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Author Topic: LED Garage/Shop lighting  (Read 1163 times)

Stephen Swaffer

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Re: LED Garage/Shop lighting
« Reply #20 on: February 09, 2019, 08:05:36 pm »

Timely topic for me! 
I would love to shop using CRI but so many of the inexpensive shop lights don't have this info. 


There's probably a reason they don't include it   ;) .  Just like everything else, in general, you get what you pay pay for.  Sometimes cheap is fine-but if it really matters....

For nice even light I really really like the Epanl fixtures:

https://www.acuitybrands.com/products/detail/753016/lithonia-lighting/epanl-flat-panel/fully-luminous-led-flat-panel

Been buying these for around $70-they're designed to drop into drop ceiling though.  Really brightened up our office space over T8's.
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Steve Swaffer

Jonathan Johnson

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Re: LED Garage/Shop lighting
« Reply #21 on: February 10, 2019, 07:21:41 pm »

Although I do have a lot of fluorescent fixtures that I could install replacement tubes into I'm working on a new section of the shop and have been tempted by the standalone LED fixtures.

What disturbs me about "standalone" fixtures — with non-replaceable LED elements — is that when the fixture fails, you have to replace the entire fixture. That may not be such a bad thing if you only have one fixture, but what if you've got a large hall with dozens of identical fixtures? What if that model of fixture is no longer available? Do you replace several dozen perfectly functional fixtures to maintain unity of decor, just because one failed? What if you decide that 4000K would have been better than 2900K?

If I could get a “fluorescent” strip fixture sans ballast and tubes, I could just put in LED retrofit tubes of my choice. And then I could just replace the tubes when they fail, maintaining unity of decor. Replacement tubes are cheaper than an entire fixture, there's less waste, and it's quicker.

There is definitely an advantage to the modular design of replaceable-element (incandescent and fluorescent) fixtures. Don't depend on the future availability of parts for nonstandardized fixtures.
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Rob Spence

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Re: LED Garage/Shop lighting
« Reply #22 on: February 10, 2019, 09:46:35 pm »

What disturbs me about "standalone" fixtures — with non-replaceable LED elements — is that when the fixture fails, you have to replace the entire fixture. That may not be such a bad thing if you only have one fixture, but what if you've got a large hall with dozens of identical fixtures? What if that model of fixture is no longer available? Do you replace several dozen perfectly functional fixtures to maintain unity of decor, just because one failed? What if you decide that 4000K would have been better than 2900K?

If I could get a “fluorescent” strip fixture sans ballast and tubes, I could just put in LED retrofit tubes of my choice. And then I could just replace the tubes when they fail, maintaining unity of decor. Replacement tubes are cheaper than an entire fixture, there's less waste, and it's quicker.

There is definitely an advantage to the modular design of replaceable-element (incandescent and fluorescent) fixtures. Don't depend on the future availability of parts for nonstandardized fixtures.

I think the issue is that we are on the leading edge of LED lighting. The fixtures being replaced have been in common use for 50 years. No de facto standard has emerged for LED area lighting.



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Stephen Swaffer

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Re: LED Garage/Shop lighting
« Reply #23 on: February 10, 2019, 09:57:06 pm »

it will be interesting to see how the industry addresses this.  Keep in mind that in many commercial/industrial settings lamp replacement is necessary with flourescent tubes due to dimming with age, etc. every 5 yers or so.  Given the current pace of technology, it won't make sense to replace LED with the sme s technology will be much better.  I m curious when the technical ceiling will be reached.

LED tubes present a conundrum-at least for electricians selling a service.  Direct replacements leave a ballast in place that can/will fail.  If you pull the ballast for direct wire you now have a non-listed fixture.

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Steve Swaffer

Jonathan Johnson

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Re: LED Garage/Shop lighting
« Reply #24 on: February 11, 2019, 12:59:34 am »

If you pull the ballast for direct wire you now have a non-listed fixture.

A concept that applies to any repair that doesn't use OEM parts.

A plant electrician I know was telling me about some screws that were OEM supplied for attaching identifier plates to industrial control panels. They were several dollars each, but functionally identical to hardware store screws that cost a few pennies each. But they had to get the OEM screws to maintain the listing.
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Erik Jerde

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Re: LED Garage/Shop lighting
« Reply #25 on: February 11, 2019, 02:19:28 am »

Speaking of garage lighting.  I know a guy who had a very nice woodshop in his double garage.  In the summer he liked to work with the doors open but that would kill his ceiling lighting.  He solved it by attaching single bulb 4' fluorescent fixtures to each of the door panels.  It worked great, doors up and he still had fantastic work lighting.  Doors down and if he needed side lighting he was also set.
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