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Author Topic: Cordless mic for rock band  (Read 2661 times)

Luke Geis

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Re: Cordless mic for rock band
« Reply #10 on: February 08, 2020, 11:37:42 am »

What was said about a $25 mic cable being king is true. You can and will have to spend THOUSANDS to get a wireless mic that actually only just performs as well as a $25 cable. The PG series mics are absolute trash no matter if it's the digital one or the solid-state one. They are cheaper than all the rest for a reason. Will it work? Sure, until it doesn't. They are not nearly as reliable and stable as higher dollar options. My opinion is that you have to acquire the QLXD or better to have a reliable and stable operation and even then it is user-based.  Wireless mics are not point and shoot devices; they require rules to be followed in order to have ideal operating conditions and even then they are still susceptible to interference.
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Callan Browne

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Re: Cordless mic for rock band
« Reply #11 on: February 08, 2020, 03:38:00 pm »

Have never used any kind of cordless mic. I play in a loud classic rock band. We turn the monitors up. Right now we use EV 767 wired mic's . Monitors are Yamaha CM12V's powered by Crown XLS2500. Every member (4) has a monitor. The EV mic's are great not feeding back. I move around ALOT!
Wanted to move to wireless mic. Was looking at

Shure PGXD24/Beta58A Digital Wireless System with Beta 58A Mic

And

Electro-Voice RE2-N7 Wireless System with EV 767a Dynamic Element

Has anyone use either of these? Leaning toward EV because of success of the wired versions .
EditDeleteReport#1+ QuoteReply

I went with the Sennheiser ew 500-935 G4 kit about a year ago and it's been rock solid. I've used it with a few different singers and it's been really great so far.

The unit itself is solid, has a battery indicator on the receiver, and can be connected to a computer to scan the local rf environment.

Line of sight helps, and I try to keep it away from any transmitters - same goes for any unit you get.

I know it's not in your list at the moment, but I can highly recommend this set.
Cheers,
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Melbourne Cover band: Rubix!

Jonathan Johnson

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Re: Cordless mic for rock band
« Reply #12 on: February 09, 2020, 01:10:35 am »

The fact that it's a digital system means there is latency involved...
Sometimes, a little latency can be a good thing. (Note I said "a little".)

I've added a few ms of delay to a system to reduce the tendency of feedback. (That's dependent on many factors such as capsule, speaker, placement, room size & shape, etc.) It's not a solution that always works, but it sometimes does.

If you think about it, placing the speakers several feet in front of the performers means that direct sound (from the performers) arrives later than the amplified sound. So, if you delay the amplified sound by an appropriate amount, you can sync it to reduce comb filtering. (Of course, that depends on the listener position, too. Nothing is foolproof!)
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Chris Grimshaw

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Re: Cordless mic for rock band
« Reply #13 on: February 09, 2020, 02:45:11 am »


If you think about it, placing the speakers several feet in front of the performers means that direct sound (from the performers) arrives later than the amplified sound. So, if you delay the amplified sound by an appropriate amount, you can sync it to reduce comb filtering. (Of course, that depends on the listener position, too. Nothing is foolproof!)

You seem to be suggesting that the sound from the monitors gets to the mic before the sound from the singer's mouth. I'm pretty sure this is false, assuming any kind of sensible mic technique. The mouth is much closer to the mic, so direct sound will clearly arrive first.

Delaying the speaker adjusts the phase curve, so I can see that applying delay might give you a different set of feedback frequencies to work on.

Chris
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Luke Geis

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Re: Cordless mic for rock band
« Reply #14 on: February 09, 2020, 02:37:06 pm »

I will agree that delay can increase GBF, but only if properly implemented. If you delay the microphone input, the sound produced at the monitor is relative so other than hearing the delay, the GBF potential is the same. Now if you delay the monitor only, it is a different story. If you delay the monitor the sound will be at a different phase and can impact the GBF, but then again, simply moving the monitor a few inches up, down, back or forth, will achieve the same thing.

Often times, inverting the polarity of the monitor will achieve a similar effect.  If there is a sensitive frequency, inverting the phase of the monitor may then null instead of couple at that frequency. This in combination with delay can often solve many issues before they even begin. I won't say it is a standard go-to thing to do but is a trick that can be employed if you are having issues.
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Tim McCulloch

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Re: Cordless mic for rock band
« Reply #15 on: February 09, 2020, 03:23:37 pm »

I will agree that delay can increase GBF, but only if properly implemented. If you delay the microphone input, the sound produced at the monitor is relative so other than hearing the delay, the GBF potential is the same. Now if you delay the monitor only, it is a different story. If you delay the monitor the sound will be at a different phase and can impact the GBF, but then again, simply moving the monitor a few inches up, down, back or forth, will achieve the same thing.

Often times, inverting the polarity of the monitor will achieve a similar effect.  If there is a sensitive frequency, inverting the phase of the monitor may then null instead of couple at that frequency. This in combination with delay can often solve many issues before they even begin. I won't say it is a standard go-to thing to do but is a trick that can be employed if you are having issues.

Move a half inch and your polarity inversion stops working.  Adding 3-5ms of delay to the monitor mix (or FOH) changes the frequency of the feedback loop, perhaps to a freq where the system is more stable.
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"Practicing an art, no matter how well or badly, is a way to make your soul grow, for heaven's sake. Sing in the shower. Dance to the radio. Tell stories. Write a poem to a friend, even a lousy poem. Do it as well as you possible can. You will get an enormous reward. You will have created something."  - Kurt Vonnegut

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Re: Cordless mic for rock band
« Reply #15 on: February 09, 2020, 03:23:37 pm »


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