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dry audio track from publishers

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Andy Bumpus:
We sometimes receive "dry" audio tracks (choir accompaniment) from certain publishers that sound like the old am radio.  What effects should I start with to liven them up a bit?

Scott Holtzman:

--- Quote from: AndyBump on September 17, 2019, 11:40:44 am ---We sometimes receive "dry" audio tracks (choir accompaniment) from certain publishers that sound like the old am radio.  What effects should I start with to liven them up a bit?

--- End quote ---

If you want help you need to follow our rule on real, verifiable names as disclosed at signup.  If "Andy Bump" is your real name then apologies, but put a space in (not a requirement).

Andy Bumpus:

--- Quote from: Scott Holtzman on September 17, 2019, 12:39:04 pm ---If you want help you need to follow our rule on real, verifiable names as disclosed at signup.  If "Andy Bump" is your real name then apologies, but put a space in (not a requirement).

--- End quote ---
Sorry to have offended.  I admit I did not read the fine print, so I missed that.  Andy Bumpus is the "real" name.  Anyone care to comment on the "real" topic?

Jason Glass:

--- Quote from: AndyBump on September 17, 2019, 02:50:46 pm ---Sorry to have offended.  I admit I did not read the fine print, so I missed that.  Andy Bumpus is the "real" name.  Anyone care to comment on the "real" topic?

--- End quote ---

Not until you obey the rules and correct your name.  AndyBump does not equal Andy Bumpus.  Details matter in audio engineering, they matter in life, and they matter on this forum.

Jason Glass:

--- Quote from: Andy Bumpus on September 17, 2019, 11:40:44 am ---We sometimes receive "dry" audio tracks (choir accompaniment) from certain publishers that sound like the old am radio.  What effects should I start with to liven them up a bit?

--- End quote ---

Hi Andy,

This seems like one of those rare instances where inserting "aural exciter" or "sonic maximizer" processing on the input channel may help.  They generally attempt to add artificial harmonics to the source signal to simulate a wider frequency response.

If the dynamic range is too compressed, you could try inserting an expander to give it more apparent range, but it's tricky and might not sound natural.

If the tracks are mono and you're mixing in stereo, try splitting the signal to two input channels, pan them hard left and right, and experiment with delaying one side by 5 to 20 milliseconds.  This can sometimes really work well.  If you can slightly pitch shift or detune one side, it can get huge sounding.  Just don't make it extreme or it'll make everything else sound out-of-tune.

These delay and pitch tricks can sometimes have amazing results, even with limited bandwidth from the source.  BTW, they are the basis of flanger and chorus effects, so experimenting with those is also worthwhile.  Beware, though, that all of this can be very destructive to the signal if the stereo mix is summed to mono.

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