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Author Topic: Shure Wireless bands coordination  (Read 1095 times)

Matt Greiner

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Shure Wireless bands coordination
« on: December 17, 2018, 01:39:36 am »

I'm looking at adding a few more wireless kits to my inventory.  How important is it to stay in the same band?  I currently have 2 Shure SLX systems that are J3 (572-596), but can get a really good deal on some that are H19 (542-572). 

I understand about looking at available channels in my local area and making sure that I will have space available.  My question is more asking if the 2 different bands will play nice with each other, or if I'm asking for trouble.
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Kevin Maxwell

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Re: Shure Wireless bands coordination
« Reply #1 on: December 17, 2018, 09:19:47 am »

I'm looking at adding a few more wireless kits to my inventory.  How important is it to stay in the same band?  I currently have 2 Shure SLX systems that are J3 (572-596), but can get a really good deal on some that are H19 (542-572). 

I understand about looking at available channels in my local area and making sure that I will have space available.  My question is more asking if the 2 different bands will play nice with each other, or if I'm asking for trouble.

When you add more and more wireless to your system it is usually nice to be able to spread them out across the spectrum if you need to. The only disadvantage to that is now you won't have the ability to mix and match transmitters and receivers. If all of you wireless are in the same band then they potentially can be interchanged if you need to due to a failure or if some other need applies.

The company I work mostly with has at least 3 different bands of wireless, but sometimes depending on the needs of a show you have to think thru what hand held mics are able to be tuned to what racks of receivers. But if all of our wireless were on the same band we wouldn't be able to fit them all in the band width available.
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Ike Zimbel

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Re: Shure Wireless bands coordination
« Reply #2 on: December 17, 2018, 09:40:32 am »

I'm looking at adding a few more wireless kits to my inventory.  How important is it to stay in the same band?  I currently have 2 Shure SLX systems that are J3 (572-596), but can get a really good deal on some that are H19 (542-572). 

I understand about looking at available channels in my local area and making sure that I will have space available.  My question is more asking if the 2 different bands will play nice with each other, or if I'm asking for trouble.
Go for it. You do need to be aware that even though they are in different bands they can still produce intermod products that can affect the adjacent band, but you can use WWB to sort that out.
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~Ike Zimbel~
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Matt Greiner

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Re: Shure Wireless bands coordination
« Reply #3 on: December 17, 2018, 10:53:30 am »


When you add more and more wireless to your system it is usually nice to be able to spread them out across the spectrum if you need to. The only disadvantage to that is now you won't have the ability to mix and match transmitters and receivers.

Great point.  For some reason, I didn't even consider that.

Go for it. You do need to be aware that even though they are in different bands they can still produce intermod products that can affect the adjacent band, but you can use WWB to sort that out.

Good to know, thanks!
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William Schnake

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Re: Shure Wireless bands coordination
« Reply #4 on: December 17, 2018, 11:46:24 am »

I'm looking at adding a few more wireless kits to my inventory.  How important is it to stay in the same band?  I currently have 2 Shure SLX systems that are J3 (572-596), but can get a really good deal on some that are H19 (542-572). 

I understand about looking at available channels in my local area and making sure that I will have space available.  My question is more asking if the 2 different bands will play nice with each other, or if I'm asking for trouble.
Matt, we have two different bands.  For our analog wireless we use the Shure ULX/P series on the J1 Frequency.  For our digital we use the ULXD4D and or ULXD4Q, G50 band.  Our systems are racked with 6 receivers to a rack.  We have a 3 space rack drawer in each rack that contains handheld, belt pack and guitar cable for each unit.  This keeps everything straight and no mixed up parts.  Of course we check each rack prior to anything going out and upon return.

Bill
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Brian Jojade

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Re: Shure Wireless bands coordination
« Reply #5 on: December 17, 2018, 06:18:37 pm »

If you want the least thinking, keeping stuff in the same bands means all you need to do is keep the mics in the same group, then scan for open frequencies and you're good to go.  If you are using 2 different bands, usually you can get away with the same thing, but it's best to punch the frequencies into WWB and make sure that they are compatible.

