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Author Topic: "This Is Your Brain on Music" by Daniel Levitin  (Read 175 times)

Frank Koenig

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"This Is Your Brain on Music" by Daniel Levitin
« on: October 30, 2019, 11:14:41 am »

This might be something for your winter reading list. I just finished this 2006 book on the neurological and psychological basis of music. Levitin, a former record producer, is now a neuroscientist at McGill and tries to understand why there even is such a thing as music and how it is processed in the mind. You can breeze through some of the introductory parts where he defines timbre, etc., but it gets pretty intense and interesting after that. His deep knowledge of popular music of the 20th century, from which he draws many examples, is pretty entertaining for people of a certain age.

--Frank
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Nick Pires

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Re: "This Is Your Brain on Music" by Daniel Levitin
« Reply #1 on: October 30, 2019, 12:08:19 pm »

This might be something for your winter reading list. I just finished this 2006 book on the neurological and psychological basis of music. Levitin, a former record producer, is now a neuroscientist at McGill and tries to understand why there even is such a thing as music and how it is processed in the mind. You can breeze through some of the introductory parts where he defines timbre, etc., but it gets pretty intense and interesting after that. His deep knowledge of popular music of the 20th century, from which he draws many examples, is pretty entertaining for people of a certain age.

--Frank
Just replying to second that this is, in fact, and amazing read (regardless of age).
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Ike Zimbel

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Re: "This Is Your Brain on Music" by Daniel Levitin
« Reply #2 on: October 30, 2019, 12:09:03 pm »

This might be something for your winter reading list. I just finished this 2006 book on the neurological and psychological basis of music. Levitin, a former record producer, is now a neuroscientist at McGill and tries to understand why there even is such a thing as music and how it is processed in the mind. You can breeze through some of the introductory parts where he defines timbre, etc., but it gets pretty intense and interesting after that. His deep knowledge of popular music of the 20th century, from which he draws many examples, is pretty entertaining for people of a certain age.

--Frank
Yes, he gave the keynote at an AES convention in NYC a few years ago and it was entertaining and thought provoking. One demo he did was playing a clip of the first note of "Magical Mystery Tour", which was instantly recognizable. It reminded me of when I was mixing (mostly back in the 1980's)...I would often find that I would rely on the various tonal cues of the band getting ready for the next song, more than the set list.
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Chris Hindle

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Re: "This Is Your Brain on Music" by Daniel Levitin
« Reply #3 on: October 30, 2019, 12:18:16 pm »

Yes, he gave the keynote at an AES convention in NYC a few years ago and it was entertaining and thought provoking. One demo he did was playing a clip of the first note of "Magical Mystery Tour", which was instantly recognizable. It reminded me of when I was mixing (mostly back in the 1980's)...I would often find that I would rely on the various tonal cues of the band getting ready for the next song, more than the set list.
A band i worked for (5 year stretch, 70+ shows a year) NEVER had a set list.
My cues were who is moving where. Closer to a wedge, changeout a guitar etc.
Oh, the first 2 notes too.
Sometimes they'd play something new...... No autopilot on that one....
Chris.
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ProSoundWeb Community

Re: "This Is Your Brain on Music" by Daniel Levitin
« Reply #3 on: October 30, 2019, 12:18:16 pm »


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