ProSoundWeb Community

Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
Advanced search  

Pages: 1 [2]  All   Go Down

Author Topic: Meyer tweeter array  (Read 5202 times)

John L Nobile

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1731
Re: Meyer tweeter array
« Reply #10 on: June 17, 2019, 11:19:41 am »

I don't recall piezos ever sounding very good. I always thought that the only reason for having them was to claim a 20khz and higher freq response on paper.

Am I wrong???
Logged

Dave Pluke

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 979
    • BIGG GRIN Productions
Re: Meyer tweeter array
« Reply #11 on: June 17, 2019, 11:55:20 am »

I don't recall piezos ever sounding very good. I always thought that the only reason for having them was to claim a 20khz and higher freq response on paper.

Am I wrong???

Nope!

All they did, IMHO, was to add a little HF static sufficient to fool some ears.

"The Emperor's new high end" for those of us too cheap to buy JBL slots or bullets...

Dave
Logged
...an analog man in a digital world [tm]

duane massey

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1509
Re: Meyer tweeter array
« Reply #12 on: June 17, 2019, 12:16:57 pm »

I don't recall piezos ever sounding very good. I always thought that the only reason for having them was to claim a 20khz and higher freq response on paper.

Am I wrong???
The small piezos were pretty horrible. The larger ones, if used with a passive network, could be "ok". I still have a small 2-way cabinet with a screw-on horn/piezo, and it works well for a monitor on a small stage. None of them sound good at higher levels.
Logged
Duane Massey
Technician, musician, stubborn old guy
Houston, Texas

Paul G. OBrien

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 973
Re: Meyer tweeter array
« Reply #13 on: June 17, 2019, 08:52:52 pm »

All of the original Motorola piezos were super tweeters and any type of deployment that didn't use them as such ended badly. I used them in a few DIY projects of mine back in the '80s, for home audio apps they delivered a lot more topend than the cone tweeters that were common at the time but they didn't have the power handling capacity to survive PA applications in singles or even doubles. I still have some with holes burned through the piezo element from my first DJ cabs, after blowing these up twice in 2 gigs I substituted regular bullet super tweeters and gained a massive increase in sound quality, instead of everything sounding like frying bacon from moderate drive levels up I could actually discern the difference between ride and crash cymbals and the system had much better dynamic range. Except for the later powerline compression driver versions these things were really only good for lower power levels.
I remember there was a guy down the street with a Traynor or Peavey 2-way system, 15's with the big white horn something like the old Yamaha 4115 but with and separate super tweeter box on top with 8 or 10 piezo units in an arched horizontal array. This system definitely worked better but it still had too much of the frying bacon sound at higher drive levels, I quickly came to dislike this characteristic after switching my own system to proper compression drivers.
Logged

Tim McCulloch

  • SR Forums
  • Hero Member
  • *
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 20315
  • Wichita, Kansas USA
Re: Meyer tweeter array
« Reply #14 on: June 20, 2019, 04:45:19 pm »

All of the original Motorola piezos were super tweeters and any type of deployment that didn't use them as such ended badly. I used them in a few DIY projects of mine back in the '80s, for home audio apps they delivered a lot more topend than the cone tweeters that were common at the time but they didn't have the power handling capacity to survive PA applications in singles or even doubles. I still have some with holes burned through the piezo element from my first DJ cabs, after blowing these up twice in 2 gigs I substituted regular bullet super tweeters and gained a massive increase in sound quality, instead of everything sounding like frying bacon from moderate drive levels up I could actually discern the difference between ride and crash cymbals and the system had much better dynamic range. Except for the later powerline compression driver versions these things were really only good for lower power levels.
I remember there was a guy down the street with a Traynor or Peavey 2-way system, 15's with the big white horn something like the old Yamaha 4115 but with and separate super tweeter box on top with 8 or 10 piezo units in an arched horizontal array. This system definitely worked better but it still had too much of the frying bacon sound at higher drive levels, I quickly came to dislike this characteristic after switching my own system to proper compression drivers.

All sizzle, no steak.
Logged
"Practicing an art, no matter how well or badly, is a way to make your soul grow, for heaven's sake. Sing in the shower. Dance to the radio. Tell stories. Write a poem to a friend, even a lousy poem. Do it as well as you possible can. You will get an enormous reward. You will have created something."  - Kurt Vonnegut

Dennis Wiggins

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 699
Re: Meyer tweeter array
« Reply #15 on: June 23, 2019, 07:05:19 pm »

Peavey had the same sort of "array" in the project series.

That would have been in the early to mid 80s I remember.

I experienced a demo of this in the early-mid 80's, sponsored by Guzzardo Music at a local hotel in Rockford, IL. The "impact" demo last only a few seconds. The midbass/lower midrange (100-600hz) was astounding; the rest was just very loud. I was literally breathless, in a good way.

It did have the piezo tweeter "array" on the top. I think it was called the Project 4.

p.s.>  At the time, I was running what was later called the Project 1 (Mf1-x over Mb2 over Mf1) with 2 CS400s and plug-in crossover cans. My favorite component was the MB-2 as it did what no trap could do.

-Dennis
« Last Edit: June 23, 2019, 07:30:14 pm by Dennis Wiggins »
Logged

Dennis Wiggins

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 699
Re: Meyer tweeter array
« Reply #16 on: June 23, 2019, 07:20:26 pm »

I believe the "array" had 5 of these stacked, for a total of 10 p-drivers.

-D
Logged

Paul Miller

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 65
Re: Meyer tweeter array
« Reply #17 on: July 10, 2019, 05:44:57 am »

Peavey had the same sort of "array" in the project series.

That would have been in the early to mid 80s I remember.

Here's a Reddit post showing several vintage Peavey cabinets including that piezo array.
« Last Edit: July 10, 2019, 06:19:45 am by Paul Miller »
Logged

Rory Buszka

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 79
  • Gearmonger
Re: Meyer tweeter array
« Reply #18 on: August 20, 2019, 01:26:04 pm »

Duane,

Sounds more like the Klipsch MTM tweeter array than anything Meyers, though I do remember piezos used in MSL-3 for a short period.


Purdue's Hall of Music had a portable system of MSL-3s (used for outdoor festival stages and at one time supported on the low end by 650R2s, then later by VT4880s) and I saw/heard the piezos. They were never very good sounding, mainly because of a horrible resonant peak at 6kHz that is the resonance of the PZT disc.

An example (not the Purdue system):
« Last Edit: August 20, 2019, 01:28:56 pm by Rory Buszka »
Logged
Friends don't let friends mix a band from the stage.

The expert in anything was once a beginner.

Brian Bolly

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 367
  • Baltimore, MD / Amsterdam, NL
Re: Meyer tweeter array
« Reply #19 on: August 25, 2019, 02:51:42 pm »

Does anyone here remember the old Meyer tweeter array?
The piezo array disappeared when the MSL-3 turned into the MSL-3A. The (IIRC) XM3 filter was disconnected and the MS2001A driver was fitted in place of the original MS2001N to make it an MSL-3A. As well, on the M3T processor, the TC circuit was supposed to be switched off.
Logged
Pages: 1 [2]  All   Go Up
 


Page created in 0.047 seconds with 22 queries.