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Author Topic: Pr pilot 150 issue  (Read 2446 times)

Thomas joseph Phillips

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Pr pilot 150 issue
« on: August 31, 2019, 09:08:13 pm »

First of all, thanks for taking the time. I appreciate any help. I've been a mobile DJ since 01 but never made the move to dmx. So I bought 6  of these moving heads. Not a brand I've heard of before but I felt in this day every brand is bringing something to the table. So when I plug them in I get a breif clicking jerking thing but it stops and they pun automatically. So I have been trying to attach my obey10 controller so I can really use them but I can't get my controller to attach. I'm new to dmx and reading the manual it doesn't really follow what the display is doing. Is there anyone here using these that can mabey work with me.
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Jeff Lelko

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Re: Pr pilot 150 issue
« Reply #1 on: August 31, 2019, 10:41:12 pm »

Is there anyone here using these that can mabey work with me.

Yes, I still own a similar series of fixture, but before I or anyone else can help you’ll need to change your user name to your actual full name per the policy you agreed to when signing up.  Thanks!
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Thomas joseph Phillips

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Re: Pr pilot 150 issue
« Reply #2 on: August 31, 2019, 11:09:37 pm »

Done
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Jeff Lelko

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Re: Pr pilot 150 issue
« Reply #3 on: September 01, 2019, 01:17:49 am »

Thanks.  So these are unit made by Omnisistem.  They’re an older model that has been around since the early 2000s I believe.  I really hope you didn’t pay the $900/unit price on their website, but I digress. 

The “clicking jerking” you describe is a calibration sequence that the units go through during power-up to home their various attributes (pan, tilt, color, etc.).  This process will usually take around 20 seconds or so and then the unit is ready to use.  The lamp should come on automatically with these units (my incarnation of this type of fixture does), but correct me if yours don’t. 

I’d strongly suggest watching some DXM 101 videos online to help things make sense.  DMX is very straightforward but can be tricky to those just starting out.  To begin with, your controller doesn’t “attach” to your lights.  All it does is broadcast an industry-standard protocol to any devices that might be listening.  You controller has no idea how many lights are connected nor what they are - it’s just sending information that the light fixtures use to follow instructions. 

The manual for your lights will discuss the various “modes” that your fixtures can be run in, but I don’t recall anything complex here.  The only thing you should need to do is set a starting address.  DMX consists of 512 discrete channels of information.  Your lights can read all the data they need off 6 (or 8 ) of those channels.  Which of the 512 consecutive channels those are is up to you.  I’d start with fixture 1 on channel 1, fixture 2 on channel 9 (if you’re using 8-channe mode), fixture 3 on channel 17, and so on.  As an aside, setting two fixtures to the same address will cause them to execute identical behavior.  Setting one fixture to, say, channel 1 and another to channel 2 will work (as in you won’t break anything), but the output from your controller will be commanding different attributes on the different fixtures from the same fader.  This makes things nearly impossible to control, especially on complex fixtures.  In other words, you generally never overlap addresses/channels.   

Now, where things might get a little complicated is how your controller is designed to control “fixtures”.  Certain controllers such as the one you bought prefer to work in a fixed-format of fixture addressing.  This means that while your fixtures only need 6 or 8 channels to work, your controller assumes that they need (up to) 16.  While there’s no harm in this, it can make programming tricky and painful if you want to get the most out of your board.  Because of this, you’ll need to address your fixtures as 1, 17, 33, 49, 65, and 81.  You can find this in the Obey’s manual. 

Once you get that taken care of you should be able to control each fixture with the faders on the controller.  The manual for the lights will tell you what each channel will do.  From there, you’ll want to create your programs/chases that use many of each unit’s attributes in a way that’s tasteful for the type of shows you’re playing.  There are plenty of tutorials on how to program chases on the Obey boards, so I’d recommend just watching those and following along.  Good luck and hope this helps!
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Re: Pr pilot 150 issue
« Reply #3 on: September 01, 2019, 01:17:49 am »


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