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Author Topic: 46 VAC on the case  (Read 1068 times)

John Roberts {JR}

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Re: 46 VAC on the case
« Reply #10 on: January 08, 2019, 11:32:55 am »

I've felt as low as 25V from a leaky outlet strip protection device, before I grounded my kitchen outlet. It didn't feel like a shock, just felt like "something" wrong.

Be careful using current mode on VOM if it is a real low impedance voltage the VOM fuse can pop.

It is surprising that semi-pro (not pro) gear works as well as it does.

JR
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Frank DeWitt

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Re: 46 VAC on the case
« Reply #11 on: January 08, 2019, 12:42:58 pm »

You need a Fluke 117.

I am using a Fluke 23  (Similar to a 77) I will check the current this week.
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John Roberts {JR}

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Re: 46 VAC on the case
« Reply #12 on: January 08, 2019, 12:51:52 pm »

I am using a Fluke 23  (Similar to a 77) I will check the current this week.
Perhaps measure voltage drop across something like a 1k resistor before sacrificing a meter fuse.

JR
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Mike Sokol

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Re: 46 VAC on the case
« Reply #13 on: January 08, 2019, 03:47:33 pm »

You enabler you!!!

Well if TJ says buy a Fluke, I need to buy one. All Glory to the Hypnotoad!
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TJ (Tom) Cornish

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Re: 46 VAC on the case
« Reply #14 on: January 08, 2019, 04:56:35 pm »

Well if TJ says buy a Fluke, I need to buy one. All Glory to the Hypnotoad!
I've been recommending the 117 for the last 10 years or so, but I don't actually own one myself.  I have a Fluke 289 which is my meter with Lo-Z functionality, but one of these days I need to take my own advice and get a 117 for the road.  Right now I'm using a 177 which is a nice meter, however it doesn't have Lo-Z or the built-in NCVT.  One of these days I'll talk myself into another meter.  :)

On a very unrelated note, my most recent application for using my Flukes was to figure out how much voltage/current the solenoid winding system on my 1924 Seth Thomas Self-Winding #1 clock takes (Answer - 4ish volts at about 0.7A).  I overhauled the movement and replaced the lantern batteries that originally powered the clock with a wall wart.  It's now my shop clock.

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TJ (Tom) Cornish

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Re: 46 VAC on the case
« Reply #15 on: January 08, 2019, 04:57:11 pm »

I've been recommending the 117 for the last 10 years or so, but I don't actually own one myself.  I have a Fluke 289 which is my meter with Lo-Z functionality, but one of these days I need to take my own advice and get a 117 for the road.  Right now I'm using a 177 which is a nice meter, however it doesn't have Lo-Z or the built-in NCVT.  One of these days I'll talk myself into another meter.  :)

On a very unrelated note, my most recent application for using my Flukes was to figure out how much voltage/current the solenoid winding system on my 1924 Seth Thomas Self-Winding #1 clock takes (Answer - 4ish volts at about 0.7A).  I overhauled the movement and replaced the lantern batteries that originally powered the clock with a wall wart.  It's now my shop clock.
Here's the clock in operation.
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Frank DeWitt

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Re: 46 VAC on the case
« Reply #16 on: January 08, 2019, 05:39:04 pm »

In the days of analog meters you could tell if you had phantom voltage by watching the way the needle moved when you first connected it.  This was my clew to either check t with a light bulb or just short it.

For a long time I confirmed with the light bulb.  After I became confident that I was interpreting the needle movement correctly I stooped testing with the light bulb and just shorted it to ground.
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Frank DeWitt

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Re: 46 VAC on the case
« Reply #17 on: January 08, 2019, 07:26:15 pm »

I will go back and measure the current.  This one is a bit different. I found it because a tech complained of getting a shock

.45 ma
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John Roberts {JR}

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Re: 46 VAC on the case
« Reply #18 on: January 08, 2019, 08:18:58 pm »

.45 ma
You can feel less than that, but it is orders of magnitude less that what could cause muscular contraction and further injury. 

JR
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