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Author Topic: RCF Input Sensitivity  (Read 523 times)

Bob Faulkner

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RCF Input Sensitivity
« on: May 20, 2019, 09:33:08 pm »

Have several active RCF speakers (NX, HDL).   All have input sensitivity of -2dbu/+4dbu (except for the HDL!)

Why would the input sensitivity of -2dbu be an option, whereas my Yamaha DSR speakers (and others I've used) have the -10dBV setting.  There's a large difference between the -2dBu and -10dBV.  I have never used (in production) the -2db or the -10dBV.  I would think the input sensitivity settings on active speakers would be standard.  Yeah, I know... the great thing about standards is there is so many.

Perhaps the differences are related to where the speakers are manufactured?
« Last Edit: May 20, 2019, 09:40:34 pm by Bob Faulkner »
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Douglas R. Allen

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Re: RCF Input Sensitivity
« Reply #1 on: May 21, 2019, 07:14:44 am »

Have several active RCF speakers (NX, HDL).   All have input sensitivity of -2dbu/+4dbu (except for the HDL!)

Why would the input sensitivity of -2dbu be an option, whereas my Yamaha DSR speakers (and others I've used) have the -10dBV setting.  There's a large difference between the -2dBu and -10dBV.  I have never used (in production) the -2db or the -10dBV.  I would think the input sensitivity settings on active speakers would be standard.  Yeah, I know... the great thing about standards is there is so many.

Perhaps the differences are related to where the speakers are manufactured?

The difference between -2 db"U" and -10 db"V" is roughly 6db"U".  That said consumer grade products run around -10 Dbu so the -10 dbv setting would have the speaker reaching full output before the consumer grade preamp went into clipping. I've seen consumer grade DJ mixer's, PA mixers with the -10dbu output rating.  So I believe the -10dbv setting has the consumer level products in mind. I would want that switch to be hidden in a menu somewhere so the average "Helper" wouldn't hit it by mistake and have very loud , unexpected , output!

Douglas R. Allen
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Geert Friedhof

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Re: RCF Input Sensitivity
« Reply #2 on: May 21, 2019, 08:55:35 am »

My guess:

There is no actual switch to set the sensitivity, but you can feed the speaker balanced or unbalanced signals. The unbalanced signal will be 6dB attenuated compared to the same balanced signal. Does that make sense?
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Bob Faulkner

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Re: RCF Input Sensitivity
« Reply #3 on: May 21, 2019, 08:32:16 pm »

Thanks - all makes sense.  I do know why the -10db is there... but what I don't know is why RCF is providing a -2db setting (along with +4db) on their cabinets.  From my limited knowledge of the many, many other powered speakers cabinets available, I've only seen -10db as the other selection, never a -2db. 

Is there something different in Italy where -2db is needed over a -10db?
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Geert Friedhof

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Re: RCF Input Sensitivity
« Reply #4 on: May 21, 2019, 09:37:57 pm »

Again: There is no switch to set the sensitivity. It is just a matter of you providing a balanced or unbalanced signal.

Others do have the consumer level switch, which lets you select between +4dBu (balanced, -2dBu unbalanced, same as RCF) or -10dBv.
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ProSoundWeb Community

Re: RCF Input Sensitivity
« Reply #4 on: May 21, 2019, 09:37:57 pm »


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