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Author Topic: RF in the UK  (Read 597 times)

DavidTurner

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RF in the UK
« on: August 08, 2019, 04:11:36 pm »

I have a one off coming up in northern England. What are the steps required to obtain a license for using IEMs and instrument/vocal wireless? The festival's policy is that all wireless be provided at the Artist's expense.

TIA

DT
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Mac Kerr

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Re: RF in the UK
« Reply #1 on: August 08, 2019, 04:26:43 pm »

I have a one off coming up in northern England. What are the steps required to obtain a license for using IEMs and instrument/vocal wireless? The festival's policy is that all wireless be provided at the Artist's expense.

Rent them from a UK vendor. It is much easier to let them do the licensing than to try to work it out for your self.

Mac
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Daniel Levi

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Re: RF in the UK
« Reply #2 on: August 08, 2019, 04:57:14 pm »

If you do want to "go it alone" here are the rules,

https://www.ofcom.org.uk/manage-your-licence/radiocommunication-licences/pmse/pmse-licence-info

Basically you can use any frequency from 863.1-864.9 Mhz UHF without a licence, generally 4 wireless channels is the hard limit or 173.700-175.10MHz VHF. These channels (esp. the UHF ones) are used by many wireless audio devices as it's the only UHF licence free band so is more likely that any other option to get interference.

If more channels are needed then a shared user licence is available, this allows the use of CH38 (or there are some VHF channels available for a separate charge) and Ofcom reckons up to 10 wireless devices (channels) can be used, though these are usable by anyone, anywhere with a licence, so naturally interference could be a problem.

Lastly there is a fixed site licence. This is a coordinated licence that allows specific frequencies to be used outside what is available on (the sliver of) CH70 and CH38 on a case by case basis at a specific site ONLY, these are available for as little 15min and are coordinated so as not to interfere (in theory) with other users, Ofcom will support instances of interference on this channel. 
« Last Edit: August 08, 2019, 05:00:16 pm by Daniel Levi »
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Ike Zimbel

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Re: RF in the UK
« Reply #3 on: August 08, 2019, 07:46:30 pm »

Rent them from a UK vendor. It is much easier to let them do the licensing than to try to work it out for your self.

Mac
+1 SSE is in that part of the UK. They can supply the gear and arrange the license. In addition to what Daniel Levi posted here, I can tell you that I have licensed and used the following IEM bands in the UK: Shure PSM-1000 G10, J8E, K10E, and Sennheiser Aw, Aw+ and Gw. I also had Shure and Sennheiser mics and RAD IC transmits in the 470-698 MHz range within the last year.
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~Ike Zimbel~
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John Sulek

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Re: RF in the UK
« Reply #4 on: August 09, 2019, 11:09:26 am »

+1 SSE is in that part of the UK. They can supply the gear and arrange the license. In addition to what Daniel Levi posted here, I can tell you that I have licensed and used the following IEM bands in the UK: Shure PSM-1000 G10, J8E, K10E, and Sennheiser Aw, Aw+ and Gw. I also had Shure and Sennheiser mics and RAD IC transmits in the 470-698 MHz range within the last year.

If you are using your own gear...Ofcom assigns a coordinator to large events like festivals.
That contact person will sort out your freqs and licences.
The online registration will be locked out for large events.
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DavidTurner

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Re: RF in the UK
« Reply #5 on: August 10, 2019, 12:46:25 am »

Thanks to all of you for your prompt replies.

DT

ftp://
I have a one off coming up in northern England. What are the steps required to obtain a license for using IEMs and instrument/vocal wireless? The festival's policy is that all wireless be provided at the Artist's expense.

TIA

DT
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John Sulek

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Re: RF in the UK
« Reply #6 on: August 11, 2019, 04:46:40 am »

Thanks to all of you for your prompt replies.

DT

ftp://
Another vote for SSE. Never had a problem.
Adlib could also sort out a nice kit for you.
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ProSoundWeb Community

Re: RF in the UK
« Reply #6 on: August 11, 2019, 04:46:40 am »


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