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Author Topic: Bad Connectivity  (Read 1666 times)

Ray Soly

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Re: Bad Connectivity
« Reply #20 on: January 14, 2019, 01:02:40 pm »

Ben,

As another poster pointed out, the antennas you are using work in the VHF range, while your wireless systems operate in the UHF range. That is most likely your main issue.

 Also, in you last post you stated that you are using 100' of coax in a 100' room. I have a few questions, 1st, why do you need a 100' of cable, meaning where are the antennas located in relationship to the receiver and the stage? Are you using the correct type of coax? There are several specifications, I believe the type you need is 50 ohm RG8X/U, but you can call Shure and confirm.

Because you stated you needed a fast solution, I recommend putting the receivers on the stage using the original 1/4 wave whip antennas that came with the systems.

If you are still not satisfied with the results, call Shure and get the proper cable and active antennas tuned for your BLX wireless frequency range, keep your coax as short as possible (25' or less), make sure the gain on the active antennas are set for the corresponding cable length (3db for 25' of coax), and spread the active antennas at-least 6' apart.

Steve   

this is really good advice,

Adding to what was already said...possibly wrong antennas, definately wrong cable type and lenght (if it's 100ft lg in the booth where you said  the receivers were , is it coiled???). The other mic rack' what's in it , how many , antenna type and or distro?
Start with the simplest system and work your way up to the 12...can you get one kit to work well?  take it out of the rack and booth and follow shure's instructions : shure wireless mic troubleshoot

good luck

Ray
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Eric Snodgrass

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Re: Bad Connectivity
« Reply #21 on: January 14, 2019, 02:05:12 pm »

Swap the antennas from the working system to the non-working system and see if it works.  If the dropouts disappear then it is definitely the antennas.
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Rob Spence

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Re: Bad Connectivity
« Reply #22 on: January 14, 2019, 05:56:32 pm »

When you did the “scan”, did you do it by the Shure instructions? That is, with no mics on, scan with first receiver, set frequency, leave mic on and located near where you plan to use it, then scan 2nd one, set frequency and again leave on and near where it will be used, rinse & repeat but keeping the mics a couple of feet apart?

Were all the mics from the other rack powered on as well?

You might want to use WWB to make a coordinated set of frequencies for everything in the room.



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Mike Caldwell

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Re: Bad Connectivity
« Reply #23 on: January 14, 2019, 06:02:42 pm »

Right now the antennae have a direct line of sight to the stage. There is another mic rack that has a different set of antennae positioned similarly that doesn't seem to have any issues. The problem mics are hooked up to three Shure UA844 antenna distributers. Frequencies were chosen using the 'Scan' buttons on the receivers. All of the microphones have similar if not the same dropout effect. The venue is a High School auditorium with a distance of about 100 ft. from the sound booth to the stage. The cables are BlackWeb brand COAX 100ft cables.

Again if the amplified antenna model you posted in your first post is actually what you are using that is the wrong antenna, how did you end up with those antennas in the first place.

Chances are the coax your using is standard 75 ohm CATV coax and a 100 foot of it to boot!!
With the correct antennas at your distro system 100 feet is not a big distance to cover with a wireless mic. Even 1/2 wave whip antennas will work for that distance.

Brian Jojade

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Re: Bad Connectivity
« Reply #24 on: January 15, 2019, 07:21:09 pm »

The BLX system is not the most robust available.  Without calling it complete crap, let's just say that I'd recommend them for things like yoga studios, etc., never for a stage production.

The BLX wireless is designed for up to 12 systems per frequency band.  Up to.  That means that there's no interference that you have to work around.

The marketing material that says you can get 300 feet of range line of sight is the same that you see on EVERY SINGLE wireless mic on the market.    That's just due to a mathematical calculation that calculates the max transmit power of the mic that everyone gets to use.  Realistically, don't expect more than 40-50' of reliable range, especially in a crowded RF environment.  It's not going to happen.

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Brian Jojade

Ben Petersen

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Re: Bad Connectivity
« Reply #25 on: January 22, 2019, 05:34:11 pm »

Ben,

As another poster pointed out, the antennas you are using work in the VHF range, while your wireless systems operate in the UHF range. That is most likely your main issue.

 Also, in you last post you stated that you are using 100' of coax in a 100' room. I have a few questions, 1st, why do you need a 100' of cable, meaning where are the antennas located in relationship to the receiver and the stage? Are you using the correct type of coax? There are several specifications, I believe the type you need is 50 ohm RG8X/U, but you can call Shure and confirm.

Because you stated you needed a fast solution, I recommend putting the receivers on the stage using the original 1/4 wave whip antennas that came with the systems.

If you are still not satisfied with the results, call Shure and get the proper cable and active antennas tuned for your BLX wireless frequency range, keep your coax as short as possible (25' or less), make sure the gain on the active antennas are set for the corresponding cable length (3db for 25' of coax), and spread the active antennas at-least 6' apart.

Steve   

Steve,

Both the antennas and the receivers are located in the sound booth 100' away from the stage. Thank you for your suggestion to move the receivers onto the stage. That would be my first choice, though the choreography and stage settings in the production (Beauty and the Beast) would make finding a spot for it a little difficult.

I will call Shure and see if there are any equipment flaws that I can sort out with them. Thank you again for your help.
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