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Author Topic: Why electricity and jewelry don't mix  (Read 1275 times)

Tim McCulloch

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Re: Why electricity and jewelry don't mix
« Reply #10 on: January 30, 2019, 08:02:13 pm »

That's gruesome! :-\

"Don't be like this guy, kids!"

I have this pic in my phone gallery.  I show it to folks who think it's okay to hot patch CamLocs.
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"Practicing an art, no matter how well or badly, is a way to make your soul grow, for heaven's sake. Sing in the shower. Dance to the radio. Tell stories. Write a poem to a friend, even a lousy poem. Do it as well as you possible can. You will get an enormous reward. You will have created something."  - Kurt Vonnegut

Dave Garoutte

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Re: Why electricity and jewelry don't mix
« Reply #11 on: January 31, 2019, 12:31:40 pm »

It's like back in the day, when they showed car crash pix during driver education to show the consequences of speeding or drinking. :-\
« Last Edit: January 31, 2019, 12:34:38 pm by Dave Garoutte »
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Nothing can be made idiot-proof; only idiot resistant.

Events.  Stage, PA, Lighting and Backline rentals.
Chauvet dealer.  Home of the Angler.
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Mike Sokol

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Re: Why electricity and jewelry don't mix
« Reply #12 on: February 01, 2019, 01:01:51 pm »

The TD at a client venue is now wearing a ceramic wedding ring after his prior ring experienced some DC contact.

This below is why we (stage technicians, production company workers) DO NOT, under any circumstances, disconnect CamLocs while powered or under load.  This is why we DO NOT work in energized panels or with stuff that might be energized without our knowledge (lockout/tag out).

I'm pretty sure this guy's career as a stage hand ended with the big blue spark.

An arc-flash accident is WAY more dangerous than a simple shock, even a relatively high voltage shock. If the shock incident is over quickly enough (within a few seconds) and you don't fall off of a roof, ladder or scaffolding due to the shock, then worse case they can probably restart your heart with an AED (hopefully) and you'll walk away with a story that will earn you a few drinks telling bar stories.

Arc Flash damage (as you can see) goes bone deep, generally blowing off any skin and meat in the area of the blast. Then it's reconstructive surgery, lots of rehab, and probable loss of something (like a hand or face) you really need and want. Arc Flash explosions terrify me a bit since I was in one up close and personal (luckily no damage) and saw/heard one happen a few hundred feet away (which certainly would have severely injured or killed anyone in the vicinity. What we do for a living can be very dangerous, so we always have to treat electricity with the utmost respect. 
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Mike Sokol
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Taylor Hall

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Re: Why electricity and jewelry don't mix
« Reply #13 on: February 01, 2019, 01:35:50 pm »

An arc-flash accident is WAY more dangerous than a simple shock, even a relatively high voltage shock. If the shock incident is over quickly enough (within a few seconds) and you don't fall off of a roof, ladder or scaffolding due to the shock, then worse case they can probably restart your heart with an AED (hopefully) and you'll walk away with a story that will earn you a few drinks telling bar stories.

Arc Flash damage (as you can see) goes bone deep, generally blowing off any skin and meat in the area of the blast. Then it's reconstructive surgery, lots of rehab, and probable loss of something (like a hand or face) you really need and want. Arc Flash explosions terrify me a bit since I was in one up close and personal (luckily no damage) and saw/heard one happen a few hundred feet away (which certainly would have severely injured or killed anyone in the vicinity. What we do for a living can be very dangerous, so we always have to treat electricity with the utmost respect.
We had a large cabinet flash off at my old job years ago. Distribution facility was getting new conveyors put in, so they had to redo a bunch of the electrical stuff since we were ditching the old pneumatic system. Luckily no one was hurt, but it blew the door clean off and flung it a good 30ft with enough force to put a sizeable dent in a 5" support pipe for a mezzanine structure. Sadly before the time of cellphone cameras, but the aftermath was a sight to behold and most assuredly deadly for whoever was within 15ft of it...
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