If you're only going to have 4 units, you should weigh the potential savings against the convenience of having all interchangeable components.  Is saving $50 today worth it if some date in the future you send out the wrong mic with the receiver by accident?
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Pete Erskine

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Re: Shure Wireless bands coordination
« Reply #6 on: December 17, 2018, 08:33:22 pm »

I'm looking at adding a few more wireless kits to my inventory.  How important is it to stay in the same band?  I currently have 2 Shure SLX systems that are J3 (572-596), but can get a really good deal on some that are H19 (542-572). 

I understand about looking at available channels in my local area and making sure that I will have space available.  My question is more asking if the 2 different bands will play nice with each other, or if I'm asking for trouble.

Might be best to choose wireless which offer the entire band such as Shure Axient Digital.  They also have the advantage of operating in low power to put up to 15+ freqs in the same TV station.
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Scott Helmke

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Re: Shure Wireless bands coordination
« Reply #7 on: December 19, 2018, 10:08:02 am »

Having some diversity in your frequency bands is generally a good thing.  You'll want to use WWB to avoid intermod issues, but you should be using WWB anyway if live in/near a city.
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Matt Greiner

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Re: Shure Wireless bands coordination
« Reply #8 on: December 19, 2018, 10:32:33 pm »

If you want the least thinking, keeping stuff in the same bands means all you need to do is keep the mics in the same group, then scan for open frequencies and you're good to go.  If you are using 2 different bands, usually you can get away with the same thing, but it's best to punch the frequencies into WWB and make sure that they are compatible.

If you're only going to have 4 units, you should weigh the potential savings against the convenience of having all interchangeable components.  Is saving $50 today worth it if some date in the future you send out the wrong mic with the receiver by accident?

I don't do any rentals with my wireless gear, so that (shouldn't) be a problem to keep them straight.

Might be best to choose wireless which offer the entire band such as Shure Axient Digital.  They also have the advantage of operating in low power to put up to 15+ freqs in the same TV station.

I wish the Axient was in my budget, but it is not.


Having some diversity in your frequency bands is generally a good thing.  You'll want to use WWB to avoid intermod issues, but you should be using WWB anyway if live in/near a city.

I'm really glad I posted this, as I just discovered WWB due to this thread.  I obviously have a lot to learn about it, however, perhaps someone can shed some light on a question regarding WWB.

My systems are SLX, which are not able to be networked into WWB.  If I'm reading this correctly, I can manually add my channels in.  Since I don't have any of the networkable Shure units, please forgive the following if my terminology is off.  Is there a piece of gear I can purchase (other than a networkable Shure wireless system), that will interface with WWB in a network, to be able to capture RF scan data in my band of wireless units?
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DavidTurner

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Re: Shure Wireless bands coordination
« Reply #9 on: December 19, 2018, 11:14:12 pm »

You can get an RF spectrum analyzer -  RF Explorer  is an inexpensive one  -  and software like Vantage software for Mac  or Touchstone Pro for Windows and create files that can be imported directly in to WWB.

There are other similar analyzers and software out there. RF Explorer and associated software are budget minded solutions, but in my experience work well. You can get the WSUB1G model which covers 240 to 960 MHZ from Amazon for about $130 USD. The software is about $50 for Touchstone Pro and about $100 for Vantage. There is a free version of Touchstone, but it only exports to CSV files that have to be massaged to work with WWB.

Henry Cohen, Jason Glass, Pete Erskine and Mac Kerr are the RF gurus on this site. Perhaps one or all of them will chime in about the pricier solutions. I learned all I know about RFcoordination from reading their posts. Among them there is a wealth of information

I don't do any rentals with my wireless gear, so that (shouldn't) be a problem to keep them straight.

I wish the Axient was in my budget, but it is not.


I'm really glad I posted this, as I just discovered WWB due to this thread.  I obviously have a lot to learn about it, however, perhaps someone can shed some light on a question regarding WWB.

My systems are SLX, which are not able to be networked into WWB.  If I'm reading this correctly, I can manually add my channels in.  Since I don't have any of the networkable Shure units, please forgive the following if my terminology is off.  Is there a piece of gear I can purchase (other than a networkable Shure wireless system), that will interface with WWB in a network, to be able to capture RF scan data in my band of wireless units?
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ProSoundWeb Community

Re: Shure Wireless bands coordination
« Reply #9 on: December 19, 2018, 11:14:12 pm »


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