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Author Topic: Looking for Guidance on Designing Scenes Sequences  (Read 6301 times)

Joe Valente

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Re: Looking for Guidance on Designing Scenes Sequences
« Reply #10 on: July 31, 2019, 08:39:48 am »

When choosing two colors, I choose harmonious colors. I use THIS color wheel tool a lot to determine what colors work together.

As for fronts, instead of just a plain white- use something a bit warmer. I tend to use R = 100%, G = 75%, B = 5%, W = 0%. Plain white can look a little garish.
Thanks for that colour wheel -- it's GENIUS!

For "whites" for stage front, I go for bright, but with a pink hue. That means (working from memory) 100%/80%/70%/100% (R/G/B/W).
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Taylor Hall

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Re: Looking for Guidance on Designing Scenes Sequences
« Reply #11 on: July 31, 2019, 08:54:41 am »

To make life a bit easier, you can also get dedicated white fixtures that take all the guesswork out of brute-forcing an RGB fixture to a particular temperature.

We have 5 ADJ TW-12 fixtures that can cover a 30x20 stage with ease, but smaller versions exist that would be more than enough for your application: https://www.pssl.com/American-DJ-Flat-Par-TW12-DMX-White-LED-Wash-Light-2

Also having even the smallest amount of fog/haze in the air (assuming the venue is cool with it) will make a huge difference in impact like Steve suggested.
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Joe Valente

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Re: Looking for Guidance on Designing Scenes Sequences
« Reply #12 on: July 31, 2019, 10:28:47 am »

To make life a bit easier, you can also get dedicated white fixtures that take all the guesswork out of brute-forcing an RGB fixture to a particular temperature.

We have 5 ADJ TW-12 fixtures that can cover a 30x20 stage with ease, but smaller versions exist that would be more than enough for your application: https://www.pssl.com/American-DJ-Flat-Par-TW12-DMX-White-LED-Wash-Light-2

Also having even the smallest amount of fog/haze in the air (assuming the venue is cool with it) will make a huge difference in impact like Steve suggested.

How do you keep those whites from washing out the rest of your stage? Looks like a good idea -- washes -- but I'm using spots right now and I still struggle to keep it all from washing out.
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Taylor Hall

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Re: Looking for Guidance on Designing Scenes Sequences
« Reply #13 on: July 31, 2019, 10:54:44 am »

How do you keep those whites from washing out the rest of your stage? Looks like a good idea -- washes -- but I'm using spots right now and I still struggle to keep it all from washing out.
Play with intensity values and try using diffusers with washes. You don't have to run fixtures at 100% all the time, so sometimes less is more since light is an additive element. Here again is where thoughtful lighting design can really help out. Where you place your fixtures and how you aim them can make a big difference. A photo or sketch of your current layout might produce a few suggestions along those lines.

Also the white pars wouldn't need to be on all the time, you can simply dim them a bit or cut them entirely during one of your color transitions or when all eyes don't need to be on the band. Maybe even add a simple MIDI footswitch to your control setup that would trigger the white pars to switch on and off. Possibilities are pretty endless.
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Jeff Lelko

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Re: Looking for Guidance on Designing Scenes Sequences
« Reply #14 on: July 31, 2019, 06:08:59 pm »

...and try using diffusers with washes...

I disagree.  If the colors are already running on top of each other then adding diffusion will only make the problem worse.

Joe, one way to tackle this problem and give you more creative options is to vary the angle you hang your fixtures from.  One look around a professional theater will reveal just how many angles a lighting designer will use for all different purposes.  It's very possible to shine soft facial light from the front (read as around 45 degrees up and out) without washing out the colors or gobos you're using on the CYC.  Along those same lines, an often overlooked tool in lighting design is use of negative space.  Chauvet published a nice video that demonstrates the concept, and while this is more geared towards theatrics it can still benefit those trying to give a more 3-dimensional look to their designs.  Given that you're a band I'd be less worries about the quality of your "whites" and more interested in getting the most you can from what you have by varying your placement techniques.  Hope this helps! 
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Taylor Hall

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Re: Looking for Guidance on Designing Scenes Sequences
« Reply #15 on: July 31, 2019, 06:35:21 pm »

I disagree.  If the colors are already running on top of each other then adding diffusion will only make the problem worse.

I probably should have clarified a bit, that was more for using with dedicated white fixtures if he's worried about hot spots, not for washes in general. You're absolutely correct in that it won't solve any kind of issues with colors bleeding over.
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Joe Valente

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Re: Looking for Guidance on Designing Scenes Sequences
« Reply #16 on: July 31, 2019, 07:17:23 pm »

I disagree.  If the colors are already running on top of each other then adding diffusion will only make the problem worse.

Joe, one way to tackle this problem and give you more creative options is to vary the angle you hang your fixtures from.  One look around a professional theater will reveal just how many angles a lighting designer will use for all different purposes.  It's very possible to shine soft facial light from the front (read as around 45 degrees up and out) without washing out the colors or gobos you're using on the CYC.  Along those same lines, an often overlooked tool in lighting design is use of negative space.  Chauvet published a nice video that demonstrates the concept, and while this is more geared towards theatrics it can still benefit those trying to give a more 3-dimensional look to their designs.  Given that you're a band I'd be less worries about the quality of your "whites" and more interested in getting the most you can from what you have by varying your placement techniques.  Hope this helps!

It does, the video in particular, and the advice in general.

BTW, I didn't take Taylor's advice to mean "Stack up whites on top of the colours," because, although I'm somewhat new to the design of changing lights, I've been using static lights for some time, and am no stranger to issue of additive colours. So, no harm, no foul.

:)

I really appreciate all the advice, guys. I'm going to spend some time in the garage with the lighting rig and see if I can't improve on what I've got. Thanks so much!
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ProSoundWeb Community

Re: Looking for Guidance on Designing Scenes Sequences
« Reply #16 on: July 31, 2019, 07:17:23 pm »


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