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Author Topic: Yamaha D Contour  (Read 668 times)

Luke Geis

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Re: Yamaha D Contour
« Reply #10 on: July 12, 2019, 12:44:16 am »

The ones that ring :) sorry, I couldn't help myself.
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Mal Brown

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Re: Yamaha D Contour
« Reply #11 on: July 12, 2019, 01:17:49 am »

Thanks...  sage advice Luke..
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Fb Gorge Sound and Light
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Chris Grimshaw

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Re: Yamaha D Contour
« Reply #12 on: July 12, 2019, 09:06:14 am »

Thanks all.  Are there any frequencies that are automatic cuts for you when using the dsr-112ís as wedges ?

Heavily dependent on mic choice, positioning, venue acoustics, and whether the singer is wearing a hat.

IME, the better the equipment, the less "ringing out" you need to do.

Chris
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Peter Kowalczyk

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Re: Yamaha D Contour
« Reply #13 on: July 12, 2019, 04:38:11 pm »

Thanks all.  Are there any frequencies that are automatic cuts for you when using the dsr-112ís as wedges ?

I use DSR112 as wedges frequently; my standard vocal mic used to be e835, now e945.  in both cases, I'd reliably get my first squeal at 800Hz, so my mix template now includes a cut there on all my monitor busses.
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Luke Geis

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Re: Yamaha D Contour
« Reply #14 on: July 12, 2019, 06:56:40 pm »

In the past t5 years or so I have worried less about ringing monitors out and more on just being sure they are loud. The cold hard fact is simple; if you turn the monitors up enough, you are guaranteed to acquire feedback eventually. There is ultimately 1-3 frequencies that will be problematic in a premature nature. Usually around the crossover point or wherever the mic is most sensitive in frequency response. The modern speakers that have what I consider a more linear response pretty much have no problems getting plenty loud with little or no work. QSC is NOT one of those speakers, but it works well enough even still. I have a simple and rather quick regimen to acquire loud monitors that requires very little EQ and sounds reasonably good.

1. Roll off the low end with a Hi-Pass / Lo-cut filter. I usually end up between 140-200hz. I roll it off until it starts to sound obviously thin and then go back down till it just sounds full and rounded out again.

2. Turn up the mic in the desired monitor ( while using the mic as you typically would ) until you hear the first signs of ringing. Cut as little as needed and repeat until it is relatively stable and high in SPL output. If it is clearly loud enough and stable enough, then stop, you have done enough.

3. If and only if it is more than loud enough and there is some cleaning up of sonic quality to do, then go ahead and do that. Typically the mid range will bark at you and it will be very boxy with some honk. It isn't uncommon to sweep a little of the 400-500hz range out to get it to clean up a little and sound more natural. But be aware that this is the area that will make the monitor punch through the stage wash. So don't get too crazy trying to make it sound like your in a studio yet. You want all the punch and volume you can get. Once the band is sound checked and everyone is happy, if you have plenty of gas left, then you can pretty things up some more.

4. To some 1-3 up, basically, get the problems out of the way first and then deal with the aesthetics of it later after you are sitting in Happyville.
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Bradford "BJ" James

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Re: Yamaha D Contour
« Reply #15 on: July 14, 2019, 10:30:55 am »

200hz seems extreme. I often get requests for more low end when I hpf @ 120.....particularly from acoustic gtr players.
Maybe I SHOULD start at 200 and when they complain, roll it all the way down to 140ish. lol
As far as problem frequencies with the DSR12ís, I too found 800hz as well as i think around 8k. I donít have DSRís now but I recall Smaart confirmed something similar. No D contour on.
I havenít measured the DZRís. Itís on my Round Tuit list.
I usually leave the DZR dsp parked at 90 and pull out low end at the input or the mixbus eq.
« Last Edit: July 14, 2019, 10:40:45 am by Bradford "BJ" James »
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Luke Geis

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Re: Yamaha D Contour
« Reply #16 on: July 14, 2019, 01:19:07 pm »

I would say I typically end up being rolled off closer to 140hz. With a 15" monitor it can be as high as 200hz. Not necessarily 200, but close to it. Non-singing or musicians that have other instruments they play in the wedge tend to end up with a little more low end, but I try and be very sparse with giving back. I also usually copy my vocal channels so I can dedicate the copy to the monitors.
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Steve Garris

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Re: Yamaha D Contour
« Reply #17 on: July 14, 2019, 03:06:11 pm »

Interesting comments about the DSR tuning. For me, I almost always have a steep cut at around 5-6K, and I mean steep! I high-pass monitors at 140. And yes, a little dip at 650-800.

The other day I was setting up monitors for an outdoor show, and a horn player was telling me he was hearing too much 10K. I was looking at the analyzer and not seeing any 10K content, but for his sake I pulled it down, and he was happy after that. I suppose it's possible that I don't hear 10K very well.
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Mal Brown

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Re: Yamaha D Contour
« Reply #18 on: July 14, 2019, 03:12:41 pm »

This is more or less my approach.  My front line mics are primarily Audix OM-6.  If I get a husky boy voice, Iíll sub In an Om-5.   I see M-80ís showing up and of course folks that insisted on the guitar center standard...

All of those seem to want to go in to the 2.5 and 4K range so for me those are automatic cuts...  I also tend to work my hpfís a lot more today than I did when it was an 80hz switch...

The variable hpf is actually one of my fave things about digital ...  5 years ago, I was all aux fed subs, all the time.  Now itís not really thing for me. 
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Bass player, sound guy.
Fb Gorge Sound and Light
WillyandNelson.com
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