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Mystery GFCI trip -- solved!

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Bob Faulkner:

--- Quote from: Frank Koenig on October 05, 2019, 07:35:02 pm ---This is a little embarrassing, and maybe a little funny, and MAYBE a little useful to someone who's as much of a dufus as I am. A friend has a ~50 ft piece of 14-3 SOOW, with a plug on one end and a 4-box on the other, that someone gave him. It was giving him "trouble". I agree to look at it.

The plug end was kind of effed-up but the plug itself looked good so I snipped off the end and rewired the plug. I plug it into the GFCI receptacle above the workbench and it promptly and repeatably  trips. OK. I Ohm-out the cord which shows as open between all conductors on the Fluke meter (> 100 M Ohm or so). I inspect it. I keep plugging and it keeps tripping the GFCI. I get out a leakage tester and measure it -- no measurable AC leakage. I'm composing in my head the post to this forum about the great mystery. I note that the GFCI trips when there is downward force on the plug. I repeat the Ohmmeter and leakage tester experiments while vigorously wiggling the cord as it leaves the plug. No joy.

Then... it dawns on me. The fat Hubble plug is pushing the "test" button on the GFCI every time the cord gets pulled in that direction. I move the cord to the lower receptacle of the duplex where it can't diddle the button and all is good. Doh!

--Frank


--- End quote ---
At least that's all it was!

Taylor Hall:

--- Quote from: Frank Koenig on October 05, 2019, 07:35:02 pm ---This is a little embarrassing, and maybe a little funny, and MAYBE a little useful to someone who's as much of a dufus as I am. A friend has a ~50 ft piece of 14-3 SOOW, with a plug on one end and a 4-box on the other, that someone gave him. It was giving him "trouble". I agree to look at it.

The plug end was kind of effed-up but the plug itself looked good so I snipped off the end and rewired the plug. I plug it into the GFCI receptacle above the workbench and it promptly and repeatably  trips. OK. I Ohm-out the cord which shows as open between all conductors on the Fluke meter (> 100 M Ohm or so). I inspect it. I keep plugging and it keeps tripping the GFCI. I get out a leakage tester and measure it -- no measurable AC leakage. I'm composing in my head the post to this forum about the great mystery. I note that the GFCI trips when there is downward force on the plug. I repeat the Ohmmeter and leakage tester experiments while vigorously wiggling the cord as it leaves the plug. No joy.

Then... it dawns on me. The fat Hubble plug is pushing the "test" button on the GFCI every time the cord gets pulled in that direction. I move the cord to the lower receptacle of the duplex where it can't diddle the button and all is good. Doh!

--Frank

--- End quote ---
I had the exact same thing happen to me on a tile saw I had rented a few years back. Hubble end, kept hitting the reset button! Thankfully there was another outlet down the line I could use.

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