into receptacle and sniff the breaker at the panel) but it seems numerous forum members have gotten spurious results even when used as intended let alone trying to use the receiver not on the panel but on other receptacles (when the panel is not accessible).

My question: shouldn’t it in theory be possible to build a two-unit tool comprised of a similar transmitter (to plug into one receptacle) and sort of an enhanced receptacle tester that had an additional test/light to show whether the RF signal is present or not when plugged into another receptacle?  I’m assuming, possibly incorrectly, that having both units in direct contact with the circuit would potentially allow more robust detection of the RF than the non-contact “circuit tracing at the panel” tools.  Yes/no?  If yes, is our use case just too limited to warrant manufacturers investing in the solution, or, does this product already exist and I’ve just wasted a lot of my Sunday being ignorant of it?

John Roberts {JR}:
I am pretty sure they already exist, but you can probably search the internet too...

JR

Philip Roberts:
How does your proposed tester identify the difference between another outlet On the same breaker but not combined til it hits the panel vs another outlet that’s on a different breaker but on the same phase .....

:/

Philip

Jean-Pierre Coetzee:
Quick diagram demonstrating what Philip said:

If you connect anything transmitting a signal into receptacle 1 and you plug another device listening for that signal into receptacle 2 the listening device will pickup the sending device even though these are on two different circuit breakers. Here in South Africa the same would be true for something transmitting on the neutral or the ground line as well, where you are it might be different.

The only solution would be to turn off all the breakers and then do the test with a battery powered device but at that point wouldn't it take as much work as just killing a breaker and measuring each outlet for voltage?

Tim Weaver:

--- Quote from: Philip Roberts on October 20, 2019, 11:37:53 pm ---How does your proposed tester identify the difference between another outlet On the same breaker but not combined til it hits the panel vs another outlet that’s on a different breaker but on the same phase .....

:/

Philip

--- End quote ---

I know it's not the answer that would work for us, but you could turn all the breakers off. Then it would work. Unless you have some ground/neutral swaps somewhere. Maybe you could have a devise that's smart enough to determine that too. Say one freq on ground, another freq on neutral. Then the common would be the Line. The receiver could tell you which freq it was getting, and light up some appropriate lights.

Navigation

[0] Message Index

[#] Next page

Go to full version